Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2017 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Dressmaker http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-dressmaker/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-dressmaker/ Wed, 22 Mar 2017 06:00:54 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe The Dressmaker, starring Kate Winslet and Liam Hemsworth, tells the story of Tilly Dunnage, played by Kate Winslet. This movie is based on the novel of the same name by Rosalie Ham. Tilly is an accomplished dressmaker who spent years traveling the world learning her trade. She has returned to her[Read more]

The Dressmaker, starring Kate Winslet and Liam Hemsworth, tells the story of Tilly Dunnage, played by Kate Winslet. This movie is based on the novel of the same name by Rosalie Ham. Tilly is an accomplished dressmaker who spent years traveling the world learning her trade. She has returned to her small Australian hometown in 1950s Australia. Tilly escaped from this town when she was young after being accused of murdering a young boy. She has returned to learn the truth.

Upon arriving back in town, Tilly finds her eccentric mother, played by Judy Davis, living in squalor. She begins taking care of her and scheming to get revenge on those who accused her of murder. Tilly’s way of dressing shocks the town. She begins to offer her dressmaking services to women in town, seemingly as a kindness, but really as a way of revenge. She begins working with the local sergeant, a man who has secrets of his own. Tilly also falls for a local farmer, Teddy, a man who lives next door to her mother and whose family has been stopping in to care for her mother while she’s been gone.

This small backwoods Australian town is rife with secrets and scandals, more than just Tilly’s exile for the supposed murder of her young classmate. More and more of these secrets are exposed as Tilly works her magic on the local women. This movie shows that nothing is what it seems and that everyone has secrets. Tilly struggles to find out the truth, remember her past, and clear her name. I really enjoyed this movie because Tilly clearly knows how to get revenge on people. While she may appear strong, she also has a lot going on under the surface.

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Turncoat by Ryan Sullivan http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/turncoat-by-ryan-sullivan/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/turncoat-by-ryan-sullivan/ Tue, 21 Mar 2017 06:00:09 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Turncoat is not your traditional superhero graphic novel. Duke is a superhero assassin. He’s the world’s worst superhero assassin, a fact that is lost on him because on every contract he is sent out on, those superheroes end up dead. He’s never the one that kills them though. His partner ends[Read more]

Turncoat is not your traditional superhero graphic novel. Duke is a superhero assassin. He’s the world’s worst superhero assassin, a fact that is lost on him because on every contract he is sent out on, those superheroes end up dead. He’s never the one that kills them though. His partner ends up doing the killing and Duke gets the credit. (And his partner usually ends up dead as well).

The company that Duke works with keeps pairing him up with weird loser partners and also only gives his contracts to kill D-list superheroes. Who wants to be known as the assassin who killed Bug-Boy or Freedom-Fighter?! Certainly not Duke! He just wants to kill a big name superhero, somebody from the Liberty Brigade. Duke is also battling against his ex-wife, Sharon. This battle isn’t a domestic one; Sharon is also a rival assassin who just happens to be way better at killing than Duke. She keeps stealing his contracts and his money! This bothers Duke. He just can’t win.

When a contract comes through to kill the entire Liberty Brigade, Duke first thinks it’s a mistake, but then realizes that this is the best thing that could have happened to him! He will finally have the opportunity to kill the big heroes, but also to beat his ex-wife at something. Killing the members of the Liberty Brigade will also give him the motivation and the prestige to move on from his ex-wife. Chaos ensues as Duke goes after the Liberty Brigade and realizes that there are other major players behind the scenes pulling the strings. This anti-hero graphic novel was a fantastic palette cleanser from all of the traditional Marvel and DC comic books I had been reading.

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Floret Flower’s Cut Flower Garden by Erin Benzakein http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/floret-flowers-cut-flower-garden-by-erin-benzakein/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/floret-flowers-cut-flower-garden-by-erin-benzakein/ Mon, 20 Mar 2017 06:00:49 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Happy first day of Spring! This is, by far, my favorite time of year, when the earth wakes up from it’s winter slumber and all things are new and possible. And best of all, flowers are blooming in the garden again. There is always a surge of new gardening books[Read more]

Happy first day of Spring! This is, by far, my favorite time of year, when the earth wakes up from it’s winter slumber and all things are new and possible. And best of all, flowers are blooming in the garden again.

There is always a surge of new gardening books published in late winter and early spring – you will find many of them on the new book shelves at the library. Gardening books tend to fall into one of two categories – practical or beautiful. Now, there’s nothing wrong with beautiful – you can find a lot of inspiration and ideas from those gorgeous pictures and who doesn’t like whiling away a winter afternoon dreaming of colorful gardens? And there’s nothing wrong with practical – these are the books that get you through the growing season. (My favorite is Barbara Damrosch’s The Garden Primer) But the fact is, there’s not always a lot of overlap. Happily, this year there’s a gardening book that is both practical and beautiful – Floret Farm’s Cut Flower Garden by Erin Benzakein.

If you have ever dreamed of being a flower farmer, or if you’re passionate about growing your own flowers (that’s me!), or if you simply want to grow a few flowers for your kitchen table, this book is for you. Over 170 plants are included in this book, all of which are easy to grow, some of which you may not have considered for bouquets (like vines, branches, and grasses). There is well-written practical information for each plants as well as lovely photographs (I love the use of lighting and perspective in these photos). And there are instructions for creating beautiful bouquets, arranged by season so that you can use readily available flowers from your yard or the farmers market. Erin includes “minor” flowers that are easy to grow but that you’re unlikely to find at the florist (something that I’ve been an advocate of for years) such as grape hyacinth and nasturtiums. It doesn’t take a lot of land or expensive tools to add a lot of life and beauty to your corner of the world.

I’ve long been a fan of the floret website and blog – there is an incredible amount of helpful information on the site (and, much like the book, it’s overflowing with gorgeous photography). I also enjoy the behind-the-scenes views of the job of growing flowers for a living – romantic yes but mostly lots of hard work. Much like their book, it’s the perfect combination of beautiful and practical.

OK Spring – bring it! I can’t wait!

 

 

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Irish Resources for your St. Patrick’s Day Perusing Pleasure http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:41:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources. Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:     AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!) Irish Genealogy Tool … Continue reading

Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources.

Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:

 

 

AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!)

Irish Genealogy Tool Kit

IrishCentral

Irish Genealogy.ie

 

 

Have you ever wanted to take a closer look at the Book of Kells? Check out the digitized book from Trinity College Dublin. 

 

 

In our Collections: 

Local Ancient Order of Hibernians


 

 

Can you believe the Grand Parade has been going on for 32 years?! The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center has a number of early posters for the parade in our Ephemera collection.

Image courtesy of Our Quad Cities

 

Interested in local Irish-American stories? The 2007-2008 Iowa Stories 2000 topic brought out local individuals with great stories to tell. Their oral histories are archived here as well.

 

 

The Celtic Heritage Trail of the Quad-Cities was an active local organization in the early 2000’s. Their records contain a good deal of Irish history and lore. Available from our Archive & Manuscript Collection. 

 

Come visit us for all of your Irish genealogy and history research needs!

 

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The Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-queen-of-the-tearling-by-erika-johansen/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-queen-of-the-tearling-by-erika-johansen/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 06:00:36 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Looking for a new book in OverDrive, I offhandedly asked another librarian if she had heard of The Queen of the Tearling. She said she had heard of it, that it had won some awards or been on some lists and that it was supposed to be a good read.[Read more]

Looking for a new book in OverDrive, I offhandedly asked another librarian if she had heard of The Queen of the Tearling. She said she had heard of it, that it had won some awards or been on some lists and that it was supposed to be a good read. Taking that as a good enough endorsement for me to read it, I checked it out and started listening to it after work. Holy smokes! I LOVE THIS BOOK! It’s the first book in a series and I honestly can’t wait to read the rest of the books. I am hardly ever motivated enough to finish the next books in a series unless I am blown away by the first. Johansen blew my mind with the first book, so my hopes are up for the next two.

The Queen of the Tearling is a fantasy novel packed full of adventure, journeys, and self-discovery, while also telling the story of a young girl’s coming of age. Kelsea Raleigh Glynn is a young exiled princess, who, on her nineteenth birthday, is summoned back to the castle where she was born to take her rightful place on the throne. Her mother died when she was young, but before she died, she sent baby Kelsea into exile to be raised and hopefully kept out of harm’s way. Every Raleigh Queen is murdered by assassins and therefore her mother wanted to keep her safe. Rumors swirled around the young princess with some thinking her dead while others believed her to be alive and as frivolous and vain as her mother. Mysteries abound and young Kelsea must work tirelessly to secure the trust of her people.

Kelsea looks nothing like her mother and also acts nothing like her. She knows the throne is her rightful place, whether she wants it to be or not. Trained and schooled in exile, Kelsea was only privy to the information her two guardians would give her, leaving her with wide gaps in her knowledge of Tearling history and her own mother’s life. Once Kelsea finds her way to the castle and proves she is the rightful queen, her troubles begin. Her uncle has been acting as regent since her mother’s death. He wants the kingdom for himself, despite the fact that he is rather unpopular amongst both the commoners and the nobility. He has also made a rather complicated alliance with the sorcerous Red Queen in neighboring Mortmesne, something that doesn’t sit well with Kelsea and a wide variety of the Tearling people.

This apocalyptic universe has a lot going on. Kelsea, having grown up in isolation, finds herself smack dab in all the problems. She is identified as the true queen by the fact that she is marked and is wearing the Tearling sapphire around her neck, a necklace that she has been wearing since birth. The longer she wears this jewel, the more she realizes that it is more than just your traditional necklace. It has magical powers and Kelsea isn’t quite sure how it exactly works… In addition to being protected by her sapphire, Kelsea is accompanied by the Queen’s Guard, a group of knights who have sworn an oath to protect the queen. They are a dedicated selection of men who sometimes are the only thing standing between Kelsea and her enemies. This book is a treasure trove of fantasy, dark magic, journeys, adventure, and self-love. Kelsea loves books and learning, a fact that I related to well. This book was incredibly put together and kept my interest the whole time. This heroine is no damsel in distress. Kelsea may need help at times, but she will ask for it and will strive to make herself better. She may be idealistic, but given her age and sheltered life, that is to be expected. I’m hoping that the next books explain the backstory further, but other than that, The Queen of the Tearling  sets up an intriguing world that will hold your interest all the way through.


The Queen of the Tearling is also available in the following formats:


This book is the first in the trilogy. The second book is The Invasion of the Tearling and The Fate of the Tearling. (Stay tuned for reviews of those once I finish them!)

 

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Library Closed for In-Service http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-in-service/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-in-service/ Thu, 16 Mar 2017 06:00:02 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe The Davenport Public Library will be closed on Thursday, March 16th for In-Service. The library does this once a year in order to train staff on new technology and policies, all with the purpose of providing the best possible service for the community. Remember, our website is open 24 hours[Read more]

The Davenport Public Library will be closed on Thursday, March 16th for In-Service. The library does this once a year in order to train staff on new technology and policies, all with the purpose of providing the best possible service for the community.

Remember, our website is open 24 hours a day with access to the library catalog, your account information and a wealth of online databases to help meet your immediate information questions.

All three of our locations will reopen on Friday March 17th with their regular business hours of 9:00am to 5:30pm.

 

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Online Reading Challenge – Halfway Home! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-halfway-home/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-halfway-home/ Wed, 15 Mar 2017 06:00:27 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hello Challenge Readers! How has the month of March been treating you? Have you found a great book or movie set in Japan? For many of us (and this is a massive over-generalization), the Japanese culture can be very foreign in a way that Europe is not. Western European culture[Read more]

Hello Challenge Readers!

How has the month of March been treating you? Have you found a great book or movie set in Japan? For many of us (and this is a massive over-generalization), the Japanese culture can be very foreign in a way that Europe is not. Western European culture permeates our lives here – even if we have no European blood, we easily recognize and mostly understand their literature and customs (this seems especially true of Great Britain whose power and influence at one time stretched across the globe). Japan, on the other hand, was closed to foreigners, with few exceptions, for centuries and sometimes seems to be an enigma even now.

Of course, no matter our differences we are, at heart, much the same – we love our families, we know pain and joy, great tragedy and incredible luck. It’s simply the setting and the way our society teaches us to handle these truths that is different. And isn’t that why we travel and why we read about other lives? To understand our differences and to see our similarities?

