Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2017 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Life Unstyled: How to Embrace Imperfection and Create a Home You Love http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/life-unstyled-how-to-embrace-imperfection-and-create-a-home-you-love/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/life-unstyled-how-to-embrace-imperfection-and-create-a-home-you-love/ Tue, 25 Apr 2017 06:00:50 -0500 Brenda at Info Cafe If you enjoy perusing images of eclectic home furnishings used in creative ways, have I got a book to recommend to you!  Life Unstyled: How to Embrace Imperfection and Create a Home You Love by Emily Henson is filled with a wealth of full-color photos sharing the unique ideas of homeowners from varying parts[Read more]

If you enjoy perusing images of eclectic home furnishings used in creative ways, have I got a book to recommend to you!  Life Unstyled: How to Embrace Imperfection and Create a Home You Love by Emily Henson is filled with a wealth of full-color photos sharing the unique ideas of homeowners from varying parts of the world.

I like it because it left me with a feeling of validation of what I have always believed at the core: a home need not be a polished display of swanky décor to be great. It can be so much more gratifying to make your space uniquely your own, conforming to your way of being rather than try to live up to a magazine perfect ideal. After all, shouldn’t a home tell a story about the personality and life experiences of its residents?

Another thing I like about this book is that you don’t need an overabundance of time or money to borrow ideas from it and modify or incorporate them into your current living space. True, some of the homes pictured in the book are owned by buyers for textile or furnishings companies. I’m sure that definitely helps them gain access to the goods. But I think you will find that whatever your profession or station in life, there is a spark of an idea waiting inside this book somewhere for you.

If you are reading this blog, you are likely a fan of libraries and books. Let me share two ideas that will delight the book lovers. The first (pictured on the left) is featured in a warehouse-turned-residence in London. The owner has archive shelves (much like the kind used in our very own Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Department.) Here, they are used to divide the bedroom and the kitchen. They store everything from clothing to kitchen crockery and everything in between. You can see from the photo that the metal panels on the side are employed to display lots of pictures and artwork. Feel free to fall in love with this idea like I did,  just don’t ask me how to get rolling archive shelves into your home!

The second idea for book lovers is the vertical shelf featured in a bedroom (below). It looks like a floor-to-ceiling stack of books, but there are shelves in the middle of it all keeping it (hopefully) stable. This idea could be done relatively easily and cheaply in a variety of ways. Your imagination (and ceiling) would be the limit.

Happy home decorating! I’ll leave you with this quote: “The ache for home lives in all of us. The safe place where we can go as we are and not be questioned.”
― Maya Angelou, All God’s Children Need Traveling Shoes

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Photo Essay: Spring at Fairmount http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/photo-essay-spring-at-fairmount/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/photo-essay-spring-at-fairmount/ Mon, 24 Apr 2017 06:00:35 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe As you may know, the Davenport Library at Fairmount is bordered by the Davenport bike path on one side and backs up to the woods that line the path. With a wall of windows along the back wall of the library you are treated to a particularly beautiful backdrop no matter[Read more]

As you may know, the Davenport Library at Fairmount is bordered by the Davenport bike path on one side and backs up to the woods that line the path. With a wall of windows along the back wall of the library you are treated to a particularly beautiful backdrop no matter what the season. Right now the redbud and crabapple trees are in full bloom, everything is fresh and bright green and the birds are singing in full chorus. It’s really the best time of year. Come join us for a brief photo stroll of Spring at Fairmount.

All photos by Ann Hetzler. Taken April 22, 2017.

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Look Alike Day: The Putnam & Parker Buildings http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/21/look-alike-day-the-putnam-parker-buildings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/21/look-alike-day-the-putnam-parker-buildings/ Fri, 21 Apr 2017 16:20:25 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections April 20th is National Look Alike Day, and we’ve decided to share Davenport twins! Downtown Davenport has two buildings with similar facades: the Putnam building at 215 Main and the M.L. Parker building at 104 W 2nd. Here are some facts about … Continue reading

April 20th is National Look Alike Day, and we’ve decided to share Davenport twins!

Downtown Davenport has two buildings with similar facades: the Putnam building at 215 Main and the M.L. Parker building at 104 W 2nd. Here are some facts about each building: 

 

Putnam building

  • Year built: 1910
  • Address: 215 Main (2nd & Main)
  • Size: 8 stories high, 60 ft X 140 ft.
  • Use: Retail on 1st floor, the rest was an office building
  • Architect: D.H. Burnham & Company, Chicago
  • Developer: W.C. Putnam Estate
  • Davenport’s first skyscraper
  • Toilets: There were toilets for men on each floor. On the 8th floor there was a “special women’s toilet with a rest room”, which was a “new” feature in office buildings  

 

 

The M.L. Parker building

  • Year built: 1922
  • Address: 104 W 2nd (NW corner of 2nd & Brady St.)
  • Size: 7 stories, 108 ft X 142 ft
  • Use: M.L. Parker department store on 1st floor, the rest was an office building
  • Architect: Modified version of Burnham’s design
  • Developer: W.C. Putnam Estate
  • Built on the site of the LeClaire House Hotel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not exactly alike, but definitely in the same family!

 

Works Cited

About the Putnam Block. (2007, September 25). Quad-City Times, p. A2.

Brown, M. (1981, January 21). Parker Building bounces back. Quad-City Times.

(1983). Profile of the Parker Building. Davenport, Iowa: W.C. Putnam Estate.

Putnam Building. (1910). Davenport, Iowa: W.C. Putnam Estate.

Willard, J. (2003, January 10). Putnam Building has storied history. Quad-City Times, p. A2.

Work of Wreckers Proves Attaction: Many Watch Men Tearing Down Old Putnam Building. (1910, March 08). The Daily Times, p. 4.

 

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Question: Is the Movie Ever Better Than the Book? http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/question-is-the-movie-ever-better-than-the-book/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/question-is-the-movie-ever-better-than-the-book/ Fri, 21 Apr 2017 06:00:32 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Here’s the question – Have you ever thought that a movie was better than the book it was based on? This question is a little unfair – comparing books and movies is like comparing apples and oranges. They are very different media with very different user experiences; a 2-3 hour[Read more]

Here’s the question – Have you ever thought that a movie was better than the book it was based on?

This question is a little unfair – comparing books and movies is like comparing apples and oranges. They are very different media with very different user experiences; a 2-3 hour movie cannot possible capture the nuance of emotion or inner dialogue that a book can. Nor can a book show you sweeping vistas in full color (especially if it’s a landscape you’ve never experienced)

Most people would claim, strongly, that the book was better and for the most part, I agree. That doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy many of the movies based on books – movies have their own kind of magic and can often enhance the overall experience.

