Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2014 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Davenport Fire Department: 1928 American LeFrance Hook and Ladder http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/31/davenport-fire-department-1928-american-lefrance-hook-and-ladder/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/31/davenport-fire-department-1928-american-lefrance-hook-and-ladder/ Thu, 31 Jul 2014 09:32:13 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One thing we have learned in Special Collections is to always look for glimpses of history in unusual sources. We recently caught such a glimpse courtesy of a minor traffic accident that occurred at 15th And Gaines Streets on August … Continue reading

One thing we have learned in Special Collections is to always look for glimpses of history in unusual sources.

We recently caught such a glimpse courtesy of a minor traffic accident that occurred at 15th And Gaines Streets on August 27, 1944 at 4:50 p.m. on an otherwise uneventful afternoon. No one was seriously injured and the cause of the accident was not contested.

Our excitement may seem strange, but our find involves the report and accompanying photographs for the accident—which involved a passenger car and a Davenport fire truck, for which we previously had no images and no information.

The truck was Hook and Ladder Truck No. 2 stationed at 1225 Harrison Street. It was an American LaFrance hook and ladder with 600 gallon-pump and 40-gallon chemical tank placed in service on March 22, 1928.*

Two views of the truck.Fire Truck Right 194.600Note the bell by the driver’s side in the photo above.

Fire Truck Left1944.600It appears to be leaking oil on the bottom. Also note the ladder and hose attached to the side from this view.

The Annual Report for the City of Davenport, Iowa 1944-45 indicates the truck was declared a loss from the damage sustained in the accident. It was replaced by a new Peter Pirsch Jr. 65 foot aerial truck.

We hope you enjoy this peek back at the Davenport Fire Department—and we reassure you, they were not to blame for the accident!

___________________________

*Annual Report for the City of Davenport, Iowa 1927-1928, Pg. 60.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Sweet Paul Eat & Make by Paul Lowe http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/sweet-paul-eat-make-by-paul-lowe/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/sweet-paul-eat-make-by-paul-lowe/ Wed, 30 Jul 2014 08:00:16 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe It began as a little blog highlighting the recipes and crafts of the Norwegian-born food and prop stylist Paul Lowe. Six years later, Sweet Paul is an online magazine followed by millions and a print quarterly sold nationwide in specialty stores. Praised by the New York Times as “a trove of seasonal delights”, it is […]

sweet paulIt began as a little blog highlighting the recipes and crafts of the Norwegian-born food and prop stylist Paul Lowe. Six years later, Sweet Paul is an online magazine followed by millions and a print quarterly sold nationwide in specialty stores. Praised by the New York Times as “a trove of seasonal delights”, it is turning heads with its easy, elegant food and style-setting aesthetic.

Divided into Morning, Brunch, Noon and Night, with color palettes to match, Sweet Paul Eat & Make includes breakfast dishes like Morning Biscuits with Cheddar, Dill and Pumkin Seeds and brunches like Smoke Salmon Hash with Scallions, Dill and Eggs. For lunch, there’s a super-quick Risotto with Asparagus and for dinner, Maple-Roasted Chicken and a stunning Norwegian specialty, The World’s Best Cake.

Rustically chic craft projects – paper flowers make out of coffee filters, a vegetable-dyed tablecloth and a trivet from wooden clothespins – will captivate even those who are all thumbs. (description from publisher)

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A Highly Unlikely Scenario by Rachel Cantor http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-highly-unlikely-scenario-by-rachel-cantor/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-highly-unlikely-scenario-by-rachel-cantor/ Tue, 29 Jul 2014 08:00:01 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe In the not-too-distant future, competing giant fast food factions rule the world. Leonard works for Neetsa Pizza, the Pythagorean pizza chain, in a lonely but highly surveilled home office, answering calls on his complaints hotline. It’s a boring job, but he likes it—there’s a set answer for every scenario, and he never has to leave […]

a highly unlikely scenerioIn the not-too-distant future, competing giant fast food factions rule the world. Leonard works for Neetsa Pizza, the Pythagorean pizza chain, in a lonely but highly surveilled home office, answering calls on his complaints hotline. It’s a boring job, but he likes it—there’s a set answer for every scenario, and he never has to leave the house. Except then he starts getting calls from Marco, who claims to be a thirteenth-century explorer just returned from Cathay. And what do you say to a caller like that? Plus, Neetsa Pizza doesn’t like it when you go off script.

Meanwhile, Leonard’s sister keeps disappearing on secret missions with her “book club,” leaving him to take care of his nephew, which means Leonard has to go outside. And outside is where the trouble starts.

A Highly Unlikely Scenario is a dazzling debut novel wherein medieval Kabbalists, rare book librarians, and Latter-Day Baconians skirmish for control over secret mystical knowledge, and one Neetsa Pizza employee discovers that you can’t save the world with pizza coupons. (description from publisher)

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The $50 Home Makeover by Shaunna West http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-50-home-makeover-by-shaunna-west/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-50-home-makeover-by-shaunna-west/ Mon, 28 Jul 2014 08:00:00 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Stunning and easy projects for less than $50 each! With The $50 Home Makeover, you can finally turn your living space into your home. This inspiring book offers 75 fun and creative ideas that will help give your place the stylish, modern look that you’ve always wanted – without having to spend a fortune. Each […]

$50 home makeoverStunning and easy projects for less than $50 each!

With The $50 Home Makeover, you can finally turn your living space into your home. This inspiring book offers 75 fun and creative ideas that will help give your place the stylish, modern look that you’ve always wanted – without having to spend a fortune. Each of these imaginative ideas cost less than $50 to bring to life and will beautify your space in unexpected ways. From an Antique Door Table to Reclaimed Wood Wall Art, each crafty home makeover project includes: step-by-step instructions with full-color photographs, a key to denote how long a project takes, how much it costs, and the level of difficulty and before-and-after photos of the finished product.