I’ve read an incredibly good book for our Japan adventure – The Dictionary of Mutual Understanding by Jackie Copleton. One day Amaterasu Takahashi opens to the door of her home in the United States to a young man with hideous scars on his face and hands. He claims he is her grandson Hideo Watanabe who she believed had died when the bomb was dropped on Nagasaki in 1945, forty years ago. She is understandably skeptical and wary and also frightened – his appearance reopens a very painful part of Ama’s life, of family secrets, betrayals, regrets and loss, pain that she has shut away and is now forced to confront.

What follows is a look back at Ama’s life, her poor, desperate youth, the daughter she protected fiercely, the husband who brought her a measure of peace. When the Allies drop the atomic bomb on Nagasaki, both Ama’s daughter and grandson were within the bomb blast and though they search for days, weeks, months, Ama and her husband are unable to find anything of their beloved child and grandchild. Eventually they move to the United States and Ama is able to fairly successfully ignore the pain of the past – at least until the man claiming to be Hideo arrives.

Descriptions of the day of the bomb and its horrible aftermath are vivid but not sensationalized. And while the fact of the bomb is a shadow throughout the book, it is not an the focus of the story. It is simply an unchangeable fact, a division between the past and the future. And while this may sound like a grim, depressing novel, it is actually about finding joy and accepting happiness and learning to not just survive, but to live.

I also liked that at the beginning of each chapter a Japanese word would be defined and explained. These words usually described concepts that are uniquely Japanese values and do not translate easily to English or to Western society. Many of these concepts are rooted in the ancient history of Japan and Buddhist philosophy and are a fascinating clue to what makes Japan distinctive. This added a lot of depth and understanding to the actions of the characters. This is one of those books that you keep thinking about long after you finish. Highly recommended.

What about you? What are you reading this month?

 

 

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Memory Man by David Baldacci http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/memory-man-by-david-baldacci/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/memory-man-by-david-baldacci/ Tue, 14 Mar 2017 06:00:42 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Memory Man by David Baldacci is the very first Baldacci book that I have ever read. His books have never caught my eye before, ie. the covers just don’t appeal to me, but I decided to give one a try. Looking through OverDrive, I found Memory Man. The premise was[Read more]

Memory Man by David Baldacci is the very first Baldacci book that I have ever read. His books have never caught my eye before, ie. the covers just don’t appeal to me, but I decided to give one a try. Looking through OverDrive, I found Memory Man. The premise was intriguing and seemed to be marginally similar to author Robert Galbraith’s Detective Cormoran Strike series.

Memory Man grabbed my attention with this tagline from the publisher: “A man with perfect memory…must solve his own family’s murder”. Interesting premise, right? I thought so. The idea that someone with a perfect memory would have difficulties figuring out who murdered his family had me instantly thinking about how frustrating that must be. I knew I had to read it. (And bonus: It’s the first book in a series!)

Amos Decker is a big man, not just personality wise, but size wise as well. In college, Decker played football. He was so good that he was able to go pro. Decker was the only person from his hometown of Burlington to ever go pro, a fact that everyone in town was proud of and something that Decker cherished. His life was changed because of football though. Decker’s very first pro football game, his very first play on the field, he was the victim of a violent helmet-to-helmet collision that destroyed his chances of ever playing ball again. It also left him with an extremely rare side effect: Decker never forgets anything. His mind seems to record everything.

Flash forward twenty years and Decker’s life is about to change again. Now he’s a police detective married with a young daughter. Returning from work late one night, he discovers the murdered bodies of his wife, daughter, and brother-in-law in his house. Decker is broken, his life is destroyed, and he quickly spirals out of control. He quits the police force, ends up losing his home, and finds himself living on the street. He ends up doing odd jobs as a private investigator, just enough work to provide him with a place to live in a somewhat seedy motel.

Over a year after his family’s murders, a man walks into the police station and confesses to the murders.  At the same time, Burlington is rocked by a catastrophic event that has the ability to cripple the town. Decker’s old partner comes to him seeking his help. He soon finds himself investigating his family’s murders and helping with the other police investigation. In order to get to the truth though, Decker must rely on his perfect memory, something that he has tried to manage and get control of over the years.

I really enjoyed this book. It was fast-paced, dealt with sticky subjects, and had me wondering who the bad guys were the whole time. I sometimes find thriller plots to be convoluted and even predictable, but Memory Man was a blessing. It is a thoroughly engaging, mysterious, suspenseful thriller that had me on edge until the very end.


This book is also available in the following formats:

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Fantastic Fiction http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/fantastic-fiction/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/fantastic-fiction/ Mon, 13 Mar 2017 06:00:49 -0500 Rachel at Info Cafe Most people get stuck in a reading rut. They have read all of the books by their favorite author and now they don’t know what to read next. Sometimes a friend recommends a good book to you and that keeps you from being stuck in a rut too long. But[Read more]

Most people get stuck in a reading rut. They have read all of the books by their favorite author and now they don’t know what to read next. Sometimes a friend recommends a good book to you and that keeps you from being stuck in a rut too long. But sometimes you want a book now and you have no one to ask. May I suggest a website. A wonderful website that thousands of people love. It is called Fantastic Fiction.

Fantastic Fiction began in 1999 as a hobby for Dave Wands of the UK. The website grew and in 2004, Wands resigned from his job and formed the website company. Now there is a small team of family and friends that works hard to keep the information accurate and current. There are not enough words to express my gratitude to these people!

Fantastic Fiction is a website that keeps track of books and authors. If you are wondering if your favorite author will be publishing a book soon, you can find that information on the website. If you do not know the order of the books in a series, Fantastic Fiction can help you with that. I always turn to this website first when I am looking for a book in a series, even over an author’s webpage. Fantastic Fiction always has the series listed and publication dates. It is very useful when you are looking up an author that writes books in different series (and there are a lot of authors that do!).