But there are some exceptions. A quick internet search brings up several articles with “better than the book” lists including these from Buzzfeed,  Bustle,  Hollywood.com,  and Purewow

It’s interesting to note that while there are some differences, most of the lists tend to agree on several titles including Forrest Gump, The Godfather, The Notebook, Jaws, The Princess Bride, Fight Club and Jurassic Park. This is often due to the creativity and vision of the director, or to careful editing of the original source material. It’s also enlightening to note that most of the books that these movies were based on were not hugely popular successes on their own, but considered fair to middling.

As for movies that enhance the book without insulting it, I would include movies such as the Harry Potter series, the Lord of the Rings movies and Master and Commander. And as much as I love to read Jane Austen, some of the Jane Austen adaptations are some of my favorite movies of all (I especially love the Emma Thompson version of Sense and Sensibility and the PBS version of Emma) In all of these cases, the beautiful settings, costumes and music contribute to and expand well-loved stories. (Although I still prefer the book!)

What about you – have you ever thought the movie was better than the book? Or thought that the movie caught the spirit of the book especially well? Tell us what you think!

 

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Little People, Big Dreams http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/little-people-big-dreams/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/little-people-big-dreams/ Wed, 19 Apr 2017 06:00:37 -0500 Brenda at Info Cafe I happened upon a charming series of books for children called Little People, Big Dreams. (Not to be confused with the TV series Little People, Big World.) These are picture book biographies of notable figures from different parts of history. I loved reading them and learning more about the protagonists along[Read more]

I happened upon a charming series of books for children called Little People, Big Dreams. (Not to be confused with the TV series Little People, Big World.) These are picture book biographies of notable figures from different parts of history. I loved reading them and learning more about the protagonists along with my children. The depictions of the heroines are captivating and, although they do not all have the same author and illustrator, they share an endearing similarity in style – large, round faces and colorful attire and settings.

I first read Frida Kahlo to my kindergartener. He came up with so many follow-up questions, I soon realized I didn’t know as much about this famous artist as I would like. I mentioned this to a friend and she insisted I should see the 2002 film Frida starring Salma Hayek as the title character and Alfred Molina as Diego Rivera. I did (alone), and enjoyed the sensual interpretation of the artist’s life.

Then an idea occurred to me. Wouldn’t it be nice to read a bedtime story for the kids and after they are fast asleep, read or watch something more adult on the topic? You know how a wine will sometimes be suggested that pairs well with your food? Couldn’t we do that with the books we read, as well? With that thought in mind, here are some recommendations you might want to try.

In Maya Angelou, author Lisbeth Kaiser and illustrator Leire Salaberria present to children the difficult topics of racism, domestic and sexual abuse, and mental health sensitively. Don’t let the fact that this book covers a difficult childhood deter you from reading aloud to your little ones what is a very inspiring story. Angelou’s story is, ultimately, one of hope. Most of us are aware of Angelou’s prolific career as a writer and civil rights activist, but how many knew her as a cook, streetcar conductor, dancer, singer, and world traveler? Share this inimitable woman’s story with the children in your life. Then on your own, read her classic I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings if you haven’t already done so (or even if you have, it may be time for a re-read). Also, listen to Angelou read her poetry in the book on CD entitled Black Pearls: The Poetry of Maya Angelou. I’d recommend the kids not be within listening range of this one, as there are vulgarities in it.

 

I will be the first to admit I am not a couture kind of gal (my style would more aptly be described as thrift store eclectic). Still, I enjoyed learning about Coco Chanel in the book written by Isabel Sanchez Vegara and illustrated by Ana Albero. Tired of seeing her contemporaries unable to breathe in their tight corsets, she designed clothing that was looser and easier to wear while dancing. She also designed hats and, of course, let’s not forget about the perfume. For more on the life of the woman once known as Gabrielle Chanel, you may wish to check out the 139-minute DVD Coco Chanel, a 2008 made-for-TV movie starring Barbora Bobulova as the young Chanel and Shirley MacLaine as old Chanel. You may also enjoy the coffee table style book Chanel: Collections and Creations by Daniele Bott. With 159 illustrations, it goes into delightful detail on Coco’s unique styles. My favorite was the chapter on the Camellia flower, which is pictured on the cover. Other chapters detail ‘The Suit’, ‘Jewelry’, ‘Fragrance & Beauty’, and ‘The Black Dress.’

All the suggested children’s books are from the Little People, Big Dreams series.There are more books in this series and you can find all the ones the library owns by doing a series search for Little People Big Dreams. If you have favorite books or movies that you think go together like Chardonnay and Gruyere, please let us know.

 

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Hole in the Heart: Bringing Up Beth by Henny Beaumont http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/hole-in-the-heart-bringing-up-beth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/hole-in-the-heart-bringing-up-beth/ Tue, 18 Apr 2017 06:00:51 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe Henny Beaumont’s Hole in the Heart: Bringing Up Beth was immediately relatable and bold in how it approached the subject of raising a child with a disability. This work of Graphic Medicine happens to be my first and it most certainly will not be my last. The editorial page notes[Read more]

Henny Beaumont’s Hole in the Heart: Bringing Up Beth was immediately relatable and bold in how it approached the subject of raising a child with a disability. This work of Graphic Medicine happens to be my first and it most certainly will not be my last. The editorial page notes that “For healthcare practitioners, patients, families, and caregivers dealing with illness and disability, graphic narrative enlightens complicated or difficult experience”. The are other titles in the Graphic Medicine series that may also interest you. Try The Bad Doctor: The Troubled Life and Times of Dr. Iwan James or My Degeneration: A Journey Through Parkinson’s.

Having an interest in medicine, I was struck by the double-entendre in the title. “Hole in the Heart” works on a couple of different levels. Quite literally, a hole in the heart in this case refers to an Atrioventricular Septal Defect (AVSD). Imagine the pain of giving birth to your child to discover that she likely has genetic heart problems that will require surgery.  Figuratively, the initial sense of loss, pain, or despair you experience is akin to having a hole in your heart. Even the subtitle “Bringing Up Beth” works on a couple of different levels. First, “bringing up” refers to raising someone from childhood to adulthood. Yet Beaumont is also bringing up the difficult subject of raising a child with special needs.  How would you react if a doctor (with the bedside rapport of a chair) approached you while you were holding your daughter for the first time only to inform you of the likelihood that she has Down’s Syndrome? And why does having Down’s Syndrome have to signify the sky falling or the end of the world? It simply does not.

