Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2018 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Happy Summer 2018 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/happy-summer-2018/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/happy-summer-2018/ Fri, 22 Jun 2018 06:00:32 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe It’s summer at last (although it has felt like summer for several weeks now!). Time to kick back and relax and spend some quality time with a good book. Still looking for a great beach read (or lazy-laying-in-the-hammock read)? The Daily Beast has a list of the best summer reads[Read more] Click to view slideshow.

It’s summer at last (although it has felt like summer for several weeks now!). Time to kick back and relax and spend some quality time with a good book.

Still looking for a great beach read (or lazy-laying-in-the-hammock read)? The Daily Beast has a list of the best summer reads of 2018 that ranges from thriller, to tear-jerker to in-depth investigation. Or try the list of 40 Summer Beach Reads from Woman’s Day, books that are a couple years old and easier to find. And NPR published this list of 100 Best Beach Books Ever which, really, can just become your “to-read” list for any time of year.

And, because it’s summer, take some time to get outside (maybe with a book in hand?). Next time you’re at Eastern I highly recommend that you take a walk around the prairie gardens that surround the building. As you can see from the pictures here (which I took yesterday), it has become quite colorful and beautiful. Not pictured is the birdsong, the sense of peace and calm, and the open skies. Well worth a visit!

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The Paris Opera on DVD http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-paris-opera-on-dvd/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-paris-opera-on-dvd/ Wed, 20 Jun 2018 06:00:33 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe I love taking a peek behind the scenes of anything creative – movies, fashion, art, crafts. I love to see how the magic is made, the skill and passion and focus that goes into creating something special. If you feel the same be sure to check out The Paris Opera[Read more]

I love taking a peek behind the scenes of anything creative – movies, fashion, art, crafts. I love to see how the magic is made, the skill and passion and focus that goes into creating something special. If you feel the same be sure to check out The Paris Opera on DVD.

The Paris Opera follows new director Stephane Lissner as he navigates through his first season at the world famous art institution. The Paris Opera actually comprises two major venues, the opulent Palais Garnier and the more modern Opera Bastille as well as schools and training centers for both opera and ballet plus extensive craft workshops. Ballets, operas and concerts are regular events at both locations and require intense coordination on multiple levels. Amidst this controlled chaos, Lissner must negotiate politics, strike threats, wage disputes, replacing key personnel at critical times and, after a massive bull is hired to appear in an opera, calm the fears of the chorus who will be on stage with him.

The film focuses on what goes on backstage, long before and after a show is presented. The rigorous training the ballet dancers undergo, the auditioning of a new, young opera singer, the hammering out of new choreography, the building of sets and sewing of costumes. The Paris Opera relies heavily on new technology – lights run by computers, for instance, but also the more traditional skills – wig making, costumes, makeup. You see very little of any performances, just glimpses and usually from the wings of the stage – the utter exhaustion of a ballet dancer after she has finished her solo, the opera singer soaked with perspiration trying to make herself presentable before taking her bows, the lighting director singing along with the singers on stage, the maids who clean, the chorus practicing just before going on stage, the cleaning and ironing of the costumes. It is an endless cycle of creation and recreation and while talent plays a part, it is mostly possible through hard work and dedication.

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A Day In The Life of Marlon Bundo http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-day-in-the-life-of-marlon-bundo/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-day-in-the-life-of-marlon-bundo/ Tue, 19 Jun 2018 06:00:36 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe Every once in awhile, you come across a book that is not only well-written, but that had the potential to be revolutionary. A Day In The Life of Marlon Bundo is one of those books, especially because it is a bold, humorous, and heartening tribute to “any bunny who has ever felt[Read more]

Every once in awhile, you come across a book that is not only well-written, but that had the potential to be revolutionary. A Day In The Life of Marlon Bundo is one of those books, especially because it is a bold, humorous, and heartening tribute to “any bunny who has ever felt different”.  Similarly, it is also a jab at the “Stink Bugs” of the world who don’t understand how others can lead lives unlike their own.  Check out this video of the reading, too!!

Most appropriately, this book is hot-off-the-press and just in time to hit the shelves for Pride Month, a national observance during the month of June. I am proud to work in a public institution that not only celebrates but encourages people to learn about and embrace people whose lives look differently from theirown. This wonderful book acknowledges and honors the LGBTQA community and its allies through recognizing same-sex marriages as legitimate and valid, in spite of  public figures and politicians who use their platform to discourage them.

In short, Marlon Bundo is a hula-hooping male rabbit who happens to favor the company of Wesley, another male rabbit. Marlon Bundo also lives with his Grandpa — the Vice President–who happens to be Mike Pence,  the current Vice President of the United States. When Marlon Bundo and Wesley decide that they would like to marry,  they are scornfully told that their relationship would not be recognized by law or by “The Stink Bug”, who is depicted as a lead decision-maker who is “In Charge” although he is “very stinky.” The Stink Bug tries to proclaim that “Boy Bunnies Have to Marry Girl Bunnies”; but Marlon Bundo and Wesley knew differently, that the Stink Bug’s vision is simply near-sighted and skewed.  To the astonishment of Marlon Bundo and Wesley, many of their peers come forward and begin to share how they are different from what the Stink Bug says is “normal.”  For example, Pumpernickel, the badger, eats his sandwiches crust-first while a hedgehog, Dill Prickle, reads the end of the book before the beginning!

By the end of the book, the community votes and agrees that two male rabbits should be able to marry if they love each other and want to spend their lives together because, essentially, “it doesn’t matter if you love a girl bunny or a boy bunny, or eat your sandwich backward or forward” as “stink bugs are temporary” and “Love is forever.”

Authors Marlon Bundo and Jill Twiss have written an important book that acknowledges and celebrates our differences.