With the trendy yet inexpensive projects in The $50 Home Makeover, you’ll finally get to make those big improvements that you’ve been dreaming of, all while saving hundreds of dollars! (description from publisher)

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Living Landscape by Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/living-landscape-by-rick-darke-and-doug-tallamy/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/living-landscape-by-rick-darke-and-doug-tallamy/ Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:00:05 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe A home garden is often seen as separate from the natural world surrounding it. In truth, it is actually just one part of a larger landscape that is made up of many living layers. The replacement of the rich layers of native flora with turf grass greatly diminishes a garden’s biological diversity and ecological function. […]

living landscapeA home garden is often seen as separate from the natural world surrounding it. In truth, it is actually just one part of a larger landscape that is made up of many living layers. The replacement of the rich layers of native flora with turf grass greatly diminishes a garden’s biological diversity and ecological function. The Living Landscape seeks to reverse this trend by showing gardeners how to create a landscape that is full of life.

Written by Rick Darke and Douglas W. Tallamy, two of the most important voices in sustainability and horticulture, The Living Landscape is the definitive guide to designing a beautiful, biodiverse home garden. The authors first explain the layers of the landscape and what role the plants within them plays in the larger environment, from providing berries for birds, food for bugs, or a place for bees to pollinate. The authors then put this information into context and offer design strategies to implement in a home garden. Helpful charts suggest plants, including natives and nonnatives, for each region.

In a gorgeously illustrated, inspirational, and practical way, The Living Landscape supports the important message of biodiversity by showing gardeners how to make it happen. (description from publisher)

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Pop Quiz! Can you name these Davenporters? http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/24/pop-quiz-can-you-name-these-davenporters/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/24/pop-quiz-can-you-name-these-davenporters/ Thu, 24 Jul 2014 09:25:08 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections How many well-known Davenporters can you name? Most native Quad-Citizens can name a few local celebrities off the tops of their heads—Annie Wittenmyer? Rascal the River Bandit?–and many of us can recognize the names of historical Davenporters of note—Phebe Sudlow? … Continue reading

How many well-known Davenporters can you name?

Most native Quad-Citizens can name a few local celebrities off the tops of their heads—Annie Wittenmyer? Rascal the River Bandit?–and many of us can recognize the names of historical Davenporters of note—Phebe Sudlow? Antoine LeClaire?—when we see them on buildings, streets, and towns.

But can you name these important people by their photographs?

__________________________________

A.

_____

B.

_____

C.

_____

D.

Kathy Kirschbaum

_____

E.

_____

F.

_____

G.

________________________________

Need some help? 

Here are a few clues:

a. The son of the man who established the first school of chiropractic, this gentleman later brought the school into the International spotlight.

b. This woman was one of the highest-paid authors in America at a time when Mark Twain, a friend of hers, was still paying to have his stories published.

c.  U. S. Highway No. 6 in Davenport (and Bettendorf) was named after this Iowa State Senator in 1936.

d. The first—and so far, only—woman mayor of Davenport, Iowa.

e. Called Makataimeshekiakiak in his own language, this leader was born in Saukenuk, the main village of the Sac people on the Illinois Rock River, in 1767.

f. This reporter, playwright, and novelist went on—and east—to found the Provincetown Players with her husband (also a writer from Davenport), though she never forgot her Midwestern roots.

g. This young man could play the piano by ear at six years old. He went on to play another instrument, but never did learn to read music.

________________________________

How did you do?

Let us know in the comments!

________________________________

Answers:

ǝʞɔǝqɹǝpıǝq xıq—ƃ ؛llǝdsɐlƃ uɐsns—ɟ ؛ʞʍɐɥ ʞɔɐlq ɟıǝɥɔ—ǝ ؛ɯnɐqɥɔsɹıʞ ʎɥʇɐʞ—p ؛ʎlɹǝqɯıʞ ˙ʍ ˙p—ɔ ؛ɥɔuǝɹɟ ǝɔılɐ—q ؛ɹǝɯlɐd ˙ɾ ˙q—ɐ

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The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zeven http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-storied-life-of-a-j-fikry-by-gabrielle-zeven/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-storied-life-of-a-j-fikry-by-gabrielle-zeven/ Wed, 23 Jul 2014 08:00:01 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe A. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice […]

storied lifeA. J. Fikry’s life is not at all what he expected it to be. His wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and now his prized possession, a rare collection of Poe poems, has been stolen. Slowly but surely, he is isolating himself from all the people of Alice Island – from Lambiase, the well-intentioned police officer who’s always felt kindly toward Fikry; from Ismay, his sister-in-law who is hell-bent on saving him from his dreary self; from Amelia, the lovely and idealistic (if eccentric) Knightley Press sales rep who keeps on taking the ferry over to Alice Island, refusing to be deterred by A.J. s bad attitude. Even the books in his store have stopped holding pleasure for him. These days, A.J. can only see them as a sign of a world that is changing too rapidly.

And then a mysterious package appears at the bookstore. It’s a small package, but large in weight. It’s that unexpected arrival that gives A. J. Fikry the opportunity to make his life over, the ability to see everything anew. It doesn’t take long for the locals to notice the change overcoming A.J.; or for that determined sales rep, Amelia, to see her curmudgeonly client in a new light; or for the wisdom of all those books to become again the lifeblood of A.J. s world; or for everything to twist again into a version of his life that he didn’t see coming.

As surprising as it is moving, The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is an unforgettable tale of transformation and second chances, an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love. (description from publisher)

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry is also available for check out as a free ebook through the RiverShare Digital Library.

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Sous Chef by Michael Gibney http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/sous-chef-by-michael-gibney/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/sous-chef-by-michael-gibney/ Tue, 22 Jul 2014 08:00:40 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Chef Michael Gibney uses twenty-four hours to animate the intricate camaraderie and culinary choreography in an upscale New York restaurant kitchen. Here readers will find all the details, in rapid-fire succession, of what it takes to deliver an exceptional plate of food – the journey to excellence by way of exhaustion. Told in second-person narrative, […]

sous chefChef Michael Gibney uses twenty-four hours to animate the intricate camaraderie and culinary choreography in an upscale New York restaurant kitchen.