The beauty of this book, and like the experience of reading books in general, is that you will see Beth and other people with Down’s Syndrome through the eyes of Hen. Sympathy–perhaps even empathy–is one powerful way reading helps creating understanding between ourselves and others who are different than we are. In one particular scene, Hen is making small talk with acquaintances who tend to tip-toe around the subject (Beth), in order to avoid talking about her as though she’s some kind of secret. Beaumont brilliantly pulls us into the conversation and shows us that referring to someone’s “Down’s baby” is disrespectful and callous. The appropriate and respectful way to refer to people with Down’s is exactly that: people who just happen to have Down’s.

As Beth matures, her family must grapple with the challenges of inclusion and acceptance in the classroom and beyond. What does true inclusion look like? Beth’s sisters joke that a school will utilize a picture of a student with Down’s just to appear inclusive in promotional and marketing materials; but truly embracing acceptance and inclusion looks and sounds different.  In another scene, Hen looks forward to meeting with Beth’s teacher. Just as you think the teacher is about to compliment Beth on her own terms, she instead gloats about “how TOLERANT” Beth’s classmates are (as though its her ability to be tolerated that makes her noteworthy.) You see the problem here: defining a person in terms of how they can be useful or tolerable for others (rather than being innately worthy in and of themselves) is de-humanizing and plain wrong.

I was working at the reference desk when I began discussing books with a patron. The topic of graphic novels came up. I mentioned that Hole in the Heart: Bringing Up  Beth  was  moving and that I cried while reading the last page of the book. The accompanying image (likely charcoal or pencil?) is beautiful–something many people can relate to. The patron looked perplexed. “You cried? ” he asked. The picture and sentiment simply embodied love & acceptance. “I did”, I replied.

If you’re skeptical that Graphic Novels can be emotionally complex and deeply moving, please read this book!

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Online Reading Challenge – “Comment allez-vous?”* http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-comment-allez-vous/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-comment-allez-vous/ Mon, 17 Apr 2017 06:00:16 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Bon jour! We’re halfway through the April Reading Challenge – have you found a good book set in Paris yet? There is no lack of excellent books (and movies) set in Paris, but if you’re still searching, here are a more couple of ideas. For non-fiction lovers, try Les Parisiennes[Read more]

Bon jour! We’re halfway through the April Reading Challenge – have you found a good book set in Paris yet? There is no lack of excellent books (and movies) set in Paris, but if you’re still searching, here are a more couple of ideas.

For non-fiction lovers, try Les Parisiennes by Anne Sebba which is about how the women of Paris survived the Nazi occupation during World War II. With few non-German men left in the city, it was the women who dealt with the Germans, making life or death decisions on a daily basis, just to survive. From collaborators to resistors, famous to ordinary, it’s a complex, fascinating story. Or try The Only Street in Paris by Elaine Sciolino who lives on Rue des Martyrs and shows you the charming, everyday world of Parisians away from the tourist sites.

Fiction readers should check out The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery just for the title alone but also because it’s a sharp look at the various lives of an elegant Parisian apartment building as observed by the concierge who is smarter and more sophisticated than anyone suspects. The Race for Paris by Meg Clayton is about three journalists who are following the American liberating forces in Normandy. If they can arrive in Paris before the Allies, they will have the scoop of their lives, but at what cost?

As for me, I’m finding the selection to be an embarrassment of riches – there are almost too many to choose from! However, my plan is to watch Coco Before Chanel starring Audrey Tautou (of Amelie fame) and to finish reading The Perfume Collector by Kathleen Tessaro but I’m also eyeing My Life in France by Julia Child. Obviously, I will be reading books about Paris long after April!

Now it’s your turn – what are you reading this month?

*”how are you?”

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Library Closed on April 14th http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-good-friday-3/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-good-friday-3/ Fri, 14 Apr 2017 06:00:20 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe The Davenport Public Library will be closed on Friday April 14 in observance of the city holiday. All of our locations will reopen on Saturday April 8 with their regular business hours of 9:00am to 5:30pm. Have a safe and happy holiday!

The Davenport Public Library will be closed on Friday April 14 in observance of the city holiday. All of our locations will reopen on Saturday April 8 with their regular business hours of 9:00am to 5:30pm.

Have a safe and happy holiday!

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In Memoriam: Patricia L. Scott http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/13/in-memoriam-patricia-l-scott/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/13/in-memoriam-patricia-l-scott/ Thu, 13 Apr 2017 16:17:51 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Staff at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center are saddened by the loss of our friend. Pat Scott passed away on Sunday, April 9th, 2017 at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf, Scott Co. Iowa.  Patricia Louise (Bracker) Scott was born … Continue reading

Staff at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center are saddened by the loss of our friend. Pat Scott passed away on Sunday, April 9th, 2017 at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf, Scott Co. Iowa. 

Patricia Louise (Bracker) Scott was born December 27, 1932 in Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa. Her parents were Harold H. and Charlotte Louise (Lorrain) Bracker. She married Harold Wayne Scott on June 6th, 1953 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Davenport.

Bracker family portrait by Free, Oct 1951 (standing in back row on the left)

She attended Immaculate Conception Academy and Marycrest College, graduating in 1964 with a Bachelor of Elementary Education. Pat taught 3rd grade at Lourdes Memorial School (1960 – 1968) and Grant Elementary School (1968 – 1988).

Mrs. Scott’s 3rd grade class at Grant Elementary School, 1976-77

Pat was a long time volunteer at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center: working the desk, helping patrons with their genealogy questions; compiling indexes for social events published in the Quad-City Times; working with St. Anthony’s Catholic Church Records and Cemetery Records for Pine Hill Cemetery. A retired teacher, she taught beginning genealogy classes at the library for many years. Pat was one of the original charter members and past president of the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society, founded on October 30th, 1973, and was named SCIGS Volunteer of the Year in 1998.

 

National Volunteer Week, April 1996

Pat donated many items from her personal collection to the library. When her health kept her away from the library, she was a frequent caller to the Center. Staff looked forward to her calls and hearing about what she was working on. She will be missed.

(posted by Cristina)

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The Return of the Doctor http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-return-of-the-doctor/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-return-of-the-doctor/ Wed, 12 Apr 2017 06:00:04 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hello Fellow Whovians! I am happy to report that the long wait is over – Doctor Who returns to BBC America on Saturday April 15! Hooray! This will be Peter Capaldi’s last season as the Doctor and Steven Moffat’s last season as the main writer and showrunner, plus there’s a[Read more]

Hello Fellow Whovians!

