Just like in fashion, different crafts rise and fall in popularity. Quilting, however, never really goes out of style, it simply reinvents itself over and over, evolving from simple necessity to art form. Here are some of the latest quilting books that blur the line between art and craft.

Modern Minimal by Alissa Carlton – Quilts get super sleek and ultra modern with these gorgeous graphic designs that use lots of white space to show off the simplicity of the quilting. Add a splash of sophistication to any home by draping one over a bed, a couch, or change the color palette to make one for baby’s room. These beginner-friendly quilt projects work well with any décor, in any room, and for everyone in the family!

Quilting Modern: Techniques and Projects for Improvisational Quilts by Jacquie Gering – From two pioneers of today’s modern quilting movement, “Quilting Modern” teaches quilters how to use improvisational techniques to make graphic, contemporary quilts and quilted project with seven core techniques and multiple projects using each technique.


Sunday Morning Quilts: 16 Modern Scrap Projects by Amanda Nyberg – features 16 bold and scrappy projects including piecing, appliqué, and improvisational work as well as expert hints and tips for adapting patterns to your own style, and effectively cutting, storing, and organizing your scraps.


Block Party – the Modern Quilting Bee: the Journey of 12 Women, 1 Blog and 12 Improvisational Projects – Twelve chapters (one for each month) showcase the designs of today’s leading modern quilters along with easy-to-follow guidelines, so you can reinvent their work in your own signature style. With this book in hand, you’ll have everything you need to start your own online quilting bee and enjoy collaborating with other fabric lovers around the world.

Transparency Quilts: 10 Modern Projects by Weeks Ringle teaches you how to use traditional piecing techniques to create layered translucent effects. By learning how to distinguish and balance the subtleties of color in your fabrics, you can achieve remarkable results. You’l l also discover how the visual relationships between different colors make all the difference in your quilts.

The story of the American Quilt Trail, featuring the colorful patterns of quilt squares writ large on barns throughout North America, is the story of one of the fastest-growing grassroots public arts movements in the United States and Canada. In Barn Quilts and the American Quilt Trail Movement Suzi Parron travels through twenty-nine states (including Iowa and Illinois) and two Canadian provinces to visit the people and places that have put this movement on America’s tourist and folk art map.

Through dozens of interviews with barn artists, committee members, and barn owners Parron documents a journey that began in 2001 with the founder of the movement, Donna Sue Groves. Groves’s desire to honor her mother with a quilt square painted on their barn became a group effort that eventually grew into a county-wide project. Today, registered quilt squares form a long imaginary clothesline, appearing on more than three thousand barns scattered along one hundred driving trails.

With more than fifty full-color photographs, Parron documents a movement that combines rural economic development with an American folk art phenomenon.

Filled with beautiful photos, The Gentle Art of Quiltmaking by Jane Brocket is not just for quilters – anyone will be able to find ample inspiration in the designs, colors and presentation of these glorious quilts.

Ideal for beginners as well as more experience quilters, instructions are given for 15 quilts and emphasize simplicity. Descriptions are clear and written in a chatty and encouraging tone. These quilts are more European in style; many take full advantage of the lovely large floral fabrics that are becoming more popular, and have a softer, less defined overall look and feel than many traditional American patchwork quilts. They are undeniably lovely.

Perhaps the most valuable aspect of this book though, is the design and inspiration process that Brocket takes us through for each quilt. The author shows us what has inspired a particular quilt – a favorite summer dress, flowers from the garden, a backyard hammock, tiles from Lisbon or a shawl from Russia – and then demonstrates how she translates this starting point into a quilt. Besides the usual section on how to make a quilt, Brocket lists favorite inspirations – books, shops, blogs, museums – and gives valuable insight on how to translate your vision into a finished object to be loved and cherished.