 

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Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/americanah-by-chimamanda-ngozi-adichie/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/americanah-by-chimamanda-ngozi-adichie/ Mon, 18 Jun 2018 06:00:18 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe I listened to this book on my last road trip and after I returned to work, I discovered that it was one of PBS’s Great American Reads! (Check out the Library for a display of these books or look online for a printable list of all 100 books. You can also vote[Read more]

I listened to this book on my last road trip and after I returned to work, I discovered that it was one of PBS’s Great American Reads! (Check out the Library for a display of these books or look online for a printable list of all 100 books. You can also vote for your favorite at any Davenport Library location.) I was already trying to read my way through as many of those books as I could,  so I was happy that I had stumbled upon Americanah  and that I could check this book off my list!

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the story of race, identity, and struggling to find yourself both away from home and at home. Ifemelu and Obinze fell in love when they were very young, living in military-ruled Nigeria. Both Ifemelu and Obinze were attending a Nigerian university when a series of university strikes began. Without a solid education and no other real plans in motion, Ifemelu and Obinze decided to leave the country.

Ifemelu decides to leave Nigeria and head to America. She and Obinze work out a plan. Once he finishes school, he will leave Nigeria and come to her. In America, Ifemelu has academic success, but struggles to fit into black America. This novel wonderfully describes the African experience and how it differs between the USA, England, and Nigeria. Ifemelu may have found her way at an American university with academic success, but she struggles with understanding the differences between what is accepted in America vs what was/is accepted in Nigeria. To help her cope, Ifemelu decides to start a blog that talks about race issues in America. Obinze’s life is complicated in a different way. Not being able to head to America, he instead moves to England and ends up becoming an illegal immigrant. His journey is complicated like Ifemelu’s and he struggles to find himself amongst a country that wants to send him back home.

Flash forward years and Ifemelu and Obinze find themselves in the same country again, trying to deal with past resentments, hurt feelings, and denials. Their current lives are under scrutiny as they each try to juggle their foreign selves with accepted culture and identity standards in place in Nigeria. Reuniting in newly democratic Nigeria after years abroad, both Ifemelu and Obinze have issues to work through as they deal with their new selves, the new Nigeria, and the unique relationship/reunited passion between each other and their native homeland. Some issues are spoken, while others lie under the surface only called out when they directly influence others in the open. These cultural subtleties make up a vast swath of this book and the author is adept at bringing them to light. This is fiction with a message, yet the message is conveyed in an appealing and socially conscious way.

This book takes a deep look at race and immigration, specifically the intricacies of race and how that experience is different between the USA and Nigeria. In frequent conversations throughout this novel, readers are given a glimpse into what it means to be black in Africa and what it means to be black in the USA. The author takes readers on a tour of various countries as seen through the eyes of Ifemelu and Obinze. Their life stories play out over many years and many countries as they both struggle to find themselves amongst countries who value the same culture in different ways.

I recommend listening to this book. While it may take you a little bit to understand the accents like it took me, I ultimately felt like it was worthwhile. The accents allowed me to fully engage with the book and realize that I was gaining a glimpse into a culture entirely different from mine. When I finished listening to this book, I realized that if I had read a print copy, I would have lost the accents completely, would have probably given the characters an incorrect accent, or would have imagined the characters with only slight accents. There really is something positive to be said about listening to books with narrators who really know how to correctly portray the characters.


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This Day In History: Roller coaster crash at Forest (Schuetzen) Park http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/17/this-day-in-history-roller-coaster-crash-at-forest-schuetzen-park/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/17/this-day-in-history-roller-coaster-crash-at-forest-schuetzen-park/ Sun, 17 Jun 2018 12:00:03 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections On Sunday, June 17th, 1923, a near record crowd of 3,640 people attended the annual basket picnic of the Davenport lodge No. 28, Loyal Order of Moose at Forest Park. Attendees enjoyed a program of games and outdoor sports, including … Continue reading

On Sunday, June 17th, 1923, a near record crowd of 3,640 people attended the annual basket picnic of the Davenport lodge No. 28, Loyal Order of Moose at Forest Park.

Attendees enjoyed a program of games and outdoor sports, including a baseball game between married men and single men, horseshoe pitching, a guessing contest, and athletic contests, with prizes for the winners donated by Davenport businesses. The Moose 36-piece band put on a concert that afternoon. 

At 8:15 pm, a horrifying scene unfolded on the figure eight roller coaster, advertised as “the largest and safest west of Chicago”. The first car made it over the first dip and was almost to the top of the second incline, 45 feet above the ground, when it started slowing down, came to a stop, then slid backwards to the bottom of the dip and partly up the opposite slope. The car slid forward again and up the incline for a short distance and backwards once more, finally coming to a stop in the bottom of the dip. The second car, which had been released a few seconds before, crashed down into the first car, injuring 10 people.

The Daily Times, Monday, June 18, 1923, p.1

The victims and their injuries: 

Mary Taylor, age 16, suffered severe injuries to her head.

Amy Taylor, age 18, was knocked unconscious in the crash, had a bruise on her forehead and a lacerated leg.

Woods Taylor, age 29, had a broken nose and bruises on his arm and leg.

Charles Forgie, age 18, had bruises and cuts on his leg and several teeth knocked out. 

Loretta Thompson, age 16, bruised her jaw.

Robert Montague suffered from shock and was slightly bruised.

Duncan Estes, age 13, was bruised and had a cut on his knee.

Frances Whitaker suffered from shock and bruises.

An unidentified boy, age 10, sprained his ankle after jumping off the second car and falling 15 feet to the ground.

Daniel O’Connor, a heavyset man,  had scratches and slight bruises after jumping from the second car, landing on a trestle which gave way under his weight, then falling 10 feet onto another projection. 

The coaster was inspected the next afternoon by building commissioner Ed McCoy, who found a bent axle on the first car, which would account for it failing to make the grade. Safety clutches were ordered to be installed as well as an automatic device that would indicate to the starter when the first car had passed the second big dip before releasing the second car.