I am happy to report that the long wait is over – Doctor Who returns to BBC America on Saturday April 15! Hooray! This will be Peter Capaldi’s last season as the Doctor and Steven Moffat’s last season as the main writer and showrunner, plus there’s a new companion this season. Lots of changes coming for our favorite Time Lord!

Of course, change is nothing new for Doctor Who – the show is brilliant at reinventing itself season after season, changing to keep up with current tastes yet remaining essentially at its core the story of the Doctor, a survivor and explorer of the Universe, zipping around in his time traveling TARDIS (it’s bigger on the inside!), chased by Daleks and Cybermen. And who is not opposed to stopping and helping various aliens and cultures (and time periods) on his journey, always with a faithful companion or two in tow. There’s a lot of humor in this series, but there’s also a lot of depth and heart.

Doctor Who has been a mainstay of British television since it premiered in 1963. When the original Doctor, William Hartnell became ill and could no longer work, the producers came up with the idea of having the character “regenerate”, allowing a new actor to take over. This turned out to be a brilliant move, keeping the series running almost continuously since then and allowing each actor to bring his own interpretation and personality to the show. The show slipped in popularity, ending in 1989 but was revived 2005. It’s been embraced by old and new fans and is now enjoying some of it’s greatest popularity.

Interested in jumping aboard this crazy train? (It’s tons of fun) The library has DVDs of all of the series including the originals. I recommend that you start with the “modern” series by watching a season when a new Doctor is introduced – the Ninth Doctor (series 1), the Tenth Doctor (series 2), the Eleventh Doctor (series 5) or the Twelfth Doctor (series 8). This way you are introduced to the “rules” of this series at the same time as the new Doctor, who is just as confused and bewildered as you are as he adjusts to his new body and gets back his memories. There are also the Christmas episodes (a British Christmas is listening to the Queen’s Speech in the morning and watching the Doctor Who Christmas Special in the evening!) and the excellent 50th anniversary special The Day of the Doctor.

The library also has novelizations, graphic novels and fan guides. It’s a fandom that just keeps giving!

So, here’s a question that can set off endless debates: who’s your favorite Doctor? I love Ten (played by David Tennant and most people’s favorite) but Eleven (Matt Smith) is my favorite. (Actually, the TARDIS is my absolute favorite character!) Who is your favorite doctor? Favorite episode? (“Vincent and the Doctor” maybe, or “Blink”?) Favorite villan? (Weeping Angels? The Silence?) Join the conversation!

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Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michaelangelo, & Me by Ellen Forney http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/marbles-mania-depression-michaelangelo-me/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/marbles-mania-depression-michaelangelo-me/ Tue, 11 Apr 2017 06:00:22 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe In the past few years, I think it’s safe to say I’m hooked on graphic novels! I don’t make it out of the library on most days without bringing at least 1 new title home to read (though I usually bring a bag-full!). Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michaelangelo, & Me initially jumped[Read more]

In the past few years, I think it’s safe to say I’m hooked on graphic novels! I don’t make it out of the library on most days without bringing at least 1 new title home to read (though I usually bring a bag-full!). Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michaelangelo, & Me initially jumped out at me, like so many graphic novels do, because of the colorful artwork on the cover; but Ellen Forney’s  frank, funny, and painful reckoning with the depression & mania that accompany Bipolar disorder is honest, brave, and thought-provoking.  For the skeptics who doubt that graphic novels can be emotionally complex & deeply moving, try reading Hole in the Heart: Bringing up Beth, a 2016 work of graphic medicine about raising a daughter with Down’s Syndrome.You won’t find a summary of Forney’s autobiographical memoir here: just read it for yourself.

I don’t know anyone who isn’t touched by mental illness in some capacity, either through personal experience or knowing or loving someone who struggles–often silently-with bipolar or another mental illness. Yet it’s still an elephant in the room or–if not an elephant–some other misunderstood creature who looks a lot like your neighbor, sister, boyfriend, or cousin. Forney’s autobiographical sketch even compares identifying people who suffer from bipolar with “outing” someone –the often intentionally cruel practice of shining a light in a calculated way in order to  “expose” someone as unusual or different.  But Marbles is a victory in the fight to de-bunk the myth that people with mental illness are certifiably “crazy”, “scary”, and “dangerous”. A graphic novel like Marbles  is another step in the right direction of normalizing and de-stigmatizing mental illness. These is a genuine, candid representation of mania and depression.

One of the defining themes in this work is the interplay between madness & creativity.  Would treatment of her newly-diagnosed illness hamper her creative energy? Would treatment change or dull her creative identity? It is certainly a terrifying thought to consider that medications may not only not work, but they may change an essential part of who you are–an essential part that you may not want to change.  Forney discovers, like so many others, that should she “join the ranks” of those artists who came before her who also suffered with bipolar disorder (historically referred to as manic depression), she would find herself in good company. Great company, even. Truth be told, there is such comfort to be found in placing yourself along a continuum–of knowing of the others who came before you.  Through the act of reading, Forney also found comfort, reprieve, and solidarity. An Unquiet Mind by Kay Jamison, for example, is a particular book that was mentioned within the pages of Marbles. Forney does not sugarcoat the profound sense of loneliness she felt as she cycled in and out of mania and depression.

This book will invite you to contemplate the controversial issues surrounding mental illness, including diagnosis (misdiagnosis is notoriously  a major cause of harm and medical error in the united states), medication, other modes of treatment (alternative & complementary therapies such as yoga).  A particularly intriguing insight related to Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT), a treatment modality that enables people to improve their symptoms by recognizing and challenging or calling-out the negative self-talk cycles that are a cornerstone of mental illness. Although Forney didn’t delve particularly deeply into this aspect of the memoir, it is clearly an essential part of her road to finding balance and stability in her life (and ultimately even coming to terms with wanting to find balance in the first place).  Keep in mind, this graphic memoir never claims to offer medical advice but rather is the testament of the author.

Ultimately, this book highlights Forney’s experience living with bipolar illness in a way that is especially human: raw, passionate, sanguine, and vulnerable. I was heartened by the author’s resolve throughout and by the last page and I think you will be too.

 

 

 

 

 

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Someday We’ll Go All the Way http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/someday-well-go-all-the-way/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/someday-well-go-all-the-way/ Mon, 10 Apr 2017 06:00:00 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe A sure sign of spring – baseball is back! The national pastime has returned with (and I never thought I’d get to say this so I’m going to savor it) the defending World Series Champions Chicago Cubs (yeah, the thrill of saying that is never going to fade!), an early[Read more]

A sure sign of spring – baseball is back! The national pastime has returned with (and I never thought I’d get to say this so I’m going to savor it) the defending World Series Champions Chicago Cubs (yeah, the thrill of saying that is never going to fade!), an early favorite to repeat.