Here readers will find all the details, in rapid-fire succession, of what it takes to deliver an exceptional plate of food – the journey to excellence by way of exhaustion. Told in second-person narrative, Sous Chef is an immersive, adrenaline-fueled run that offers a fly-on-the-wall perspective on the food service industry, allowing readers to briefly inhabit the hidden world behind the kitchen doors, in real time. This exhilarating account provides regular diners and food enthusiasts alike a detailed insider’s perspective, while offering fledgling professional cooks an honest picture of what the future holds, ultimately giving voice to the hard work and dedication around which chefs have built their careers. In a kitchen where the highest standards are upheld and one misstep can result in disaster, Sous Chef conjures a greater appreciation for the thought, care, and focus that go into creating memorable and delicious fare.

With grit, wit, and remarkable prose, Michael Gibney renders a beautiful and raw account of this demanding and sometimes overlooked profession, offering a nuanced perspective on the craft and art of food and service. (description from publisher)

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Lost Lake by Sarah Addison Allen http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lost-lake-by-sarah-addison-allen/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lost-lake-by-sarah-addison-allen/ Mon, 21 Jul 2014 08:00:44 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe The first time Eby Pim saw Lost Lake, it was on a picture postcard. Just an old photo and a few words on a small square of heavy stock, but when she saw it, she knew she was seeing her future. That was half a life ago. Now Lost Lake is about to slip into […]

lost lakeThe first time Eby Pim saw Lost Lake, it was on a picture postcard. Just an old photo and a few words on a small square of heavy stock, but when she saw it, she knew she was seeing her future. That was half a life ago. Now Lost Lake is about to slip into Eby’s past. Her husband George is long passed. Most of her demanding extended family are gone. All that’s left is a once-charming collection of lakeside cabins succumbing to the Southern Georgia heat and damp, and an assortment of faithful misfits drawn back to Lost Lake year after year by their own unspoken dreams and desires. It’s a lot, but not enough to keep Eby from relinquishing Lost Lake to a developer with cash in hand, and calling this her final summer at the lake. Until one last chance at family knocks on her door.

Lost Lake is where Kate Pheris spent her last best summer at the age of twelve, before she learned of loneliness, and heartbreak, and loss. Now she’s all too familiar with those things, but she knows about hope too, thanks to her resilient daughter Devin, and her own willingness to start moving forward. Perhaps at Lost Lake her little girl can cling to her own childhood for just a little longer… and maybe Kate herself can rediscover something that slipped through her fingers so long ago. One after another, people find their way to Lost Lake, looking for something that they weren’t sure they needed in the first place – love, closure, a second chance, peace, a mystery solved, a heart mended. Can they find what they need before it’s too late?

At once atmospheric and enchanting, Lost Lake shows Sarah Addison Allen at her finest, illuminating the secret longings and the everyday magic that wait to be discovered in the unlikeliest of places. (description from publisher)

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Enduring Courage by John F. Ross http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/enduring-courage-by-john-f-ross/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/enduring-courage-by-john-f-ross/ Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:00:50 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe At the turn of the twentieth century two new technologies–the car and airplane–took the nation’s imagination by storm as they burst, like comets, into American life. The brave souls that leaped into these dangerous contraptions and pushed them to unexplored extremes became new American heroes: the race car driver and the flying ace. No individual […]

enduring courageAt the turn of the twentieth century two new technologies–the car and airplane–took the nation’s imagination by storm as they burst, like comets, into American life. The brave souls that leaped into these dangerous contraptions and pushed them to unexplored extremes became new American heroes: the race car driver and the flying ace.

No individual did more to create and intensify these raw new roles than the tall, gangly Eddie Rickenbacker, who defied death over and over with such courage and pluck that a generation of Americans came to know his face better than the president’s. The son of poor, German-speaking Swiss immigrants in Columbus, Ohio, Rickenbacker overcame the specter of his father’s violent death, a debilitating handicap, and, later, accusations of being a German spy, to become the American military ace of aces in World War I and a Medal of Honor recipient. He and his high-spirited, all-too-short-lived pilot comrades, created a new kind of aviation warfare, as they pushed their machines to the edge of destruction–and often over it–without parachutes, radios, or radar. Enduring Courage is the electrifying story of the beginning of America’s love affair with speed–and how one man above all the rest showed a nation the way forward. No simple daredevil, he was an innovator on the racetrack, a skilled aerial dualist and squadron commander, and founder of Eastern Air Lines. Decades after his heroics against the Red Baron’s Flying Circus, he again showed a war-weary nation what it took to survive against nearly insurmountable odds when he and seven others endured a harrowing three-week ordeal adrift without food or water in the Pacific during World War II.

For the first time, Enduring Courage peels back the layers of hero to reveal the man himself. With impeccable research and a gripping narrative, John F. Ross tells the unforgettable story of a man who pushed the limits of speed, endurance and courage and emerged as an American legend. (description from publisher)

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A “Brilliant Home Function”: the Modest Wedding of James Lane and Sophia Shuler http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/16/a-brilliant-home-function-the-modest-wedding-of-james-lane-and-sophia-shuler/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/16/a-brilliant-home-function-the-modest-wedding-of-james-lane-and-sophia-shuler/ Wed, 16 Jul 2014 11:13:15 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Sophia Caroline Shuler was the daughter of Charles Shuler, the president of the First National Bank of Davenport and the owner of several mines. Miss Shuler was a graduate of St. Katherine’s and the National Park Seminary in Washington, D.C., … Continue reading
Davenport Democrat, 13July1911, p.10

Davenport Democrat, 13July1911, p.10

Sophia Caroline Shuler was the daughter of Charles Shuler, the president of the First National Bank of Davenport and the owner of several mines. Miss Shuler was a graduate of St. Katherine’s and the National Park Seminary in Washington, D.C., and was active in the social circles of Davenport.