While having a website that lists books and authors is pretty great, the best features of Fantastic Fiction have not been mentioned yet. There are other features of Fantastic Fiction will help you find other books to read. First, you will see a section of books that an author recommends. For example, if you were on James Patterson’s webpage, you will see that he recommended Crimson Lake by Candice Fox. So if you enjoy reading James Patterson’s books, you might like to read a book by Candice Lake. Also, some of the books that he recommended are part of a series. So you may discover a new author and  a new series to love. Another feature on each author’s webpage is a section that lists other authors that are similar to the author that you are looking at. On James Patterson’s page, other authors that are listed include David Baldacci, Lee Child and Michael Connelly. This section is a great tool for finding a new author that you may like based on your reading preferences. And if you are still stuck, you can check out the top authors and popular books pages.

I hope that you check out Fantastic Fiction. It has a lot of useful information. And the author bios can be quite interesting and the author pictures can be amusing! Fantastic Fiction has a lot to offer so stop by and visit their page.

 

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An Exciting Find: Iowa death records, 1921 – 1940 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/10/an-exciting-find-iowa-death-records-1921-1940/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/10/an-exciting-find-iowa-death-records-1921-1940/ Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:14:11 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One of the roadblocks we frequently run into while helping patrons with genealogy and local history research is a gap in Scott County death records from 1921 – 1940. During that time, death records were maintained by the State of Iowa and … Continue reading

One of the roadblocks we frequently run into while helping patrons with genealogy and local history research is a gap in Scott County death records from 1921 – 1940.

During that time, death records were maintained by the State of Iowa and no copy kept by Scott County. We are still able to locate individuals from obituaries, cemetery records, and other sources most of the time. Death records, though, tend to have important names and dates. Many times patrons wrote to the State to receive a copy of their ancestor’s death certificate- for a small fee.

We were surprised, and extremely excited, to find this week that FamilySearch now has the missing death certificates from 1921 – 1940 on their website in digital form!

To find the information, go to FamilySearch.org

and look under Iowa records…

for Iowa, Death Records, 1921 – 1940.

You still need to contact the Iowa Department of Public Health to receive a certified death certificate, but for general research, the digitized version is incredibly useful.

Even more useful, FamilySearch.org is a free website!

(posted by Amy D.) 

 

 

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You by Caroline Kepnes http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/you-by-caroline-kepnes/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/you-by-caroline-kepnes/ Fri, 10 Mar 2017 06:00:43 -0600 Stephanie at Info Cafe You by Caroline Kepnes is a tale of unrelenting passion, love, and desire told through the eyes of a smitten young man. Joe Goldberg works in an East Village bookstore. His life is changed (such a cliché, I know, but just wait) the day Guinevere Beck, a young aspiring writer, walks into[Read more]

You by Caroline Kepnes is a tale of unrelenting passion, love, and desire told through the eyes of a smitten young man. Joe Goldberg works in an East Village bookstore. His life is changed (such a cliché, I know, but just wait) the day Guinevere Beck, a young aspiring writer, walks into his bookstore. He instantly wants to be with her. Everything about her appeals to him: the way she walks, the section she visits in the store, the fact that she doesn’t check out ‘normal’ books… She’s super sexy, tough, smarter than any other woman he knows, and is drop-dead gorgeous. He has to have her.

Striking up a conversation with Beck gives Joe just enough information to see that he is perfect for her. She just doesn’t realize it yet. Joe has to find a way to convince her and to, most importantly, learn more about her so he can become her perfect boyfriend. In his quest to learn more, Joe realizes that there is more to Beck than he initially thought, that she isn’t quite as perfect as she seems to be.

Joe is obsessed with Beck and the more he gets to know her, the more he needs to be with her. Beck has her own life separate from Joe. He doesn’t want to push Beck too hard to get her to be in his life as much as he wants her to be. Joe must be clever and soon his cleverness pays off. Each becomes obsessed with the other, a situation that has the possibility to abruptly spiral out of control, to even turn deadly.

You has the haunting, thrilling, psychological messages of a good suspenseful romance. The sociopathic voyeurism and manipulation that runs rampant throughout this book had me honestly feeling a little bit paranoid. Seeing the lengths that Joe went through to learn about Beck and how sneaky Beck was made me question my social media use and whether I’m using it too much. I also questioned whether I was simply connected online too much and whether I needed to start unplugging from the internet more often. The differentiation between what we consider to be our private and our public lives, as well as the ease that those lives can be monitored by outside forces and even hacked, were all things that I thought about as I was reading this book.

This psychological thriller creeped me out. In a good way. I have read many, many thrillers from the victim’s perspective. Said books are always about their quest to find out who is stalking them or hurting them or who is leaving weird things for them. These books may also be from the point of view of family and friends who are looking for the missing person. I had never read a book from the other person’s point of view, from the point of view of the person who is completely and thoroughly obsessed. I loved and was simultaneously repulsed by this book.


This book is also available in the following format(and that’s the one I listened to it in):


The sequel to this book was released in 2016. It’s called Hidden Bodies and it continues into the exploration of Joe’s life. I’m hoping the sequel digs more into Joe’s past and gives us more of an idea of why Joe behaves the way that he does.


 

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Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World (DVD) http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lo-and-behold-reveries-of-the-connected-world-dvd/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lo-and-behold-reveries-of-the-connected-world-dvd/ Wed, 08 Mar 2017 06:00:32 -0600 Brenda at Info Cafe Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World is a documentary DVD that explores the influence of the internet on human life. It begins by following internet pioneer Leonard Kleinrock into a room on the UCLA campus where the first internet communication took place at 10:30pm on Oct 29, 1969,[Read more]

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World is a documentary DVD that explores the influence of the internet on human life.

It begins by following internet pioneer Leonard Kleinrock into a room on the UCLA campus where the first internet communication took place at 10:30pm on Oct 29, 1969, between UCLA and Stanford Research Institute. Kleinrock describes the moment he began typing the very first internet message, “Login.” Before he could complete it, the computer system crashed, and the first message transmitted by the internet turned out to be “Lo” – thus the movie’s name.

Danny Hillis, an American inventor and computer scientist, describes the phone book he owned back in the early days of the internet. It contained the names of everyone on the internet. Can you imagine a directory of everyone on the internet today? It is estimated it would be 72 miles thick.