Davenport Democrat and Leader, Monday, June 18, 1923, p. 1

This was not the first roller coaster accident at Forest Park. On Sunday, July 31st, 1921 at 8:35 pm, 7 people were injured when the first car failed to make a slight grade on the final rise onto the platform and slid backwards, swaying back and forth on the dip until a second car crashed into the rear of the first. That wasn’t enough to stop the amusements for the evening because two hours later another person was injured in a second accident exactly like the first. A broken brake shoe on one of the cars was to blame for these two incidents. 

The victims and their injuries: 

Fred Sirike, hands bruised.

Andrew Sirike, hands and chest bruised.

Eva Isenhart, sent to Mercy Hospital with serious body bruises.

Laura Kile, sent to Mercy Hospital with serious body bruises.

Fred Fick, injuries to the head and body

Richard Peters, minor bruises

Frances Buttgren, minor bruises.

Bertha Kreneheller, foot injured

The figure eight roller coaster at Forest Park, formerly and currently known as Schuetzen Park, opened on Sunday, June 20th, 1920, during the festivities for the 68th Anniversary of the Davenport Turners. The amusement park was  managed by Tobe Watkins, who still had eight years left on his ten year lease from the Davenport Shooting Association. 

The coaster itself was built and operated by the Davenport Coaster company, which was incorporated on May 4th, 1920 by three men from Rockford, Illinois: Charles O. Breinig, president; H. S. Burpee, vice president; and Paul Stick, secretary and treasurer. The company spent $15,000 on amusement devices at Forest Park.

The amusement park closed after Labor Day in 1923. The grounds had been sold to the Chiropractic Psychopathic Sanitarium Co. on May 1st of that year, and the inn, bar room, bowling alley, and music pavilion had already been converted into living quarters for patients and attendants. Manager Tobe Watkins had been allowed to continue his lease for the summer to give Davenporters one more season at the old amusement park.

The Roller coaster was torn down by the City in October 1926 as it was deemed a menace to public safety. 

The Davenport Democrat And Leader, Monday, August 16, 1920, p. 32

Read more about Schuetzen Park

 

(posted by Cristina)

__________________________________________________

Works Cited

3,640 Attended Moose Picnic Here Sunday. (1923, June 18). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, p. 12

7 Injured As Coaster Cars Crash. (1921, August 1). The Daily Times, p. 1.

Anniversary Of Turners To Be Held Sunday. (1920, June 18). The Davenport Democrat And Leader, p. 16.

Broken Brake Show Caused Coaster Crash. (1921, August 4). The Daily Times, p. 18.

Chiro Sanitarium Sues For Cost Of Wrecking Coaster. (1926, October 8). The Daily Times, p. 6.

Eight Hurt, One Badly in Double Accident at Forest ark Figure 8. (1921, August 1). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, p. 11.

Forest Park, 45 Years Amusement Center, to Go Out of Existence. (1923, August 24). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, p. 13.

Forest Park, for Years Davenport’s Playground, OPen Sunday Last Time. (1923, August 24). The Daily Times, p. 2.

Look for the Giant Coaster. (1920, August 16). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, p. 32.

Roller Coaster To Be Equipped With ‘Controls’. (1923, June 19). The Daily Times, p. 6.

Seven Injured in Coaster Accident. (1923, June 18). The Daily Times, pp. 1-2.

Ten Injured in Coaster Crash. (1923, June 18). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, pp. 1-2.

Will Operate Amusements At Forest Park. (1920, May 4). The Davenport Democrat and Leader, p. 12.

 

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Celebrating the Figge Art Museum for Quad Cities Museum Week http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/15/celebrating-the-figge-art-museum-for-quad-cities-museum-week/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/15/celebrating-the-figge-art-museum-for-quad-cities-museum-week/ Fri, 15 Jun 2018 17:12:51 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Happy Quad Cities Museum Week! The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center celebrates the Figge Museum of Art (the Davenport Public Library’s partner in this year’s Read Wild Summer Reading Program) by sharing these examples of its commitment to local artists and art … Continue reading

Happy Quad Cities Museum Week!

The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center celebrates the Figge Museum of Art (the Davenport Public Library’s partner in this year’s Read Wild Summer Reading Program) by sharing these examples of its commitment to local artists and art collectors in the 1940s and ’50s. These exhibition guides and announcements are from our Davenport Municipal Art Gallery/Davenport Museum of Art (predecessors of the Figge) collection, #2004-70.

The First Exhibition of Art and Artist Along the Mississippi took place at at the Davenport Municipal Gallery in April of 1940 and included paintings by twenty Quad City area artists: Norma Anderson, John Bloom, Ed Clark, Dan Enich, Grace French Evans, Evelyn Blunt Ficke, Marjorie W. Godley, Helen Hinrichsen, Irma Rene Koen, Reginald Neal, Paul Norton, Louise Paterson, Ella Preston, Emilie Sass, Mary F. Schroder, Helen Loosly Stone, Ruth Currens Waterman, Frank Weisbrook, and Lou Weisbrook.

The work of some of the individual local artists whose names appear in the above list, such as Reginald Neal and Helen Hinrichsen, were later presented at the Gallery.

 

 

Rock Island resident Neal showed “kodachrome slides of many of the interesting places in which he painted and sketched” on his “trip to Old Mexico” in connection with his one-man show in 1945.  Hinrichsen, a Davenport illustrator and painter, was commissioned to create local public art including the Davenport Centennial Mural and the stairway decorations for the Petersen-Harned-Von Maur store. Her solo exhibition at the Gallery was in November, 1955.

Then as now, the Gallery supported art education in Quad Cities area schools. This is the cover of a program for the Secondary Art Exhibit of the Davenport Community Schools held in May, 1959.