James Reed Lane was the son of respected lawyer Joe R. Lane, a partner in the respected Davenport law firm of Lane and Waterman* who was also a former congressman. Young Mr. Lane attended Exeter and the University of Iowa, before passing the bar and joining his father’s firm.

It’s no wonder that the Davenport Democrat used one and a half columns to describe, in effusive detail, their wedding, which took place on July 12, 1911, at the Prospect Terrace home of the bride’s parents, 1516 East River Drive.

Shuler bride3

This modest event, which was attended by three hundred guests,**  began at 8 o’clock, as the Criterion Orchestra started playing “The Bridal Chorus” from Lohengrin.

“The wedding ceremony was performed in the wide doorway leading from the hall to the library. Garlands of smilax combined with pink roses entwined the pillars to either side, and formed an arch overhead, while potted ferns and palms made an effective setting for the improvised altar in the doorway . . .”

Shuler bride2.jpg

“The bride was dressed in an exquisite creation of chantilly lace, over white satin, made with court train the panel front opening to one side showing the satin underdress. It was made with Dutch neck and short sleeves and the long wedding veil was caught in bando effect with fragrant orange blossoms. The bride’s only ornament was the diamond lavaliere, the gift of the groom, and her flowers with lilies of the valley in a shower bouquet.”

The Dutch Neckline, with barely visible diamond necklace.

The “Dutch neck”, with barely visible diamond necklace.

The couple was married by Reverend Robert Donaldson of the Presbyterian Church of Milwaukee,*** after which a reception was held in the library, presumably on some kind of rotation schedule to accommodate all the well-wishers.

Later, there was dinner and dancing on the lawn, on which a pavilion had been built and electric lights in globes had been installed, just for the occasion.

After a lengthy honeymoon trip to the “northern lakes”, the couple took up residence in the new home James Lane built for his bride at 324 Mississippi Avenue in east Davenport.

____________________

*Lane & Waterman LLP is still, to put it mildly, a respected Davenport law firm.

**It should come as no surprise that the surnames of the attendants and guests read like a Who’s Who of prominent families with local or political ties, notably McClellan, Von Maur, Pease, Norwood, and Ramsey (of the Des Moines Ramseys).

*** Reverend Donaldson’s father was the former pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Davenport. Dr. Donaldson also read for the service.

 

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My Gentle Barn by Ellie Laks http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/my-gentle-barn-by-ellie-laks/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/my-gentle-barn-by-ellie-laks/ Wed, 16 Jul 2014 08:00:08 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Ellie Laks started The Gentle Barn after adopting a sick goat from a run-down petting zoo in 1999. Some two hundred animals later (including chickens, horses, pigs, cows, rabbits, emus, and more), The Gentle Barn has become an extraordinary nonprofit that brings together a volunteer staff of community members and at-risk teens to rehabilitate abandoned […]

my gentle barnEllie Laks started The Gentle Barn after adopting a sick goat from a run-down petting zoo in 1999. Some two hundred animals later (including chickens, horses, pigs, cows, rabbits, emus, and more), The Gentle Barn has become an extraordinary nonprofit that brings together a volunteer staff of community members and at-risk teens to rehabilitate abandoned and/or abused animals. As Ellie teaches the volunteers to care for the animals, they learn a new language of healing that works wonders on the humans as well. My Gentle Barn weaves together the story of how the Barn came to be what it is today with Ellie’s own journey.

Filled with heartwarming animal stories and inspiring recoveries, My Gentle Barn is a feel-good account that will delight animal lovers and memoir readers alike. (description from publisher)

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On the Rocks by Erin Duffy http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/on-the-rocks-by-erin-duffy/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/on-the-rocks-by-erin-duffy/ Tue, 15 Jul 2014 08:00:59 -0500 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Ever since she was a little girl, Abby Wilkes dreamed of her wedding, the day when she’d wear a pretty white dress and look like a princess. . . . But that was before her life fell apart for the entire world to see. Her longtime boyfriend-turned-fiancé, Ben, unceremoniously dumped her – changing his status […]

on the rocksEver since she was a little girl, Abby Wilkes dreamed of her wedding, the day when she’d wear a pretty white dress and look like a princess. . . . But that was before her life fell apart for the entire world to see. Her longtime boyfriend-turned-fiancé, Ben, unceremoniously dumped her – changing his status to single on Facebook – while she was trying on the most gorgeous Vera Wang dress for the big day in On the Rocks by Erin Duffy.

Six months and twenty pounds later, the usual remedies–cupcakes, a freezer stocked with pints of Ben and Jerry’s, sweatpants, and a comfy couch–haven’t worked their magic. Worried about her best friend, Grace devises the perfect plan to get Abby back on her game. The two of them are going to escape sweltering Boston and its reminders of Ben and head to Newport for the summer. In a quaint rented cottage by the sea, the girls will enjoy cool breezes, cocktails, and crowds of gorgeous men. But no matter which way they turn, Abby and Grace discover that in this era of social media – when seemingly everyone is preserving every last detail of their lives online and prying eyes are everywhere – there is no real escape.

Truth to tell, dating has never been easy. But now that the rules have changed and the boundaries are blurred beyond recognition, will they ever find true love? And if they do, how can romance stand a chance when a girl’s every word and move can go viral with a single click? As the summer winds down to Labor Day, Abby will make some surprising discoveries – about love, men, friendship . . . and, most important, herself. (description from publisher)

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A Flood of Images: July 2014 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/10/a-flood-of-images-july-2014/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/10/a-flood-of-images-july-2014/ Thu, 10 Jul 2014 09:56:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We may have posted  The Flood of 1870: Bridging the gap between memories and measurements a bit too soon. Apparently, instead of celebrating no floods in 2014, we should have celebrated no spring floods. The summer flood of 2014 crested less than a week … Continue reading

We may have posted  The Flood of 1870: Bridging the gap between memories and measurements a bit too soon.