Director Werner Herzog takes us to Stanford Dept of Robotics, where we learn how the discovery of biomolecule patterns was enhanced by the creation of a crowdsourced video game called EteRNA. Crowdsourcing, as defined by Wikipedia (itself a famous example of crowdsourcing) is “to divide work between participants to achieve a cumulative result.” In this case, a videogame played by a multitude of interested laypeople -“lawyers, grandmas, students, bedridden people” contributed in useful ways to the collective knowledge base about RNA (Ribonucleic Acid), which is present in all living cells. Crowdsourcing has been used in a variety of other ways for the common good. In addition to Wikipedia, another well-known example of crowdsourcing is crowdfunding, the collection of funds from a crowd (for example, Kickstarter). If you would like to learn more about how you can be similarly involved in contributing to the universe of knowledge (sometimes even by playing video games!) see this list of crowdsourcing projects.

While at Stanford, Herzog takes us to Professor of Computer Science and director of the Artificial Intelligence Lab, Sebastian Thrun, who is designing self-driving cars. He addressed the concern for safety of self-driving cars by saying, “When a computer makes a mistake, it learns from it, along with all the other computers (in use and unborn.) When a human makes a mistake, just that one person learns from it.” He shares a fascinating anecdote about a certain class he taught to 200 students enrolled at Stanford. He was able to offer the same course online to interested members of the general public. Over 1000 people signed up for the online class. When he tested them, he found that the best Stanford student ranked 412th among all the students combined. From this he said he learned that for every one great Stanford student, there are 412 better out there in the world who couldn’t or didn’t go to Stanford.

Then, we are presented with some particularly dark sides of the internet. The family of Nikki Catsouras shares their story, explaining why they no longer use email or the internet. Nikki died in a car accident in 2006 when she was 18 years old. Gruesome photos of her decapitated body were posted online shortly after the accident. Then, the family began receiving anonymous emails containing the photos, one with the caption “Woohoo Daddy! Hey daddy, I’m still alive.” The Catsouras family deeply lamented the lack of accountability on the internet.

What would today’s landscape be like without the internet? We find out more about that by visiting Green Bank, West Virginia, home of a telescope 100 meters in diameter that picks up radio waves from outer space. To eliminate interference with the radioastronomy project, all wireless transmissions are disabled within a 10 mile radius. The area has become a haven for people who experience severe physical reactions to being in the presence of radio waves. Diane Schou and Jennifer Wood describe their lives before they moved to Green Bank. They spent all their time inside Faraday cages –  boxes named for the 19th century scientist Michael Faraday, designed to shield their contents from electromagnetic fields. Some regard their condition as a supersense. They regard it as a nightmare.

We visit an internet addiction treatment center near Seattle, Washington where we hear the personal stories of some clients. We learn about a South Korean couple who were imprisoned for allowing their newborn daughter to starve to death while they were consumed with playing a video game. Ironically, it was a game in which they were nurturing an electronic baby.

Adler Planetarium astronomer Lucianne Walkowicz tells us about large solar flares called Carrington Events, which have the power to disable communications and create widespread power outages, and how we could see the next powerful solar event soon. We are given a glimpse of what that might look like from footage of a recent, relatively small-scale blackout in New York City. Theoretical physicist and cosmologist Lawrence Krauss warns “if the internet shuts down, people will not remember how they lived before that.”

Famous hacker Kevin Mitnick is interviewed about the methods he employed to gain access to secured information. He goes into detail about how he manipulated weaknesses in cybersecurity systems, noting that he always found them in the people, not the systems.

In the final third of the documentary, the possible future of Artificial Intelligence is explored. Entrepreneur Elon Musk, who made a fortune through PayPal, talks about the rockets he is launching into space, and his goals of creating a colony on Mars in case Earth becomes unlivable.

Marcel Just and Tom Mitchell, brain scientists at Carnegie Mellon postulate on whether or not it is possible for computers to dream.

The Wikipedia Emergency Project is described. It is a plan that people should print out hard copies of the information found on its website and store them somewhere our heirs can find them should a catastrophic planetary event occur.

The documentary prompted much thought, and left me with so many questions the first time around, I eagerly watched it a second time a couple of weeks later, after I gave myself some time to let the ideas rattle around in my mind for a while. If you like to explore multiple sides of issues relating to the past, present, and future of technology I would recommend you watch Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World.

 

 

 

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Digital Learning Day in the Archives http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/23/digital-learning-day-in-the-archives/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/23/digital-learning-day-in-the-archives/ Thu, 23 Feb 2017 17:31:24 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In honor of Digital Learning Day, the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is highlighting HeritageQuest, one of the Davenport Public Library’s research databases. There’s a wealth of genealogical information to explore and you can access it from home, for free, with your library card! How to … Continue reading

In honor of Digital Learning Day, the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is highlighting HeritageQuest, one of the Davenport Public Library’s research databases. There’s a wealth of genealogical information to explore and you can access it from home, for free, with your library card!

How to get there:

From the library’s home page (davenportlibrary.com), click on ‘Research Tools’ and select ‘Online Resources’ from the drop-down menu.

research

Next, select ‘Genealogy and Local History’ from the ‘View by Subject’ list in the drop-down menu under ‘All Online Databases.’

genlocal

Choose the ‘HeritageQuest Online’ link.

heritagequest

Just click on the green ‘Begin Searching’ button to start discovering family history documents!

begin

You can search or browse U.S. Census Records, city directories, the 1850 and 1860 Slave Schedules, U.S. Indian Census Rolls, and more!

search

Check it out! Learn what online digitial treasures the Davenport Public Library has for you on Digital Learning Day 2017!

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Presidents’ Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/17/presidents-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/17/presidents-day/ Fri, 17 Feb 2017 15:58:17 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections On “Presidents’ Day” George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are usually the first to be recognized, and quite logically so, since both were born in February. However, the spirit of the day can be broadened to include more “Presidents” of the … Continue reading

On “Presidents’ Day” George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are usually the first to be recognized, and quite logically so, since both were born in February. However, the spirit of the day can be broadened to include more “Presidents” of the past.