Like any sports team that wins a championship, a new crop of books about the team soon pop up as publishers rush to take advantage of the excitement and interest. Most of the time – for 108 years actually – Cubs fans haven’t had a reason to look for books to relive a great season. All of that has changed now and books about the 2016 team and their epic World Series run are arriving. Here is a sampling:

Three titles that came out shortly after the World Series highlight the season. Won for the Ages by the Chicago Tribune only goes through the National League Championship Series; both 2016 World Series Champions from Major League Baseball and Believe It by the Chicago Sun Times include the World Series. All are packed with photos and stats and the ups and downs of 2016.

A Season for the Ages by Al Yello is more in-depth and looks at how the Cubs built a team that could break the drought. Just arrived is The Cubs Way by Tom Verducci which also looks at the winning Cub formula, concentrating especially on Theo Epstien (president of baseball operations) and Joe Maddon (manager) and the strategies they followed to create a team.

Coming soon is The Plan by David Kaplan, also about Epstein and Maddon’s baseball strategies (it’s safe to say that baseball managers everywhere are studying these ideas very carefully!), My Cubs: a Love Story by NPR’s Scott Simon and Teammate: My Life in Baseball, a biography by David Ross, one of the key Cub players, now retired (and on Dancing with the Stars!) It’s safe to say there’s plenty to read during rain delays and travel days!

The Cubs home opener is tonight; they’re going to raise the World Series banner (I still get chills saying that) and there’s sure to be lots of pomp and circumstance and happy tears (and maybe Bill Murray in the stands?) Someday has come and we went all the way – let’s do it again!

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It’s Opening Day at Modern Woodmen Park Stadium, thanks to the Depression-era Dreams of the Davenport Levee Commission http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/06/its-opening-day-at-modern-woodmen-park-stadium-thanks-to-the-depression-era-dreams-of-the-davenport-levee-commission/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/06/its-opening-day-at-modern-woodmen-park-stadium-thanks-to-the-depression-era-dreams-of-the-davenport-levee-commission/ Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:47:27 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Opening Day for local baseball is here! Yes, the Quad Cities River Bandits* will battle the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers tonight at the historic Modern Woodmen Park stadium as our minor league baseball season officially begins. In honor of the 2017 … Continue reading

Opening Day for local baseball is here! Yes, the Quad Cities River Bandits* will battle the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers tonight at the historic Modern Woodmen Park stadium as our minor league baseball season officially begins.

In honor of the 2017 season, we thought we would look back at the early history of Modern Woodmen Park.

Baseball has been a popular sport in Davenport since the mid-1800s. Over time, baseball associations developed to help organize baseball games between local cities. In 1901 a new organization formed when the Davenport River Rats became a charter member in the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League (also known as the Three-I League).

Davenport played in the Three-I League through the 1916 season. Over the years the team was known as the Davenport River Rats, Davenport Riversides, Davenport Knickerbockers, Davenport Prodigals, and Davenport Blue Sox.

Changes within the Three-I League led the Blue Sox to leave the franchise after the 1916 season. It wasn’t until 1929 that the Davenport Blue Sox reorganized and joined the Mississippi Valley League. With few large baseball fields in Davenport, the Blue Sox used a field at the Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds for home games.

Fans soon discovered the fairgrounds baseball field was lacking in modern amenities compared to Douglas Park in Rock Island and Browning Field in Moline. Its distance from downtown Davenport was another mark against it, as fans had to spend money on public transportation or extra gas for their vehicles to attend games.

By early 1930, the Davenport Blue Sox’s managers, the Davenport Baseball Club, began to worry that the outdated field would threaten the team’s place in Mississippi Valley League.

With an interest in keeping baseball in the city, the Davenport Levee Commission stepped in to help fill the need for a new modern stadium.

On September 17, 1930 the Davenport Levee Commission authorized the construction of a municipal stadium with a preliminary cost estimate of $60,000. The initial plan was for a baseball park, a football field, practice softball/baseball fields, tennis courts, and playgrounds to be built. The complex would occupy the property between Gaines Street and LeClaire Park, and from the railroad tracks to the riverfront.

Close proximity to downtown Davenport, easy access from Rock Island and Moline, and the potential to create a large parking area were among the benefits touted by the Levee Commission.

With lights for night games, the stadium would allow the Blue Sox to compete with other teams in their franchise whose stadiums had been similarly updated.

In the announcement for what they then called the Municipal Stadium, the Davenport Levee Commission made it clear the stadium was not being built for baseball only. It was intended as a recreation center for the citizens of Davenport to enjoy year-round.

The Levee Commission pushed to start building the facility before plans were even finalized. Mr. Walter Priester, secretary, stated, “One of the paramount reasons for immediate work on the stadium is to give employment to many in Davenport.” With the beginning of the Great Depression, employment opportunities were scarce, and the Levee Commission wanted to put as many local men to work as possible.

Ground was broken on the project in early November of 1930. The Levee Commission quickly decided to increase the budget by $100,000 to provide for a more permanent grandstand and work along the riverfront.**

The dedication of the Davenport Municipal Stadium was held on May 26, 1931, at the start of the first afternoon baseball game. With the increase in cost to build a more substantial grandstand, all other planned recreational areas were put on hold. Also on hold was the idea to build a park area running from the baseball stadium west to Credit Island.

Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 27, 1931. Pg. 22

That afternoon, the Davenport Blue Sox beat the Dubuque Tigers in a score of 7 to 1.

The first night game was held on June 4, 1931. Over 3,000 spectators came to watch Davenport play against Rock Island under the glare of lights mounted on six 100-foot steel towers. One can imagine that even the Blue Sox’s loss that night did not diminish the excitement of watching an illuminated night game. It was reported that the glow of the lights could be seen from miles around.

Since 1931, the stadium has hosted numerous events including baseball games, football games, boxing matches, local junior Olympics, concerts, circuses, and more.

Municipal Stadium c. 1934 during WPA Project #11 – 02-05-1934.

 

Seawall and Levee. March 30, 1934. Vol. #13 dpl2003-14b1f8d

Expansions over the years added more seating to the stadium and modernized existing features. The name of the structure was also changed over time. In 1971, it became known as the John O’Donnell Stadium, and in 2007, the Modern Woodmen Park.