Apparently, instead of celebrating no floods in 2014, we should have celebrated no spring floods.

The summer flood of 2014 crested less than a week ago, on July 4th.  Its final measurement was 20.94 feet, making it the new #6 in the Top 10 Recorded Floods of the Mississippi River at Lock and Dam 15. The 20.71 crest of April 22, 2011 will drop to #7.

Below are flood photos taken during the crest. We attempted to get pictures in locations near those taken for A Flood of Images: April 2013 to allow for comparison—though, due to the higher flood stage and trees with inconvenient leaves, we occasionally had to move to nearby locations.

Looking west from the Arsenal Bridge, River Drive once again looks like a real river:017.River Drive West from Arsenal

The  Hesco barrier at corner of Iowa St. and River Drive:018.Corner Iowa Street and River Drive

Another view of the Hesco barrier, taken on Iowa Street, facing River Drive near Bechtel Park:038

The Dillon Fountain on the corner of Main Street and River Drive:077

The bench against the Figge Art Museum and a hint of fire hydrant on the corner of Main St. and River Drive:075

The Levee Inn – Locally famous for the flood crest markings recorded on the corners of the building:122

The LeClaire Park and Bandshell—please note that this is our first flood photo that includes the new Ferris Wheel at Modern Woodmen Park. 107

Modern Woodmen Park, walkway in place. Baseball will go on!

149

The corner of Warren and 2nd Streets:

176

Myrtle Street was barricaded at River Drive and the skate park was closed.

242

River Drive looking east from Sturdevant Street at Davenport City Cemetery:

202

This flood even reached several of the headstones at City Cemetery:

215

One last image of our 2014 Fourth of July crest is courtesy of Davenport Public Works:

027.Closeup flag and pipe at 2nd and River Drive

As always, we hope this is the last flood for a while. We love the Mississippi River. We love it best inside its own banks!

(post and photos by Amy D.)

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Mapping Early Churches http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/03/mapping-early-churches/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/07/03/mapping-early-churches/ Thu, 03 Jul 2014 09:31:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Early Davenport had a lot of two things: bars and churches. It would be difficult to document all the places that might have offered our citizens refreshments of an alcoholic nature prior to 1880; many of them didn’t exist long enough to … Continue reading

Early Davenport had a lot of two things: bars and churches.

It would be difficult to document all the places that might have offered our citizens refreshments of an alcoholic nature prior to 1880; many of them didn’t exist long enough to be listed in city directories—or the owners didn’t want them listed, in case the authorities came around asking about licenses—and drinking establishments weren’t often mentioned in local histories.

But churches and synagogues were listed in city directories—often for free—mentioned at length in local histories, and were likely to appear a variety of other resources.  And they often published histories of their own.

If one were to glean location information about these pre-1880 Davenport churches and synagogues from these sources and plug it into a map, it would look like this:


(click on a name on the list or a pin for information!*)

From a historian’s perspective, this is really cool.

From a genealogist’s perspective, this is really cool and may provide a solution to an-all-too-common problem: finding birth information for ancestors born before 1880.

Iowa first compiled birth records in 1880, so people born in our state before that year—and a little after, as the practice wasn’t enforced for several years—did not have them.  What many of them did have, however, was baptismal records, which include much of the same information, if not all, as government birth records.

Our library doesn’t have the records of all the pre-1880 churches in Davenport, but we do have the early records of a few and if you can identify the denomination of your ancestory, we may be able to help you locate where those records might be kept.

How cool is that?

 

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Sources:

“Some of our almost forgotten churches: a few edifices which have been abandoned.” Davenport Democrat and Leader , 23November1903, p.8

Fleming & Torrey.  Directory of the City of Davenport for 1856-57. [Davenport, Iowa: A. P. Luse and Co.], 1856

Davenport, Rock Island and Moline Directory 1858 & 59. [Davenport, Iowa: 1861 Tanner, Halpin & Co.], 1858

E. Coy & Co.’s Twin Cities Directory and Business Mirror for the year 1860. [Chicago, Ill: Luse, Lane and Co.], 1859

Brigham, A. D. Twin Cities Directory for 1861-’62. [Davenport, Iowa: Luse, Lane and Co.], 1861

Power, John C. and Collins, John W. Davenport City Directory for 1863. [Davenport, Iowa: Luse, Lane and Co.], 1863

Smallfield, A. G. and Bruning, Ludwig. Davenport City Directory for 1866. [Davenport, Iowa: Luse, Griggs], 1866

Root, O. E. Root’s Davenport City Directory. [Davenport, Iowa: Luse and Griggs], December 1866

Montague, A. J. and Curtis, J. F. Montague & Curtis’ Davenport City Directory for 1870-1. [Davenport, Iowa: Griggs, Watson, & Day], 1871

Davenport City Directory. [Davenport, Iowa: Griggs, Watson, & Day], 1873

Hawley’s Davenport City Directory1874-1875. [Davenport, Iowa: D. E. Hawley], 1874

Finger and Schmidt’s Business Directory for the year 1877. [Davenport, Iowa: Day, Egbert & Fidlar], 1877

Owen’s Davenport City Directory 1878. [Davenport, Iowa: F. E. Owen], 1878

1902-03 Stone’s Davenport City Directory. [Davenport, Iowa: H. N. Stone & Co.], March 1903

Polk’s Davenport City Directory 1919. [Davenport, Iowa: R. L. Polk & Co.], 1919

Davenport, Iowa. Council Proceedings 1919. p. 12359-62

Davenport, Iowa. Council Proceedings 1912. p. 9591

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*The map may not appear as intended in Internet Explorer.  You may wish to try another browser, such as Firefox or Chrome.

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Soldiering On: Local Veterans of “The Great War” http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/26/soldiering-on-local-veterans-of-the-great-war/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/26/soldiering-on-local-veterans-of-the-great-war/ Thu, 26 Jun 2014 08:00:55 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections June 28, 2014 marks the hundredth anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria, heir apparent to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose death launched a series of political events that culminated in world-wide war.  The date of his murder … Continue reading

June 28, 2014 marks the hundredth anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand of Austria, heir apparent to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, whose death launched a series of political events that culminated in world-wide war.  The date of his murder is officially recognized as the start of World War I.