 

In November 1910, President Theodore Roosevelt made a visit to Davenport’s VanderVeer Park. The Music Pavilion was crowded with onlookers as Roosevelt addressed his constituents from the stage.

presidents

Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2003-09    Photograph by J.B. Hostetler

 

President Woodrow Wilson was saluted by the boys from Battery B as he rolled into Iowa on the train across the Government Bridge in early 1916.

presidents2

Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2001-24               Photographer unknown

 

Speaking of trains, a pair of Roosevelts addressed a Davenport crowd from one in a 1936 campaign stop. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor earned a second term in the White House, defeating Republican nominee Kansas Governor Alfred Landon in that election.

presidents3

Image Source:  Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center Davenport Public Library Photograph Collection VM89-000844

 

President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Rosalynn arrived in Davenport August 21, 1979 aboard a different type of transportation – the Delta Queen Riverboat! Speaking of Riverboats, (and coming full circle) who remembers “The President”?

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Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2009-19           Copyright Karen Deneve Clevenger Moline, IL

 

For these and many other interesting items, drop by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center! But don’t come on Presidents’ Day. . . We will be closed for the holiday!

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An Unfortunate Valentine’s Day Blog http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/14/an-unfortunate-valentines-day-blog/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/14/an-unfortunate-valentines-day-blog/ Tue, 14 Feb 2017 12:48:58 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections While researching recently, we came across what looked like a wonderful Valentine’s Day blog about love. It was only while doing further research we found it was more a case of love gone wrong. On February 6, 1920 The Davenport … Continue reading

While researching recently, we came across what looked like a wonderful Valentine’s Day blog about love. It was only while doing further research we found it was more a case of love gone wrong.

On February 6, 1920 The Davenport Daily Times ran a lovely article about a local wounded soldier from the Great War who married his nurse.

Mckay Wedding

The Davenport Daily Times, February 6, 1920. Pg. 2

Young William McKay had left Davenport after enlisting in the United States Army on April 5, 1918. In July of that year, he was sent overseas to the battlefront as a member of the Transportation Corp 308. He was injured a short time later when the truck he was driving overturned and trapped him beneath it.

Mr. McKay was badly wounded and transported to the military hospital in Brest, France for recovery. His most serious injury being a crushed right leg that would never regain mobility. He also developed a leaking heart problem after the accident.

It was at this hospital he met a nurse named Mary Ward who had been caring for soldiers in Brest since July of 1918. Coincidentally, her parents had relocated to Davenport from Wisconsin while she was overseas caring for wounded patients.    

According to the article, as Mr. McKay was transferred to different hospitals during his recovery, Miss Ward managed to be transferred with him.

Mr. McKay was officially discharged from the U. S. Army on April 30, 1919 while recovering at Mercy Hospital in Davenport.

On January 31, 1920 the couple took out a marriage license in Scott County, Iowa. William McKay, 28 years old, and Mary Ward, 35 years old, were married February 2, 1920 at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church in Davenport. Their marriage license indicated it was the first marriage for both.

McKay Wedding License 1

SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage. #1479413

McKay Wedding License 2

SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage. #1479413

They were expected to reside after the wedding with her parents in Davenport.

We all thought it was a wonderful story and the next step was to look into records to track the couple over the years. We quickly realized something was wrong. In the 1920 census, taken in late spring of that year, William McKay is listed as single and living with his mother in Davenport. There was no trace of the Ward family.

Our first thought was his new bride had died in the influenza epidemic that had occurred in late winter/early spring in Davenport. But no death was found in the records.

What we did locate was a petition for divorce filed by William McKay on March 6, 1920 in the local newspaper. The reason for the divorce being Mr. McKay had found out on March 4th that his wife was still married and that husband was living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

We turned to Ancestry.com for further information and found that Mary Ward had married a George McNitt in 1897 in the state of Wisconsin. We were able to locate the couple living together in Beloit, Wisconsin with her parents in the 1900 United States Census.

We then found Mr. McNitt in the 1910 United States census in Beloit with a new wife named Emma. They married in 1906.

Could this all have been a misunderstanding we wondered?

Then we located a marriage record from Kane County, Illinois. Mary Ward had married a William J. Borsdorf on June 16, 1910.

We are unable to find Mary or William J. Borsdorf in the 1910 census, but we did find William’s WWI Draft Registration card from 1917, which lists his wife’s name as Mary. Mr. Borsdorf was living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the time.

We then find Mr. Borsdorf in the 1920 United States census listed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a boarder in a house. He is listed as married, but no wife is listed with him.

We believe William J. Borsdorf is the husband that William McKay learned of on March 4, 1920.

We did not find a final divorce record for William and Mary McKay. We did find a case number and District Court docket number. We believe, based on other cases we have read about, that the marriage was considered void (or “set aside” using a term we find in newspaper accounts of the period) as the divorce petition was filed just over 30 days after the marriage vows were taken and that she was married to someone else.

A search of local police records find no charges were filed against Mary for bigamy.

To make things even more unusual, we find in the 1930 United States census that Mary had returned to William Borsdorf and they were living together as husband and wife in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

They remained together in Milwaukee until Mr. Borsdorf died on March 30, 1948. Mary died on September 9, 1956. They were buried next to each other in Holy Cross Cemetery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

As for William McKay, he never remarried. In another twist, after Mr. McKay’s mother passed away he moved to a Veterans Hospital probably due to his injury and heart problem. We find him living there in the 1930 and 1940 United States census records.

Where was the hospital located? Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Mr. McKay passed away on August 31, 1948. His body was returned to Davenport where he was buried in Holy Family Cemetery.

His obituary in The Davenport Democrat and Leader stated he was never married.

References:

  • The Davenport Daily Times, February 6, 1920. Pg. 2
  • SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage – #1479413
  • The Davenport Daily Times, March 9, 1920. Pg. 8
  • The Davenport Democrat and Leader, September 1, 1948. Pg. 13
  • Ancestry.com

(posted by Amy D.)

 

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In Memoriam: Dudley Bell Priester http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/02/in-memoriam-dudley-bell-priester/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/02/in-memoriam-dudley-bell-priester/ Thu, 02 Feb 2017 16:40:34 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Dudley Bell Priester was born January 18, 1923 in Davenport, Iowa to Oscar and Helen (Bell) Priester. According to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, his father was vice-President of Priester Construction Company and his mother owned a gift shop. The … Continue reading

Dudley Bell Priester was born January 18, 1923 in Davenport, Iowa to Oscar and Helen (Bell) Priester. According to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, his father was vice-President of Priester Construction Company and his mother owned a gift shop.