The Quad Cities was also home to several serious art collectors. In the spring of 1942, the Davenport Municipal Art Gallery presented A Loan Exhibition of Oil Paintings from Private Art Collections of the Quad Cities for the public’s enjoyment. Collectors included such recognizable names as E. P. Adler, Mrs. William Butterworth, Mrs. C. A. Ficke, Frank Kohrs, Mr. and Mrs. Edwin B. Lindsay, Dorothy Struck, Dr. and Mrs. Karl Vollmer, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Weisbrook.

Works exhibited ranged from Rembrandt and other Dutch Masters to contemporary artists such as Georges Bracque. 19th-century American artists are also well represented.

Individual local collectors were also honored by the Davenport Municipal Art Gallery. Helen Loosely Stone, a Moline resident and member of  “a small group of persons possessing a high degree of esthetic awareness [who] met regularly to study and enjoy Japanese and Chinese color-prints,” possessed an impressive collection of works in this genre. After her death, her friends and family arranged to have the prints donated to the Gallery. Her collection was exhibited in October, 1956.

For more information on the history of the Figge Art Museum, visit the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center of the Davenport Library. Other archival collections include the records of the Friends of the Davenport Museum of Art (#2004-68), the Davenport Museum of Art Guild (#2004-68), and the Beaux-Arts organization (#2004-71).

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Online Reading Challenge – Mid-Month Check In http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-mid-month-check-in-5/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-mid-month-check-in-5/ Fri, 15 Jun 2018 06:00:50 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hello All! Are you enjoying the June Reading Challenge? Have you found something fun to read? Or are you still looking for the right title? I’ve started reading my book (A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle). I’m still trying to keep all the “mrs’s” straight, but I’m quickly getting[Read more]

Hello All!

Are you enjoying the June Reading Challenge? Have you found something fun to read? Or are you still looking for the right title?

I’ve started reading my book (A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle). I’m still trying to keep all the “mrs’s” straight, but I’m quickly getting caught up in the story. What I’ve found interesting is how other people react when I ask if they’ve read this book. I heard a lot of enthusiastic yeses; everyone seemed to love it. Best response, though, was from a co-worker who told me that A Wrinkle in Time was the book made her a library patron. When the teacher at school that was reading it to her class wasn’t reading fast enough for Shelley, she asked her Mom to take her to the library so that she could check out a copy. Thus began a lifelong love affair with reading (and, I hope, libraries!)

Another great story came from a Challenge reader that commented she is going to read a book written in 1898 that had been a childhood favorite of her mother. I love this idea! It shows how books are a bridge – to the past, to the future, to knowledge, to entertainment and that they can also be a connection to the people in our lives. Books (stories) are magic.

Let us know what you’re reading and, maybe, why you chose what you did!

 

 

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Not That I Could Tell by Jessica Strawser http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/not-that-i-could-tell-by-jessica-strawser/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/not-that-i-could-tell-by-jessica-strawser/ Wed, 13 Jun 2018 06:00:07 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe   Not That I Could Tell by Jessica Strawser is a mysterious read about a group of neighborhood women who are all connected to each other. Yellow Springs is a small Ohio town that is rocked by the sudden and shocking disappearance of young mother Kristin and her twins. The women of[Read more]

  Not That I Could Tell by Jessica Strawser is a mysterious read about a group of neighborhood women who are all connected to each other. Yellow Springs is a small Ohio town that is rocked by the sudden and shocking disappearance of young mother Kristin and her twins.

The women of Yellow Springs are excited to realize that their baby monitors all reach one of the women’s backyard. They gather around a firepit one Saturday night to relax and take a night off from husbands, kids, and life in general. They drink too much and share more than usual. After all, everyone has secrets.

On Monday morning, whispers begin to circulate around town that one of the women is missing. Kristin, the adorable twin mom, who seems to have everything together and under control with her handsome doctor husband, has disappeared into the night without a trace with her two children. As police begin investigating, they dig up secrets surrounding each woman. Instead of finding answers about what happened to Kristin, whether she’s dead or alive, police discover that Kristin doesn’t seem too worried about her impending divorce, even with her husband moved out. Kristin’s husband, Paul, finds himself at the center of the investigation as he moves back into the family home and starts packing up their belongings to move on with his life.

Kristin’s closest neighbor, Clara, is having difficulties with Kristin and her children’s disappearance. Clara’s past is troubled. With the police searching the neighborhood and interviewing the neighbors, this incident is triggering memories of her past that Clara would really like to forget. Soon Clara unwittingly finds herself dragged right into the center of the investigation. When she’s thrust into the spotlight, Clara’s suspicions begin to rise.

Each neighbor is forced to closely examine their own lives behind closed doors as secrets begin to leak out and suspicions about what really happened thrown around. Kristin and the twins’ disappearance becomes a cold case, leaving the neighborhood feeling confused, betrayed, and worried that something sinister could be lurking around their idyllic town of Yellow Springs.

This book was an interesting read as it sheds light on what really is happening behind the scenes and how real life usually always varies from what is presented in the media. While I had issues with some characters, I liked how the author went beyond the surface details and let us see the divide between what we present to the public and what is actually happening behind closed doors.


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The Identicals by Elin Hilderbrand http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-identicals-by-elin-hilderbrand/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-identicals-by-elin-hilderbrand/ Tue, 12 Jun 2018 06:00:25 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Growing up, I always wished that I had an identical twin sister. I blame The Parent Trap movie for that wish. Having someone who looked exactly like me who would be there to trick our friends and family into thinking they were the other person sounded like so much fun. I[Read more]

Growing up, I always wished that I had an identical twin sister. I blame The Parent Trap movie for that wish. Having someone who looked exactly like me who would be there to trick our friends and family into thinking they were the other person sounded like so much fun. I met a set of identical twins in middle school, realized just how confusing that would actually be, abandoned that desire, and stuck with my normal, not identical, siblings. A lot easier that way. I had forgotten about my twin sister desire until I picked up The Identicals by Elin Hilderbrand and got a glimpse into what it is like to have an identical twin as an adult.