The United States joined its allies on April 6, 1917, and, as usual, the men of Iowa answered the call of their country.

Of the many Davenport-area men who went to war, a few had their photographs taken in uniform by the Hostetler Photograph Studio:

dplx1534Harry Ward was a Captain in the Iowa National Guard when this photograph was taken.

According to the Davenport Democrat, which published his obituary on September 22, 1957, he was born June 8, 1882 in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, and came to Davenport in 1907 to work at the Rock Island Arsenal.

Captain Ward had previously served in the Spanish-American War and the Philippine War.  In January 1941, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier general in the National Guard of Iowa.

In civilian life, he was an alderman-at-large on the Davenport City Council and the Scott County representative in the state legislature. He was also elected Chief of Police from 1930 to 1934.

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dplx1535dArthur M. Compton was Lieutenant Colonel in the 1st Iowa Field Artillery.

Born in Davenport, he married Gertrude Whitaker in 1913.

According to his obituary, published on March 9, 1965, in the Davenport Times-Democrat, during World War I, he was an instructor in field artillery at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma.  He was later promoted to colonel, being the youngest one in the Army.

Based on information in a newspaper article published in the Davenport Democrat on January 9, 1919, Colonel Compton was for a time Davenport city engineer, though he later gave up his position to become engineer to the Levee Improvement Commission.

  ____

dplx1536Earl P. McGinley was Captain in the Field Artillery during World War I.

Based on information in his obituary, published in the Davenport Democrat on January 24, 1935, he was born November 19, 1891 in Victor, IA, but moved to Davenport when he was a young man. He married Irma Schreiber on November 18, 1916 in Davenport.

In 1917, he was sent to Beming, New Mexico to be an instructor at the training camp there.

 ____

dplx1512b

The only confirmed information we have on Earl Olsen is from his World War I Draft Registration Cards.

He was born on May 15, 1891 in Chicago, though he was living in Rock Island, Illinois when he joined the Army.  He served, at least initially, as a mechanic at Fort Sheridan, in Lake County, Illinois.

As we did not find an obituary for Mr. Olsen in our newspaper indexes, we searched for him in Soldiers of the Great War (SC 940.4 Sol), which was published by the Soldiers Record Publishing Association in 1920 and provides the names and photographs of the American soldiers who were killed in action or died of disease, wounds, or accident in World War I.

We were relieved that Earl Olsen does not appear among the Illinois soldiers who did not survive the War. If anyone knows any further details of Mr. Olsen’s life, please let us know.

 

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We Mustache This Question: The 1884 Davenport Police Department http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/18/we-mustache-this-question-the-1884-davenport-police-department/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/18/we-mustache-this-question-the-1884-davenport-police-department/ Wed, 18 Jun 2014 17:16:57 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections As we’ve mentioned before, this year marks the 175th anniversary of the Davenport Police Department.   In previous posts, we’ve shared some of the historical information and resources in our collections about and from the Department, and even cleared up … Continue reading

As we’ve mentioned before, this year marks the 175th anniversary of the Davenport Police Department.   In previous posts, we’ve shared some of the historical information and resources in our collections about and from the Department, and even cleared up a mystery or two.

But one mystery continues to elude us.

This photograph is of the 1884 Davenport police department, posed in front of the first station, which still stands at 130 West 5th Street.*

1894 Police DeptWhen we studied this beautiful image, we noticed something. All of the police officers have facial hair—most appearing to prefer mustaches of the handlebar variety—except for one.

See the third officer from the left, just past the tree?

1894 Police Dept lineupHis face is bare.

Along with this image, the photography studio—Hastings, White, and Fisher of Davenport—also did individual portraits of the officers.

It was easy to find our man:

1894 Officer 10Unfortunately, none of our resources list the badge numbers of officers, or provide physical descriptions. So we don’t know the name of the officer, nor will we ever know if his shaven state was a personal fashion choice, a physical limitation, or simply the visage of a new hire who hadn’t yet succumbed to peer pressure.

If our curiosity gets the better of us, we may do a brief search of our records for a rule about police officers being required to produce a mustache or beard within six months of employment.  But without a name, we won’t be able to search out city council minutes to see if this officer was given special dispensation.

Regardless, if anyone can help us identify this gentleman, or any of his fellow officers in the group photograph, we would be grateful for the information!

_________________________

*This building now houses Big Brothers, Big Sisters of the Mississippi Valley.

 

(posted by Sarah)

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The Scott County Unusual Sources Index http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/11/5453/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/11/5453/ Wed, 11 Jun 2014 14:30:30 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Back in the days of card catalogs, the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society created a name index to a wide variety of items available in the Special Collections Center. Dubbed the Scott County Unusual Sources Index (SCUSI for short), it … Continue reading

Back in the days of card catalogs, the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society created a name index to a wide variety of items available in the Special Collections Center.

Dubbed the Scott County Unusual Sources Index (SCUSI for short), it provides names pulled from a range of resources, from census schedules to Atlases, history books to sexton records, newsletters to church records—most of them off the usual research path and none of them particularly easy to search.

This index has proved invaluable to staff and patrons over the years. And now, due to the diligent efforts of volunteer Ellen Korn—who typed up drawers full of index cards—our researchers may now search SCUSI through our Center’s Free Local Database search engine!

Just type in a name and hit the “Search The Database” button”:

Free Local Database Screenshot

If you aren’t sure about middle initials or spellings, try the “Starts With” or “Contains” options to direct or broaden your search.

A list will appear of the number of times that name appears in each of our index databases (SCUSI is at the bottom):

Free Local Database Results Screenshot

SCUSI has 324 listings for “Smith”. Does that seem a little low to you?