The family lived at 2745 Wood Lane in the McClellan Heights neighborhood in East Davenport. Dudley attended Davenport High School and, later, Lawrenceville Prep School in New Jersey from 1939-1941, where he was captain of the wrestling team. He then went to Princeton University in the fall of 1941.

NameDudley Bell Priester School Lawrenceville School Year 1941 Ancestry.com. U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Various school yearbooks from across the United States.

Name Dudley Bell Priester
School Lawrenceville School
Year 1941
Ancestry.com. U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Original data: Various school yearbooks from across the United States.

He graduated in 2 years so he could go into the Civil Engineering Corps of the Navy. He served in the 111th and 56th U.S. Naval Construction Battalions stationed in the South Pacific during WWII.

After leaving the Navy, he started working at his father’s company, Priester Construction, but his first construction job was the administration building at the Rock Island Arsenal in 1939. Priester was in charge of the construction of the Davenport Public Library building designed by architect Edward Durell Stone that was completed in 1968. He was also responsible for the Modern Woodmen of America office in Rock Island, the foundation construction at Alcoa, and many other local projects.

Priester married Jean Elizabeth Hansen in March 1947 and had 5 children: Bill, Nancy, Ted, Charlie and Mary. They lived in a mansion at 49 Hillcrest Avenue from 1954 – 2012, before downsizing to a condominium at the Carriage Club.

Priester served on the board of the Quad City Symphony Orchestra, Davenport Museum of Art, and Putnam Museum, was a member of the Master Builders of Iowa, and served as President of the Outing Club and the Town Club. He was a stamp collector and loved to wear a bow tie, preferring the Churchill (blue with white polka dots)

Dudley Bell Priester passed away January 23, 2017 at home.

posted by Cristina

Works Cited

Davenport, Scott, Iowa, United States; county district courts, Iowa. “Dudley Bell Priester.” 20 January 1923. “Iowa, County Births, 1880-1935,” database, FamilySearch. 20 May 2016. <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V4X4-JPD>.

“Dudley Bell Priester.” Quad-City Times 26 January 2017: A8.

“Iowa, World War II Bonus Case Files, 1947-1954 [database on-line].” n.d. Ancestry.com. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/8825/41912_329333-02569?pid=222074>.

Jensen, Julie. “Priester constructing a pretty interesting life.” The Leader 05 December 2003: B6.

Lawrenceville School. The Lawrenceville Olla Podrida. Ed. Jr., William Howard Stoval. Lawrenceville,: Class of nineteen hundred and forty-one, 1941. 01 February 2016. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/1265/43134_b194783-00179?pid=305260181>.

Speer, Mary Louise. “Davenport library celebrates 40 years.” Quad-City Times 06 October 2008: B1.

United States of America, Bureau of the Census. “Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930.” 21 April 1930. Ancestry.com. 01 February 2017. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/6224/4584438_00484?pid=31704095>.

Wundram, Bill. “Bow tie wearers bow to nobody.” Quad-City Times 25 August 2010: A2.

—. “Noted Q-C mansion yields treasures.” Quad-City Times 25 September 2012: A2.

 

 

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In Memoriam: Sgt. Major Alvis Marshal Taylor http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/26/in-memoriam-sgt-major-alvis-marshal-taylor/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/26/in-memoriam-sgt-major-alvis-marshal-taylor/ Thu, 26 Jan 2017 17:22:06 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Sgt. Major Alvis Marshal Taylor, one of only two Quad-City area survivors of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, passed away last week on Monday, January 16, 2017. Alvis Taylor was born on March 18, 1923 in … Continue reading

Sgt. Major Alvis Marshal Taylor, one of only two Quad-City area survivors of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, passed away last week on Monday, January 16, 2017.

Alvis Taylor was born on March 18, 1923 in Caldwell, Burleson County, Texas to William Marshal Taylor and Martha Elizabeth Harper. Below is his birth certificate:

Alvis Taylor Birth

The 1930 Census shows Alvis M (age 7) living in Burleson County, Texas with his parents and siblings: William (age 35), Martha E. (age 29), Willie E. (age 12), Ester M. (age 9), and Milton (age 1).

Alvis Taylor 1930 Census

Alvis enlisted in the U.S. Army at age 16. In the 1940 Census, we see young Alvis M. (age 19) stationed with the 11th Medical Regiment at Schofield Barracks in Oahu, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Alvis Taylor 1940 Census

At 11:55am on Sunday, December 7, 1941, Taylor was working alone at the Barracks Hospital when he witnessed Japanese planes circling in figure 8 formations, attacking U.S. Naval ships anchored at Pearl Harbor. The planes were flying so low he could see the Japanese pilots inside. Two rounds of bombs and torpedoes sunk 4 U.S. battleships, damaged 4 others, killed 2,402 and injured almost 1,200 American sailors and Marines. 90 percent of the people there were on shore leave.

The first sergeant and other senior NCOs were married and living elsewhere on post, so on his colonel’s order, Taylor took over. He called in doctors and coordinated dozens of ambulances to take the wounded to hospitals. At one point, he was sent to Pearl Harbor with 32 of his 67 ambulances. He was told to pick up the patients on ships and in the water.

Taylor was subjected to enemy fire when he accompanied the ambulances, but he managed to escape without injury. Thankfully, none of his ambulance drivers were killed.

After the tragedy, Taylor, who earned the Legion of Merit for meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services and achievements, returned to Schofield Barracks and to his regular duties. Later, he was sent to the Transportation Corps OCS, then continued his military career at various locations, including the Rock Island Arsenal.

First Sgt. Alvis M. Taylor married Mary Emma Garrett on December 20, 1942 in Austin, Texas. Their first son was born in Japan, where Sgt. Taylor was stationed. Mary passed away on December 18, 2005 in Coal Valley, Illinois. She is buried in the Rock Island National Cemetery.

Taylor kept his Pearl Harbor story to himself, not talking about his experience until many years later.

“You can see the pictures, but you can’t smell it and taste it. My dad can still smell that smell and taste that taste 73 years later. He remembers every minute of that day – from when he woke until he passed out from exhaustion,” said Taylor’s son Brian in a 2014 interview.

Alvis Taylor retired from the U.S. Army in 1959 as a major after 20 years of service; he retired from the U.S. Army Armament Command in 1980 after 20 additional years of civil service.