The Identicals by Elin Hilderbrand tells the complicated stories of Tabitha and Harper Frost. One twin lives on Nantucket, while the other lives on Martha’s Vineyard: a distance of only two and a half hours away by ferry. Yet that two and a half hour separation is widened by years of disagreements, arguments, and resentment that continuously builds because the two never talk to each other. While the two may look exactly like each other, that doesn’t mean they are alike AT ALL. Their personalities, life decisions, and clothing choices only prove to illustrate this point.

Harper and Tabitha have spent their entire lives trying to separate themselves from the other twin and from their other parent. You see, when Tabitha and Harper were young, their parents divorced and each parent took one of the twins to live with them year round with vacations thrown in so the other twin got to see the parent that they didn’t live with. This awkward situation left the twins with some major resentment towards each other and weird interactions with the other parent.

A major family crisis forces the two women together after many years apart. This forced reconciliation sounds like a recipe for disaster, but add in the twin’s mother and Tabitha’s teenage daughter and things are bound to get interesting. Each twin’s personal life keeps forcibly making itself known to the other twin which results in confusion amongst others as they try to figure out which is which. Tabitha and Harper may not want to have to band together through this family crisis, but they sure know how to appear like they like each other. These false appearances can only last so long though and the twins are soon forced to turn to each other for real.


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Enroll in our Summer Book Arts Academy http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/08/enroll-in-our-summer-book-arts-academy/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/08/enroll-in-our-summer-book-arts-academy/ Fri, 08 Jun 2018 17:03:10 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Summer Book Arts Academy is a hands-on workshop series offering community members an opportunity to learn more about book arts and how to create them. Each workshop will cover a different type of book arts spanning from simple binding techniques … Continue reading

Summer Book Arts Academy is a hands-on workshop series offering community members an opportunity to learn more about book arts and how to create them. Each workshop will cover a different type of book arts spanning from simple binding techniques to lettering arts. Register today for the workshops that take your fancy!             

Dates and Times: 2nd & 4th Wednesdays in June through August

Wednesday, June 13th at 4:30 Pamphlet Book Binding 
Wednesday, June 27th at 4:30 Introduction to Paper Marbling 
Wednesday, July 11th at 4:30 Japanese Stab Binding 
Wednesday, July 25th at 4:30 Accordion Binding 
Wednesday, August 8th at 4:30 Hand Lettering 101 with presenter, Hannah Eddy from Nourished Lettering  
Wednesday, August 22th at 4:30 Relief Printing: Linocut 

Location: 
Davenport Public Library | Main 
321 Main Street 
Davenport, IA 52801 

Click here to register online or call 563-326-7902   

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Ink In Water: An Illustrated Memoir (Or, How I Kicked Anorexia’s Ass and Embraced Body Positivity) http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/ink-in-water-an-illustrated-memoir-or-how-i-kicked-anorexias-ass-and-embraced-body-positivity/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/ink-in-water-an-illustrated-memoir-or-how-i-kicked-anorexias-ass-and-embraced-body-positivity/ Fri, 08 Jun 2018 06:00:26 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe Anyone who has struggled with addiction or compulsion will likely  appreciate Ink In Water and find it inspiring. Davis, described as a “young punk artist” by Library Journal, tells an autobiographical story about incredibly painful life experiences revolving around disordered eating, recovery, loss, and finally–helping others overcome similar disorders. Now[Read more]

Anyone who has struggled with addiction or compulsion will likely  appreciate Ink In Water and find it inspiring. Davis, described as a “young punk artist” by Library Journal, tells an autobiographical story about incredibly painful life experiences revolving around disordered eating, recovery, loss, and finally–helping others overcome similar disorders. Now a personal trainer, coach, author, and “body image advocate”, Davis’s memoir reveals how she first developed an eating disorder and got ensnared in the negative feedback loop that accompanies the psychology of self-harm.

The illustrations depicting Davis at the height (or really, rock-bottom) of her disorder show an emaciated, isolated individual who was starving herself to death. But by the end of the memoir, illustrations show a woman who has learned to cut herself some slack. In contrast, the woman in the final pages of the memoir is strong, determined, and no longer fears taking up space. To the contrary, Davis is interested in building herself up, through the practice of weight-lifting and strength training. Rather than shrinking and trying to make herself smaller, she embarks on a lifelong journey of recovery by focusing her mental and physical energy on becoming stronger.

While this graphic novel is largely about learning to love yourself, it also did a wonderful job of showing what a loving, supportive relationship can look like. I got a little teary when reading about how Davis’s partner essentially doubled-down on being loving and supportive through the hard times (rather than turning away from her when she was at her worst). When Davis experiences a particularly devastating loss of one of her best friends, mentors, and sponsors, her partner plans a trip to New York City to help her get out of her head.  Their relationship beautifully demonstrates how loving partnerships allow for being openly vulnerable and loved and supported in spite of individual faults or shortcomings.

Check it out. I didn’t really even start regularly reading graphic novels until I picked up a work of graphic medicine. As someone who genuinely enjoys non-fiction (I know — crazy!), graphic memoirs have been a really nice change of pace. This book reminds me of how resilient we are, and that we can get better and come back even stronger after being in the grips of something that threatens to destroy us.