Click the number link to pull up the results for a specific database:

SCUSI IMage

The first seven listings of 324 . . .

As you can see, the date,* source, and notes provide good information all by themselves, and the source location will assist you (or assist our staff in assisting you) in finding the source in which the surname appears.

All this, and you can search it from home, too!  Why not give it a try—and discover the kinds of Unusual Sources your ancestors got themselves into?

Thanks, Ellen!
We really appreciate your hard work!

___________________

*Psst:  If you ever see the current date in the third field (see the fourth listing?), don’t worry—that only means that there was no date available, so our system “helped” by filling in the blank. We’re currently trying to convince it to stop and we apologize for any confusion!

 

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In Their Own Words: D-Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/06/in-their-own-words-d-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/06/06/in-their-own-words-d-day/ Fri, 06 Jun 2014 08:00:37 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In 2001, our Special Collections Center was privileged to conduct oral history interviews with several area World War II veterans and others who were personally connected to the War, both home and abroad. On this 70th anniversary of D-Day, we … Continue reading

In 2001, our Special Collections Center was privileged to conduct oral history interviews with several area World War II veterans and others who were personally connected to the War, both home and abroad.

On this 70th anniversary of D-Day, we wanted to share the experiences of Michael Cervantes, an Army corporal and Iris Hetzler, a second Lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps.

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Michael Cervantes was drafted into the Army in February of 1943 at the age of 19 and served in the European Theater until 1945.  He and his unit were fresh from training when they were sent overseas.

“From beginning to end there was always, each soldier reacted differently. There were people that were really anxious to get over there and get started, do whatever needed to be done. There were people who didn’t say a word, did not mention the war or what might happen. And then there were those that were just frightened to death.”

“ . . . when we arrived [in June of 1944] we were just told that we were going to journey on south and eventually end up in England. Of course, when you’re a non-commissioned officer of low rank you really aren’t told very much. But later we learned that we had landed in Scotland. We really didn’t know where we were. And we’re boarded on to a combination of troop transport trucks and trains to get to our next training area, which was in England.

[We] had already received all of the training that we were going to get as far as what we were going to do with the equipment that we had. The training that we receive there was more the purpose of crossing the English Channel on whatever type of boat we were going to use . . . Even then we really did not know where we were going to land . . . We really didn’t have any new information of how much of France they had invaded and where they were positioned . . .  And all we knew we were going to board a transport ship but we really didn’t know we were going.

“ . . . the invasion was a big secret and even though the invasion happened before I went across the channel, it was still part of the first days of the invasion . . .

“[For] us, war still wasn’t something that we had experienced. We had only seen documentaries of past wars. My first awakening of the war was when I saw the first German tank that had been hit and that was on fire and that there were casualties, German casualties on the tank and around the tank. We tried to escape the fire of the tank and that was when I really knew what it was going to be like.

Well, we landed and met no resistance because whoever had landed before us had at least made it safe for us to land. So for us, we did not wade through water or not much water because we really did get in close to the shoreline. And we began our advance . . . We were really a half-track unit whose primary responsibility was aircraft. We were an anti-aircraft unit. My particular unit was a halftrack with four fifty-caliber machine guns on it. And our responsibility was really to position ourselves as the first outer ring of whatever we were supposed to defend be it a hospital, an ammunition dump, a food supply dump or whatever needed to be protected.

“ . . . We began in France in Normandy and then proceeded through Normandy. We went through central France. We went south of Paris. We went to, we traveled Luxembourg and then through Belgium and then we finally got to the German order. Of course we had met resistance through a lot of that country or countries that we traveled. But when we finally reached the German border and our first experience was the Sauer River and it was near the town of Sarbruken and then we met the heaviest resistance that we had in all of the war. We appreciated some of our engineering companies were able to put up pontoon or bailey bridges to cross the river but the Germans had that all planned and they would no sooner have the bridge up and ready to cross and they would blow it apart because they were on the other side just waiting for us to finish the job. So it was very difficult but we finally made it across and into German territory.”

For Mr. Cervantes, the Normandy invasion was only the beginning.  To read or hear more of his story, in his own words, please contact our Special Collections Center.

Iris Hetzler—the mother of Ann Hetzler, a librarian with the Davenport Public Library—graduated from St. Luke’s Hospital Training School for nursing in September of 1941. A member of the Red Cross, she joined the Army Nurse Corps in May of 1942. By 1943, she was serving in England as a second lieutenant.

“Our hospital in England was near Swindon. And Swindon was quite a railroad center, I think. It seemed like when the Germans came over to bomb London they kind of came in and made a turn over Swindon and the same was true when our fliers went out over the continent. They kind of came through there somehow. And we could tell the difference from the sounds of the engines which was which. But the night before D-Day…these missions would start maybe about dusk and end by midnight at least. And this time they went on all night. So we knew that the big day must be here.

“ . . . we knew D-Day was coming. We didn’t know when, but we knew it was coming. Everything was pointing to that. Those planes went on all night. And then, oh less than 24 hours we were receiving patients from the beaches, directly from the battlefield.  . . . Most of my patients were ambulatory until D-Day. And then we did begin to get patients. Usually not so badly injured or sick, but they weren’t ambulatory. And that made it difficult because we didn’t have the personnel to take care of them and do the KP that every ward had to do. So that was kind of tight. But each ward was a Quonset hut separate and they were connected by cement. In my area there was a wide enough cement area for an ambulance to drive down and then walks off of that, so that they could transport patients even by stretcher there . . . Then we turned the unit over then to another hospital and began to go overseas again . . .”

“They took us off the ship just as it was getting dark and we had to walk down a ladder to this LST, I think it was, that would take us into shore. That couldn’t even get all the way in. They let the front end and we’d wade in . . . But then there was supposed to be transportation there to move us . . .  But the transportation wasn’t there. And one male officer was left in charge to take care of things like that. So he said, well, you all stay here and I’ll go see what I can do. I remember Eleanor and I, everybody had been issued these so-called raincoats. I don’t think anybody ever wore them because they were heavy, stiff sort of thing. We took out our raincoats and one of us laid it in the sand. Then we laid down all cuddled up and covered up with the other one, because it gets cold at night. Slept for, I don’t know, a couple hours I guess. That was about as comfortable as we’d been for a while.