He received a Quilt of Valor in 2015, an experience he found “overwhelming.”

“This quilt is given to you, to wrap around you to give you comfort and warmth and know that you were prayed for, supported and given a heartfelt thank you.”

And a heartfelt thank you from us to you, Alvis Taylor, for your service. 

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In Memoriam: Bill Edmond http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/13/in-memoriam-bill-edmond/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/13/in-memoriam-bill-edmond/ Fri, 13 Jan 2017 17:20:57 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections William F. “Bill” Edmond was born December 4, 1949 in Indiana, PA. His parents were Robert and Elsie (Sees) Edmond. He attended High school in Michigan and attended the University of Texas, El Paso. He served in the U.S. Army … Continue reading

William F. “Bill” Edmond was born December 4, 1949 in Indiana, PA. His parents were Robert and Elsie (Sees) Edmond. He attended High school in Michigan and attended the University of Texas, El Paso. He served in the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. Bill married Pamela Jean (Lutz) Gephard on December 2, 1995 in Las Vegas, NV. They moved to Davenport in 2005, where he worked as a salesperson for Buysse Dodge and Terry Frazer’s RV Center.

Bill Edmond was elected 2nd Ward Alderman in March 2009, filling a vacancy left by Shawn Hamerlinck, who had been elected to the Iowa Senate. During his campaign, he stated that his top priorities were infrastructure improvements and maintenance and public safety. He was also a Candidate to the Iowa House of Representatives for District 89 in November 2012.

A fiscal conservative, Mr. Edmond was Vice Chairman of the Finance Committee. He was also the Council Liaison for the Davenport Municipal Airport. His most notable contributions were planning for Veterans Memorial Park and the off-leash dog park at the foot of Marquette Street at Centennial Park.

Sadly, Bill Edmond died on Tuesday, January 10th in Davenport. He will be buried at the National Cemetery in Rock Island.

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A Moment in (Watch) Time http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/06/a-moment-in-watch-time/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/01/06/a-moment-in-watch-time/ Fri, 06 Jan 2017 14:49:29 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Once again our J. B. Hostetler glass plate negative collection has yielded another fascinating image: a young H. E. Meier posing in his World War I Doughboy uniform. Herman Edward Meier was born to John and Christina Meier on July 21, … Continue reading

Once again our J. B. Hostetler glass plate negative collection has yielded another fascinating image: a young H. E. Meier posing in his World War I Doughboy uniform.

Herman Edward Meier was born to John and Christina Meier on July 21, 1896 in Nebraska. He enlisted in the United States Army on June 25, 1917, just shy of his 21st birthday. Sadly, during his time overseas his only sibling, Marie Meier, died on December 9, 1918 in Davenport during the Influenza epidemic. He was discharged on January 22, 1919, having achieved the rank of Sergeant. Herman then returned to Davenport and the family concrete block business; the next year, on November 25th, he married Leona Meyer. He died in Davenport on February 8, 1973, and was buried at the Rock Island National Cemetery in Rock Island, Illinois.

watch

H. E. Meier taken by J. B. Hostetler. c. 1917. dpl17572a

It is the wrist watch peeking out from under Mr. Meier’s sleeve that caught our attention.

In the late nineteenth century, the wrist watch was known as a delicate piece of jewerly worn by women. The first was created for a Hungarian countess by a Swiss company in 1868. While there are some references to the use of wrist watches by men at this time, including the German Navy in the 1880’s and during the Boer War, it was not widespread.

Even by the beginning of World War I, the wrist watch was not a common fashion accessory for American men. Our photographs show local worthies wearing pocket watches well into the early twentieth century.

The reason wrist watches became popular during World War I is simple: a military man could not be fumbling in his clothes for a pocket watch in the midst of battle. The wrist watch provided quick and easy access to the correct time.

We were very pleased to find this early example of wrist watch-wearing among our portrait photographs!

(posted by Amy D.)

Sources

  • Ancestry.com
  • The Davenport Daily Democrat and Leader, December 9, 1918. Page 11.
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Iowa’s 170th Birthday – Life in Davenport at the end of 1846 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/12/30/iowas-170th-birthday-life-in-davenport-at-the-end-of-1846/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/12/30/iowas-170th-birthday-life-in-davenport-at-the-end-of-1846/ Fri, 30 Dec 2016 17:31:17 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections The State of Iowa turned 170 years old this week! Let’s have a look back at what was going on in Davenport at the time.  From the Davenport “Town” Council Proceedings for December 8th 1846: The big issues: amending the … Continue reading

The State of Iowa turned 170 years old this week! Let’s have a look back at what was going on in Davenport at the time. 

From the Davenport “Town” Council Proceedings for December 8th 1846:

The big issues: amending the corporation charter to add Ferry privileges, roaming hogs, a fence for the City Cemetery, and a few people still owing money for road taxes.

img_0125 img_0124

 

Selected stories from the Davenport Weekly Gazette, Thursday December 31, 1846:

It had been a pleasantly mild winter up to that point.

Prices for produce and provisions seemed reasonable.

1846001-12-30-20161846005-12-30-2016

Wagon traffic to Iowa and further west had increased considerably. One correspondent in Peoria theorized it was due, in part, to the results of the most recent elections. 

As-Shaw-E-Qua (Singing Bird), widow of the distinguished war chief Black Hawk, died in the Sauk camp, on the Kansas River, on the 29th of August last, aged 85 years. (Notice they called Black Hawk a “war” not a “tribal” chief.)

1846007-12-30-2016

 

 

 

 

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There was a bribery scandal in the Iowa House of Representatives…

 
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Huldah Sloper, wife of Samuel Sloper of Centerville, Scott County, died of Typhus Fever on December 17th, 1846, at the age of 57. She was the mother of 17 children and grandmother of 38, most of who lived in Scott County. The family has a road named after them. 

Estate notices were posted for Lucius Moss, Robert Carleton, and Joseph Conway.

Genealogists know that it’s rare to find an obituary for a woman during this period. Deaths were not recorded in the state of Iowa until 1880; burial records, church death registers, and probates were the only proofs available.

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Happy birthday, Iowa!

 

(posted by Cristina)

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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