What may you expect to find at the ballpark in 2017? Grandstand, bleacher, or berm seating, a children’s area, an enormous Ferris wheel, fabulous ballpark food, an amazing river view, and, of course, outstanding baseball.

87 years ago, the Levee Commission dreamed big on baseball and Davenport. We hope you stop by this summer to see the amazing results!

(posted by Amy D.)

*The Quad Cities River Bandits are a Class A minor league baseball team affiliated with the Houston Astros.

**The official cost from the April 1, 1930 – March 31, 1931 Levee Commission report to the Davenport City Council was $136,385.97.

Resources

  • Burlington Gazette (IA), March 23, 1929. Pg. 12.
  • Davenport Daily Democrat and Leader, September 17, 1930. Front Page.
  • Davenport Daily Times, November 13, 1930. Pg. 12.
  • Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 27, 1931. Pg. 22.
  • Davenport Daily Times, May 26, 1931. Pg. 13.
  • Davenport Daily Times, June 5, 1931. Pg. 24.
  • Annual Reports of the City Officers of the City of Davenport 1930 – 1931 by the City of Davenport, Iowa. Published 1931. SC352.0777 DAV
  • Baseball at Davenport’s John O’Donnell Stadium by Tim Rask. Published 2004. SC796.357 RAS
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Walking Matches: A nineteenth century competitive sport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/24/walking-matches-a-nineteenth-century-competitive-sport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/24/walking-matches-a-nineteenth-century-competitive-sport/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:15:01 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We have written about the competitive spirit of early residents of Scott County, Iowa in the past. From an early running bet to bike races, the residents of Scott County were always game to try new things. So it’s no … Continue reading

We have written about the competitive spirit of early residents of Scott County, Iowa in the past. From an early running bet to bike races, the residents of Scott County were always game to try new things. So it’s no surprise a new competitive sport of the past caught our attention this week.

Walking Matches, also known as Pedestrian Matches, became a fad during the 1860s (starting about 1861, but interest only picked up in the United States after the Civil War) through the mid-1880s. Competitive walking was an international obsession with large competitions being held in major cities across Europe. Thousands of onlookers in larger cities paid to watch walkers compete in one of two ways:  a set number of miles in the shortest time or the longest distance in a set amount of time.

Davenport, and Scott County, quickly took up the Walking Match fad. A notice in the Davenport Daily Gazette, from May 5, 1868 proclaimed a Walking Match would be held on May 9th at the Scott County Fairgrounds with the distance set at 10 miles. (Pg. 4) Who won, you ask? As the match was postponed due to rain, we aren’t sure who the winner turned out to be- or if the match was held at all.

Davenport Daily Gazette, May 5, 1868. Pg. 4

By 1876, the Davenport Daily Gazette advertised on the front page on November 4, 1876 that the German Theatre in Davenport would be the site of a great walking match between John J. Geraghty of St. Louis and John Oddy of Philadelphia. The men were competing in a 14-mile walking race. 

Davenport Daily Gazette, November 4, 1876. Pg. 1

Mr. Geraghty and Mr. Oddy were most likely professionals on the Walking Match circuit and traveled from city to city competing. Most professional winners took home money put up by the sponsors and also received part of the gate receipts.

Amateur competitions also abounded in Davenport and other local cities. The Davenport Daily Gazette posted on March 25, 1879 that an amateur walking match was to be held at the German Theatre, starting at midnight the following night, with John Bowlsby, of Tipton, Iowa, and William B. Logan and C. E. Muhl, both of Davenport. (Pg. 4)

According to the follow up story on March 27, 1879, a professional walker, Prof. E. E. Miller, walked with the three amateurs:  Mr. Bowlsby, Mr. Logan, and Mr. Muhl. The three amateur competitors vied for a silver hunting watch, while Prof. Miller earned a portion of the ticket sales if he completed his agreed upon 100 miles in 22 hours. At midnight on March 27th  300 hundred spectators watched the start of the race. (Pg. 4)

Great detail in the news article described Prof. Miller: he was 23 years old, about 5’10” tall, and 150 pounds. He wore a stripped woolen shirt, blue knee breeches, stockings, and light shoes. It was noted he wore no hat.

The length of the sawdust covered indoor track was 176 feet, and one mile equaled 30 times around. The competition continued until 10:00 p.m. the following night. The Davenport Daily Gazette on March 28, 1879 reported that, during the event, lively music was played as attendance grew smaller in the afternoon but picked up again at night.

Prof. Miller walked from midnight until 4:14 a.m. when he rested for one hour, and by 3:43 p.m. he was on his 72nd mile. He finished his 100 miles in 21 hours, 57 minutes, and 30 seconds after resting for only 2 hours and 59 minutes during the entire event. He accomplished the task with 2 minutes and 30 seconds to spare!

As for the amateurs, Mr. Bowlsby walked from midnight until 6:30 p.m, when he left the race. He walked the entire time with only one 15-minute rest and completed 76 miles and two laps. Mr. Muhl retired about 6:15 p.m. having achieved 74 miles. Mr. Logan completed his 50th mile – and the competition- at about 1:30 p.m.. He retired from the event and did not return. Consequently, Mr. Bowlsby received the silver hunting watch in the amateur division. 

After the conclusion of the race, Prof. Miller challenged Madame DuPree, a professional Pedestrienne as the women were called, to a race. She later accepted and the two took part in a four day event held in Rock Island, Illinois in late April 1879. (Pg. 4)

Walking Matches continued into the early 1880s in Davenport and surrounding areas. Slowly, as the international crowd drifted away from the sport, local interest followed suit. But once upon a time, individuals could gain local fame simply by walking – and walking some more.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Irish Resources for your St. Patrick’s Day Perusing Pleasure http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:41:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources. Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:     AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!) Irish Genealogy Tool … Continue reading

Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources.

Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:

 

 

AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!)

Irish Genealogy Tool Kit

IrishCentral

Irish Genealogy.ie

 

 

Have you ever wanted to take a closer look at the Book of Kells? Check out the digitized book from Trinity College Dublin. 

 

 

In our Collections: 

Local Ancient Order of Hibernians


 

 

Can you believe the Grand Parade has been going on for 32 years?! The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center has a number of early posters for the parade in our Ephemera collection.

Image courtesy of Our Quad Cities

 

Interested in local Irish-American stories? The 2007-2008 Iowa Stories 2000 topic brought out local individuals with great stories to tell. Their oral histories are archived here as well.

 

 

The Celtic Heritage Trail of the Quad-Cities was an active local organization in the early 2000’s. Their records contain a good deal of Irish history and lore. Available from our Archive & Manuscript Collection. 