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The Escape Artist by Brad Meltzer http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-escape-artist-by-brad-meltzer/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-escape-artist-by-brad-meltzer/ Wed, 06 Jun 2018 06:00:57 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Military suspense thrillers have been popular for years, yet I have seldom read any. I decided to change this by stepping lightly into this genre. The Escape Artist by Brad Meltzer may not be considered a strict military suspense thriller, but there is a definite military feel since the majority[Read more]

Military suspense thrillers have been popular for years, yet I have seldom read any. I decided to change this by stepping lightly into this genre. The Escape Artist by Brad Meltzer may not be considered a strict military suspense thriller, but there is a definite military feel since the majority of this book takes place on or near Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. Add in a compelling story line, missing people, and high levels of secrecy and I was hooked.

The Escape Artist tells the story of Jim ‘Zig’ Zigarowski and his quest to find out what really happened to Nola Brown. Nola Brown was on a flight from Alaska when the plane mysteriously fell from the sky. All on the plane perished and Nola’s body was found not far from the crash site. Mysteries surround this crash as one of the President’s very close friends was on board: the Librarian of Congress. Tasked with finding out what happened, Zig soon finds all of the bodies from the crash delivered to him at the morgue at Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. With identities already confirmed by their supervisors, Zig and his colleagues are expected to perform the autopsies as quick as possible and get the bodies back to the families.

When looking at Nola’s body, Zig discovers that there is no way that the body in front of him could be that of Nola Brown. Nola was a childhood friend of Zig’s daughter. A long time ago, Nola saved Zig’s daughter’s life. As a result of that, Nola has a tell-tale scar that Zig knows to look for on Nola. Discovering that it isn’t there and knowing that there wouldn’t be a cosmetic way to make that disappear, Zig realizes that Nola is still alive. The question of why someone would go through such steps to say that this body is Nola’s nags at Zig. He decides that he has to find Nola, if for no other reason than to pay her back for the time that she saved his daughter’s life.

Nola is supposed to be dead. With some investigating, Zig digs into Nola’s past and tries to learn what in her life caused people to want to kill her. He discovers that Nola is a mystery, her previous supervisors believe that she is a curse and trouble follows her everywhere. Looking into these incidents, it becomes clear why the Army chooses to sequester Nola as their artist-in-residence. This keeps her out of the line of fire and hopefully decreases her tendency to bring trouble to any situation.

Nola’s current job allows her to travel the world to any location and any catastrophe in order to make art and observe. Each artist-in-residence has a theme to their artwork throughout their residency. As Zig looks around, he discovers that Nola’s missions may have triggered the notice of an enemy who will do whatever it takes to silence her. Zig and Nola find themselves thrown together on a journey to discover the truth behind a centuries-old conspiracy that reaches all the way up to the highest levels of government and involves an unlikely partner: Harry Houdini.

Here’s to hoping that Brad Metzler turns this book into a series! I’d love to find out what happens with Zig and Nola next.


This book is also available in the following formats:

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You Do You: How To Be Who You Are and Use What You’ve Got To Get What You Want by Sarah Knight http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/you-do-you-how-to-be-who-you-are-and-use-what-youve-got-to-get-what-you-want-by-sarah-knight/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/you-do-you-how-to-be-who-you-are-and-use-what-youve-got-to-get-what-you-want-by-sarah-knight/ Tue, 05 Jun 2018 06:00:43 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe I recall George Carlin’s sardonic humor and his insight that the concept of self-help books are oxymoronic because you didn’t write them yourself. That simple yet profound insight has stuck with me for years. And I guess that’s why You Do You: How To Be Who You Are and Use What You’ve Got[Read more]

I recall George Carlin’s sardonic humor and his insight that the concept of self-help books are oxymoronic because you didn’t write them yourself. That simple yet profound insight has stuck with me for years. And I guess that’s why You Do You: How To Be Who You Are and Use What You’ve Got To Get What You Want (A No F*cks Given Guide) is one of the best self-help books I’ve read (and I’ve read more than I’ll ever admit, people).

This book is good for many reasons, but most importantly the book revolves around the concept that you should “write your own” self-help book, which is to say that you should honor yourself enough to fashion your life around your individual wants and needs – not put them on the backburner in order to comply with some pre-imposed idea of how you’re supposed to be. Novel concept, eh? And OF COURSE there is a caveat. It’s almost sad that Knight would need to write the disclaimer that “you doing you” does not translate into “sure, go ahead and be a self-serving sociopath.”  In fact, there are even a couple of places where you can physically write in this book, so the late, great Mr. Carlin might be pleased. Might.

But seriously though. So many self-help books offer prescriptions for acquiring success, wealth, and general life satisfaction; but this book places YOU at the center and starts there by helping you to reframe your “weaknesses” to view them as strengths. (In a way, the book then also reinforces the idea that there are no shortcuts and that YOU yourself are the key to unlocking your own door, so to speak). One of my favorite parts of the book is how Knight interrogates numerous social norms that leave us feeling like L7 weenies should we deviate (oh, and that pressure to confirm, comply, and fall in line is powerful, friends).  If anyone got my L7 Weenie reference, I’m super-impressed, by the way, and we’d probably be best friends or would at least be able to swap movie recommendations.  Knight explains that we should not blindly accept widely-held beliefs just because they’ve become tradition (i.e. family comes first, don’t be so selfish, etc) and that, instead, we should draw on and celebrate ourselves in order to live more fulfilling, authentic lives. I can’t say I disagree, people. But that’s apparently much easier said then done. And while that insight is not particularly new or profound, it actually KIND OF IS because she’s willing to stand up as an anti-guru on an anti-pulpit and put herself in the line of fire so you might grow a pair (of ovaries, duh) and feel inspired.

Of course if you read reviews, people will say everything from “it’s so funny and brilliant and helpful” to “it’s vapid and there were too many plugs for her other books.” Well, loddy freakin’ dah, folks. You can’t please ’em all, can you? The other criticism was that she is too liberal with her usage of expletives and irreverence which I view as one of the absolutely best and most relatable components of the book. Also, since this is book is the third in a series, I guess it’s the “weakest link” according to some (which only means I’m even more excited to read her other two books “The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving A F*ck and Get Your Sh*t Together.)