“Then they roused us up. It was dark, very dark. They hauled us around for two or three hours trying to find where we were supposed to be. I remember going through this one village. I could see it was in rubbles, but I could see a doorway with just a slit of light around it. It kind of bothered me.

“Finally our convoy stopped and the drivers all got out and conferred with each other and our driver says, “I don’t know where we are or where we’re going, but if we keep going that way we’re going to be on the front lines.” He was just really scared to death. And so was everybody else, because we could hear gunfire all the time.”

Over a hundred Nursing Corps personnel, including Mrs. Hetzler, were relocated several times for their own safety and later moved into Paris once it was freed by General Patton and worked in the hospitals there.

To read or hear more of Mrs. Hetzler’s story, in her own words, please contact our Special Collections Center.

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Our Special Collections Center has many Oral Histories available—many of them have also been transcribed. 

Please ask the Special Collections Staff if you would like to learn more about the experiences of local veterans in their own words.

______________________

Sources Used:

“Oral History Interview with Irish Hetzler.” (Interviewer:  Ann Hetzler), OH31-Hetzler, 21June2001

“Oral History Interview with Michael Cervantes.” (Interviewer:  Gaye Foster ), OH28-War, 19Jun2001.

 

 

 

 

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Feathered Hats and Juliet Caps: the Glaudel – Petrik Wedding http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/05/29/feathered-hats-and-juliet-caps-the-glaudel-petrik-wedding/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/05/29/feathered-hats-and-juliet-caps-the-glaudel-petrik-wedding/ Thu, 29 May 2014 16:02:57 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Eugenie M. Claudel married Francis Aloysious Petrik in Sacred Heart Cathedral at 8 o’clock on June 30, 1914. According to their Scott County marriage record, Miss Glaudel was 27 years old, and Mr. Petrik was 29. According to the wedding … Continue reading

Eugenie M. Claudel married Francis Aloysious Petrik in Sacred Heart Cathedral at 8 o’clock on June 30, 1914. According to their Scott County marriage record, Miss Glaudel was 27 years old, and Mr. Petrik was 29.

Petrik-GlaudelAccording to the wedding announcement, published in the Davenport Democrat on June 30, 1914, the attendants were Mr. and Mrs. Kerker—Mrs. Kerker was the bride’s cousin—and the ushers were Camille Lorraine, another cousin, and the groom’s brother, Fred Petrik.

The couple had their wedding photographs taken at the Hostetler Studios, and though these weren’t published in the newspaper, the article does offer a detailed description of the bride and the Matron of Honor that brings the image to further life:

dplx1105-2

“The bride was in a dress of white crepe de chine, made entraine , the deep tunic of Chantilly lace ending in a point over the train of white taffeta silk. The bodice was outlined with beaded chiffon and the long wedding veil of tulle was fashioned into a Juliet cap caught with clusters of flowers. The only ornament of the bride was a lavelierre of gold set with pearls and diamonds, the gift of the groom. She carried a bouquet in shower arrangement of white roses.”

As a lavelierre is a man’s cravat, we’re assuming that the writer of the article misspelled “lavalier“, which is a jeweled pendant that hangs from a chain or pin—if you look closely, you can see Mrs. Petrik’s necklace.

On first reading, there also seems to be an error—one hopes—in the description of the Matron of Honor’s outfit:

dplx1105-1

“Mrs. Kerker was in a gown of pale blue taffeta, the bodice of canary colored chiffon, the whole draped with white silk lace. Her hat was of white lace trimmed with a pale blue plume to match her gown and she carried a large bouquet of Shasta daisies and pink rose buds.”

Special Collections staff agrees, after searching some of our resources, that “canary” here doesn’t automatically mean yellow, as it would today, but instead canary blue, which was an expression in use at the time—and also goes much better with pale blue!

We also agree that Mrs. Kerker’s amazing plumed hat would have suited the bride much better than a Juliet cap, which to our modern sensibilities always tends to look like a shower cap with flowers stuck on, no matter who wore it.

To our relief, the article goes on to mention that the bride’s going away outfit, a “white serge suit with white lace bodice,” also included a “white panama hat trimmed in malline,” which sounds like a much better choice.

The couple went away for a month-long wedding trip, and later resided at 710 East Fifteenth Street, with the bride’s father, Peter Glaudel.

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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Red Knit Cap Girl to the Rescue!! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/01/29/red-knit-cap-girl-to-the-rescue/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/01/29/red-knit-cap-girl-to-the-rescue/ Wed, 29 Jan 2014 12:44:08 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog by Naoko Stoop Although children will not make the connection between a polar bear cub floating away from his family on a small chunk of ice and global warming, they will be mesmerized by the story of a young girl … Continue reading

by Naoko Stoop

Although children will not make the connection between a polar bear cub floating away from his family on a small chunk of ice and global warming, they will be mesmerized by the story of a young girl coming to his rescue.   Red Knit Cap Girl is the ultimate super hero – ready to spring into action and do what needs to be done.  That the author is an artist is evident in this beautifully illustrated story.  Pick it up for the artwork, stay for the story!

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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A symphony of emotion… http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/01/25/a-symphony-of-emotion/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/01/25/a-symphony-of-emotion/ Sat, 25 Jan 2014 15:06:23 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Don’t just read…  experience a selection from the Newbery Award winning Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.  A quartet from The Quad City Symphony will present their not-to-be-missed musical rendition at the Main Library on Saturday, February 8th at 11am … Continue reading

Don’t just read…  experience a selection from the Newbery Award winning Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis.  A quartet from The Quad City Symphony will present their not-to-be-missed musical rendition at the Main Library on Saturday, February 8th at 11am & 1pm.   See you there!!

 

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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