 

Come visit us for all of your Irish genealogy and history research needs!

 

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An Exciting Find: Iowa death records, 1921 – 1940 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/10/an-exciting-find-iowa-death-records-1921-1940/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/10/an-exciting-find-iowa-death-records-1921-1940/ Fri, 10 Mar 2017 12:14:11 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One of the roadblocks we frequently run into while helping patrons with genealogy and local history research is a gap in Scott County death records from 1921 – 1940. During that time, death records were maintained by the State of Iowa and … Continue reading

One of the roadblocks we frequently run into while helping patrons with genealogy and local history research is a gap in Scott County death records from 1921 – 1940.

During that time, death records were maintained by the State of Iowa and no copy kept by Scott County. We are still able to locate individuals from obituaries, cemetery records, and other sources most of the time. Death records, though, tend to have important names and dates. Many times patrons wrote to the State to receive a copy of their ancestor’s death certificate- for a small fee.

We were surprised, and extremely excited, to find this week that FamilySearch now has the missing death certificates from 1921 – 1940 on their website in digital form!

To find the information, go to FamilySearch.org

and look under Iowa records…

for Iowa, Death Records, 1921 – 1940.

You still need to contact the Iowa Department of Public Health to receive a certified death certificate, but for general research, the digitized version is incredibly useful.

Even more useful, FamilySearch.org is a free website!

(posted by Amy D.) 

 

 

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Digital Learning Day in the Archives http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/23/digital-learning-day-in-the-archives/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/23/digital-learning-day-in-the-archives/ Thu, 23 Feb 2017 17:31:24 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In honor of Digital Learning Day, the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is highlighting HeritageQuest, one of the Davenport Public Library’s research databases. There’s a wealth of genealogical information to explore and you can access it from home, for free, with your library card! How to … Continue reading

In honor of Digital Learning Day, the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is highlighting HeritageQuest, one of the Davenport Public Library’s research databases. There’s a wealth of genealogical information to explore and you can access it from home, for free, with your library card!

How to get there:

From the library’s home page (davenportlibrary.com), click on ‘Research Tools’ and select ‘Online Resources’ from the drop-down menu.

research

Next, select ‘Genealogy and Local History’ from the ‘View by Subject’ list in the drop-down menu under ‘All Online Databases.’

genlocal

Choose the ‘HeritageQuest Online’ link.

heritagequest

Just click on the green ‘Begin Searching’ button to start discovering family history documents!

begin

You can search or browse U.S. Census Records, city directories, the 1850 and 1860 Slave Schedules, U.S. Indian Census Rolls, and more!

search

Check it out! Learn what online digitial treasures the Davenport Public Library has for you on Digital Learning Day 2017!

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Presidents’ Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/17/presidents-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/17/presidents-day/ Fri, 17 Feb 2017 15:58:17 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections On “Presidents’ Day” George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are usually the first to be recognized, and quite logically so, since both were born in February. However, the spirit of the day can be broadened to include more “Presidents” of the … Continue reading

On “Presidents’ Day” George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are usually the first to be recognized, and quite logically so, since both were born in February. However, the spirit of the day can be broadened to include more “Presidents” of the past.

 

In November 1910, President Theodore Roosevelt made a visit to Davenport’s VanderVeer Park. The Music Pavilion was crowded with onlookers as Roosevelt addressed his constituents from the stage.

presidents

Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2003-09    Photograph by J.B. Hostetler

 

President Woodrow Wilson was saluted by the boys from Battery B as he rolled into Iowa on the train across the Government Bridge in early 1916.

presidents2

Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2001-24               Photographer unknown

 

Speaking of trains, a pair of Roosevelts addressed a Davenport crowd from one in a 1936 campaign stop. President Franklin D. Roosevelt and First Lady Eleanor earned a second term in the White House, defeating Republican nominee Kansas Governor Alfred Landon in that election.

presidents3

Image Source:  Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center Davenport Public Library Photograph Collection VM89-000844

 

President Jimmy Carter and First Lady Rosalynn arrived in Davenport August 21, 1979 aboard a different type of transportation – the Delta Queen Riverboat! Speaking of Riverboats, (and coming full circle) who remembers “The President”?

presidents4

Image Source:  Archive & Manuscript Collection #2009-19           Copyright Karen Deneve Clevenger Moline, IL

 

For these and many other interesting items, drop by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center! But don’t come on Presidents’ Day. . . We will be closed for the holiday!

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An Unfortunate Valentine’s Day Blog http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/14/an-unfortunate-valentines-day-blog/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/14/an-unfortunate-valentines-day-blog/ Tue, 14 Feb 2017 12:48:58 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections While researching recently, we came across what looked like a wonderful Valentine’s Day blog about love. It was only while doing further research we found it was more a case of love gone wrong. On February 6, 1920 The Davenport … Continue reading

While researching recently, we came across what looked like a wonderful Valentine’s Day blog about love. It was only while doing further research we found it was more a case of love gone wrong.

On February 6, 1920 The Davenport Daily Times ran a lovely article about a local wounded soldier from the Great War who married his nurse.

Mckay Wedding

The Davenport Daily Times, February 6, 1920. Pg. 2

Young William McKay had left Davenport after enlisting in the United States Army on April 5, 1918. In July of that year, he was sent overseas to the battlefront as a member of the Transportation Corp 308. He was injured a short time later when the truck he was driving overturned and trapped him beneath it.

Mr. McKay was badly wounded and transported to the military hospital in Brest, France for recovery. His most serious injury being a crushed right leg that would never regain mobility. He also developed a leaking heart problem after the accident.

It was at this hospital he met a nurse named Mary Ward who had been caring for soldiers in Brest since July of 1918. Coincidentally, her parents had relocated to Davenport from Wisconsin while she was overseas caring for wounded patients.    

According to the article, as Mr. McKay was transferred to different hospitals during his recovery, Miss Ward managed to be transferred with him.

Mr. McKay was officially discharged from the U. S. Army on April 30, 1919 while recovering at Mercy Hospital in Davenport.

On January 31, 1920 the couple took out a marriage license in Scott County, Iowa. William McKay, 28 years old, and Mary Ward, 35 years old, were married February 2, 1920 at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church in Davenport. Their marriage license indicated it was the first marriage for both.

McKay Wedding License 1

SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage. #1479413

McKay Wedding License 2

SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage. #1479413

They were expected to reside after the wedding with her parents in Davenport.

We all thought it was a wonderful story and the next step was to look into records to track the couple over the years. We quickly realized something was wrong. In the 1920 census, taken in late spring of that year, William McKay is listed as single and living with his mother in Davenport. There was no trace of the Ward family.