This book was basically the equivalent of having my own personal, hilarious cheerleader on the sidelines of my own personal lifetime movie,  trying to help me live my life authentically, unapologetically. As I read on a plane en route to Atlanta, I  chuckled and even cackled aloud, and I didn’t even care if I looked stupid in the process. As someone who has had my own struggles with self-consciousness and self-doubt, this book was incredibly inspiring and validating.

And sometimes you just need someone in your corner, even if it’s a potty-mouthed book lady-after-your-own-heart, reminding you that YOU’RE SCREWING YOU IF YOU’RE NOT DOING YOU, and you’re doing so is a disservice to humanity.

 

 

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Investigate the Past: Annie Wittenmyer Complex Program http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/01/investigate-the-past-annie-wittenmyer-complex-program/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/06/01/investigate-the-past-annie-wittenmyer-complex-program/ Fri, 01 Jun 2018 14:00:10 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Have you ever been curious about the Annie Wittenmyer Complex (the former Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home) on Eastern Avenue in Davenport? This coming Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at 4:30 p.m., the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center of the Daveport Public Library … Continue reading

Have you ever been curious about the Annie Wittenmyer Complex (the former Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home) on Eastern Avenue in Davenport?

This coming Tuesday, June 5, 2018, at 4:30 p.m., the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center of the Daveport Public Library will present the program “Investigate the Past: the Annie Wittenmyer Complex” at our Main Street location.

Join us as we examine memoirs, newspaper articles, photographs, architectural drawings, and other sources that tell the story of this fascinating local institution.

Over the years, our blog has covered different aspects of the historic Annie Wittenmyer Complex, including these posts:

What’s in a Name? The Annie Wittenmyer Home – November 15, 2012

A New (Old) Look at the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home – January 9, 2014

The Mystery of the Orphans’ Monument – May 22, 2014

Build A Better Davenport: The Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home 1865–1975 – June 23, 2017

40 Years Ago: The Annie Wittenmyer Branch of the Davenport Public Library – April 13, 2018

…but this event will be a rare opportunity to learn the overall history of the property from before it became the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home to after the Annie Wittenmyer facility’s closing in 1974.

This early image of the Complex is among the many interesting items featured in our program:

View at the Orphans’ Home, Davenport, Iowa. Evans’ Western View Collection – Image 135. c. late 1860s

We look forward to sharing them all with you on Tuesday afternoon!

(posted by Amy D.)

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A Memorial Day Remembrance: Private Arthur C. Franz http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/25/a-memorial-day-remembrance-private-arthur-c-franz/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/25/a-memorial-day-remembrance-private-arthur-c-franz/ Fri, 25 May 2018 14:35:50 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Memorial Day 1918 was a somber day in Davenport. Not only were local citizens remembering those fallen in wars past, they were also mourning the first soldier from Davenport to be lost (only weeks earlier, in France) in the current … Continue reading

Memorial Day 1918 was a somber day in Davenport. Not only were local citizens remembering those fallen in wars past, they were also mourning the first soldier from Davenport to be lost (only weeks earlier, in France) in the current conflict.

It was not even known on that Memorial Day where the body of Private Arthur C. Franz was laid to rest, nor where in France he died in battle.

The telegram bearing the sad news was received by Private Franz’s brother-in-law, Mr. Arthur H. Beck, at his place of employment. It simply stated “Deeply regret to inform you that Private Arthur C. Franz, Infantry, is officially reported as killed in action April 20, 1918.” It was sent by Adjutant General McCain, United States Army, in Washington.

The Daily Times, May 2, 1918, 1.

On May 13, 1918, Private Franz’s sister, Mrs. Myrtle Beck, received a letter from Adjutant General Austin A. Parker stating that no details about Private Franz’s death were yet known. He explained that due to emergency conditions, all fallen soldiers were being buried in Europe but that after the war, their remains would be returned to the soldiers’ families at the public’s expense. The letter concluded with directions on the proper departments to contact relating to a soldier’s personal effects, insurance issues, and salary owed.

Private Franz was just a few months short of his 30th birthday.

Arthur Charles Franz was born June 3, 1888 in Muscatine, Iowa to German immigrant Charles Franz and Iowa-born Frances Neff. His only sibling was his older sister Myrtle.

Charles Franz worked in the hotel industry and moved to Davenport when Arthur was very young. Arthur’s mother died June 1901 in Davenport from typhoid fever.

Siblings Arthur and Myrtle both attended Davenport schools. Local newspapers made mention of Arthur playing baseball on a local team in May of 1902 and graduating ninth grade from Davenport School No. 8 in June 1903. Although he also attended Davenport High School, his name is not listed on any of the school’s graduation lists.

Arthur eventually followed his father into the hotel business. He moved from Davenport shortly before the war for a job in Connecticut. Franz enlisted in the United States Army in June 1917 with the 102nd U.S. Infantry and had been overseas in France since September of that year.

The Scott County Council of Defense memorialized Private Franz and Miss Marion Crandell, who died March 20, 1918 in France while working for the Red Cross, on May 7th during a program held at the Turner Grand Opera House.

By chance, just hours after she received the telegram informing her of her brother’s death, Myrtle Beck received a letter from Arthur dated April 12, 1918. It was printed in the local newspapers along with the announcement of his death. It described the body lice and rats found in the trenches and the never-ending rain in France. Just before signing off from his letter, Arthur recommended his sister read [Arthur Guy] Empey’s book Over the Top to learn more about the life of a soldier in the war.

Private Arthur C. Franz is buried at Saint Mihiel American Cemetery and Memorial in Thiaucourt, France. 

The Davenport Democrat and Leader, November 11, 1918, 1.

Sources:

The Daily Times, May 2, 1918, 1.

The Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 2, 1918, 1.

The Daily Times, May 14, 1918, 7.