Our first thought was his new bride had died in the influenza epidemic that had occurred in late winter/early spring in Davenport. But no death was found in the records.

What we did locate was a petition for divorce filed by William McKay on March 6, 1920 in the local newspaper. The reason for the divorce being Mr. McKay had found out on March 4th that his wife was still married and that husband was living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

We turned to Ancestry.com for further information and found that Mary Ward had married a George McNitt in 1897 in the state of Wisconsin. We were able to locate the couple living together in Beloit, Wisconsin with her parents in the 1900 United States Census.

We then found Mr. McNitt in the 1910 United States census in Beloit with a new wife named Emma. They married in 1906.

Could this all have been a misunderstanding we wondered?

Then we located a marriage record from Kane County, Illinois. Mary Ward had married a William J. Borsdorf on June 16, 1910.

We are unable to find Mary or William J. Borsdorf in the 1910 census, but we did find William’s WWI Draft Registration card from 1917, which lists his wife’s name as Mary. Mr. Borsdorf was living in Milwaukee, Wisconsin at the time.

We then find Mr. Borsdorf in the 1920 United States census listed in Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a boarder in a house. He is listed as married, but no wife is listed with him.

We believe William J. Borsdorf is the husband that William McKay learned of on March 4, 1920.

We did not find a final divorce record for William and Mary McKay. We did find a case number and District Court docket number. We believe, based on other cases we have read about, that the marriage was considered void (or “set aside” using a term we find in newspaper accounts of the period) as the divorce petition was filed just over 30 days after the marriage vows were taken and that she was married to someone else.

A search of local police records find no charges were filed against Mary for bigamy.

To make things even more unusual, we find in the 1930 United States census that Mary had returned to William Borsdorf and they were living together as husband and wife in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

They remained together in Milwaukee until Mr. Borsdorf died on March 30, 1948. Mary died on September 9, 1956. They were buried next to each other in Holy Cross Cemetery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

As for William McKay, he never remarried. In another twist, after Mr. McKay’s mother passed away he moved to a Veterans Hospital probably due to his injury and heart problem. We find him living there in the 1930 and 1940 United States census records.

Where was the hospital located? Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Mr. McKay passed away on August 31, 1948. His body was returned to Davenport where he was buried in Holy Family Cemetery.

His obituary in The Davenport Democrat and Leader stated he was never married.

References:

  • The Davenport Daily Times, February 6, 1920. Pg. 2
  • SC Microfilm 977.769 Marriage – #1479413
  • The Davenport Daily Times, March 9, 1920. Pg. 8
  • The Davenport Democrat and Leader, September 1, 1948. Pg. 13
  • Ancestry.com

(posted by Amy D.)

 

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In Memoriam: Dudley Bell Priester http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/02/in-memoriam-dudley-bell-priester/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/02/02/in-memoriam-dudley-bell-priester/ Thu, 02 Feb 2017 16:40:34 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Dudley Bell Priester was born January 18, 1923 in Davenport, Iowa to Oscar and Helen (Bell) Priester. According to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, his father was vice-President of Priester Construction Company and his mother owned a gift shop. The … Continue reading

Dudley Bell Priester was born January 18, 1923 in Davenport, Iowa to Oscar and Helen (Bell) Priester. According to the 1930 U.S. Federal Census, his father was vice-President of Priester Construction Company and his mother owned a gift shop.

The family lived at 2745 Wood Lane in the McClellan Heights neighborhood in East Davenport. Dudley attended Davenport High School and, later, Lawrenceville Prep School in New Jersey from 1939-1941, where he was captain of the wrestling team. He then went to Princeton University in the fall of 1941.

NameDudley Bell Priester School Lawrenceville School Year 1941 Ancestry.com. U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010. Original data: Various school yearbooks from across the United States.

Name Dudley Bell Priester
School Lawrenceville School
Year 1941
Ancestry.com. U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2010.
Original data: Various school yearbooks from across the United States.

He graduated in 2 years so he could go into the Civil Engineering Corps of the Navy. He served in the 111th and 56th U.S. Naval Construction Battalions stationed in the South Pacific during WWII.

After leaving the Navy, he started working at his father’s company, Priester Construction, but his first construction job was the administration building at the Rock Island Arsenal in 1939. Priester was in charge of the construction of the Davenport Public Library building designed by architect Edward Durell Stone that was completed in 1968. He was also responsible for the Modern Woodmen of America office in Rock Island, the foundation construction at Alcoa, and many other local projects.

Priester married Jean Elizabeth Hansen in March 1947 and had 5 children: Bill, Nancy, Ted, Charlie and Mary. They lived in a mansion at 49 Hillcrest Avenue from 1954 – 2012, before downsizing to a condominium at the Carriage Club.

Priester served on the board of the Quad City Symphony Orchestra, Davenport Museum of Art, and Putnam Museum, was a member of the Master Builders of Iowa, and served as President of the Outing Club and the Town Club. He was a stamp collector and loved to wear a bow tie, preferring the Churchill (blue with white polka dots)

Dudley Bell Priester passed away January 23, 2017 at home.

posted by Cristina

Works Cited

Davenport, Scott, Iowa, United States; county district courts, Iowa. “Dudley Bell Priester.” 20 January 1923. “Iowa, County Births, 1880-1935,” database, FamilySearch. 20 May 2016. <https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V4X4-JPD>.

“Dudley Bell Priester.” Quad-City Times 26 January 2017: A8.

“Iowa, World War II Bonus Case Files, 1947-1954 [database on-line].” n.d. Ancestry.com. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/8825/41912_329333-02569?pid=222074>.

Jensen, Julie. “Priester constructing a pretty interesting life.” The Leader 05 December 2003: B6.

Lawrenceville School. The Lawrenceville Olla Podrida. Ed. Jr., William Howard Stoval. Lawrenceville,: Class of nineteen hundred and forty-one, 1941. 01 February 2016. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/1265/43134_b194783-00179?pid=305260181>.

Speer, Mary Louise. “Davenport library celebrates 40 years.” Quad-City Times 06 October 2008: B1.

United States of America, Bureau of the Census. “Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930.” 21 April 1930. Ancestry.com. 01 February 2017. <http://interactive.ancestrylibrary.com/6224/4584438_00484?pid=31704095>.

Wundram, Bill. “Bow tie wearers bow to nobody.” Quad-City Times 25 August 2010: A2.

—. “Noted Q-C mansion yields treasures.” Quad-City Times 25 September 2012: A2.

 

 

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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