The Davenport Democrat and Leader, June 18, 1901, 4.

The Daily Times, May 20, 1902, 4.

The Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 3, 1918, 3.

The Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 7, 1918, 13.

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Fun-Size Fire Insurance Maps of Davenport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/19/fun-size-fire-insurance-maps-of-davenport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/19/fun-size-fire-insurance-maps-of-davenport/ Sat, 19 May 2018 11:13:00 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In anticipation of this coming Tuesday’s program, “Genealogical Perspectives on Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps” (6:30pm on 5/22 at our 321 Main Street location) we are featuring a recent addition to our collection of these sources that consistently prove valuable to … Continue reading

In anticipation of this coming Tuesday’s program, “Genealogical Perspectives on Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps” (6:30pm on 5/22 at our 321 Main Street location) we are featuring a recent addition to our collection of these sources that consistently prove valuable to our understanding of the development of Davenport’s built environment over time. 

In the 1950s the Sanborn Map Company began to republish earlier editions of its large-scale fire insurance maps (sheets measuring 22″ x 28″) for many U.S cities and towns, touting the new “Reduced Size Sanborn Map” (at 11″ x 13″) as able “to effect an appreciable saving in floor space and to permit more economical utilization…” The map, “[s]tripped of bulkiness and excessive weight” could now be “easily carried from a map cabinet to a conventional desk.” “Female employees can handle this compact product with ease,” the new foreward proclaimed:

The 1910 edition (revised to 1950) of the Insurance Maps of Davenport Iowa was republished by the company in this “fun-size” format in 1956. Sheets were assembled in three “Bar-Loc” brand binders, comprising volumes 1A, 1, and 2.

Cover

Key Map

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center was fortunate enough to acquire this well-kept set from a downtown Davenport insurance company in recent years. Revisions and corrections date to September 1978, making it possible to track changes to the city’s appearance over the three decades after the 1940’s updates to our copy of the 1910 edition.

We were especially delighted to see that our 1968 Edward Durrell Stone-designed Davenport Public Library building is documented in this set of maps! The outline of the original Carnegie building is still visible underneath the paste-down.

The handy Description and Utilization of the Sanborn Map was issued along with the three-volume set. These instructions, complete with the charming fictional city of Sanbornville, NY as an exemplar, offer insight into how the the maps were used not only by fire insurance companies, but also banks, mortgage companies, utility companies, and various government agencies.

A slip of paper from the Sanborn Map Company inserted among the pages of this booklet reads “…it is understood that your copy of the superseded conventional map…will be physically destroyed following transfer of your data to this replacement reduced size map.” Being in the business of helping people research the history of their homes and their ancestors’ residences and businesses in years prior to 1956, we are grateful that the original owner of our 1910 edition of the Insurance Maps of Davenport Iowa did not heed this command!

In addition to the “conventional” and “reduced size” 1910 Sanborn maps of Davenport, the Center’s collection includes print and microfiche copies of the 1886 maps, and both a microfiche and an original bound copy of the 1892 set.  As of a year ago this month, the Library of Congress began publishing digitial copies of the Sanborn fire insurance maps in its collection online, so we can now direct researchers to the 1886 and 1892 editions of the Davenport maps in color. An 1895 map of LeClaire and a 1913 map of Dixon in Scott County are available on the site, as well as maps for many other Iowa cities and towns.

Join us this Tuesday night for Lisa Louise Cook’s advice on conducting genealogical research using Sanborn fire insurance maps, or visit the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center anytime to view the Davenport maps in our collection!

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Lost but Not Forgotten: A Brief History of the H. H. Andresen Residence, 726 West 6th Street http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/14/a-brief-history-of-the-h-h-andresen-residence-726-west-6th-street/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/14/a-brief-history-of-the-h-h-andresen-residence-726-west-6th-street/ Mon, 14 May 2018 19:16:42 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Although a suspicious fire destroyed the historic home at 726 West 6th Street in Davenport’s Gold Coast neighborhood last Thursday morning, it will not be lost to memory: sources available here at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center preserve the story … Continue reading

Although a suspicious fire destroyed the historic home at 726 West 6th Street in Davenport’s Gold Coast neighborhood last Thursday morning, it will not be lost to memory: sources available here at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center preserve the story of the Hamburg Historic District property known as the “H. H. Andresen Residence.”

Perhaps the earliest image of the home is that published in the Huebinger brothers’ 1887 viewbook, Das Erste Album der Stadt Davenport, Iowa (=The first album of the city of Davenport, Iowa, SC 917.7769 HUE):

Thanks to the notice of P. C. Harding’s sale of the property to Andresen in the Davenport Daily Gazette of March 3, 1880, we know the site was “covered with choice fruit trees and shrubs” atop the bluff with “as fine a view of the river as there is to be found in this city.” Andressen was “congratulated in securing such a desirable home” in a “pleasant neighborhood” with “convenience to business” in the city; a “bargain” at $6,000 cash.

Andresen built his house on the property six years after the purchase, possibly enlarging a smaller brick structure dating to 1865-1870.  The Davenport Democrat for June 18, 1886 reported that construction was underway and that the owner would be moving in that fall.

Built in the Richarsonian Romanesque style, the three-story structure’s distinguishing features included a Flemish step gable and decorative terra cotta and brick work. [1] According to a 1921 report of the house’s sale, “[t]he entire finishings of the building are imported from Germany, many of the old window lights bearing German inscriptions.” [2]  Perhaps because of the impressive corner tower (shown in plan on the 1892 Sanborn Fire Insurance map for Davenport, below [3]) the residence was often referred to in later years as a “castle.”

The grandeur of the home reflected the success of the man. A biographical sketch under the heading “City Builders” appeared in the Davenport Democrat on June 18, 1886 as construction of the home was underway. 

Davenport Illustrated: Saengerfest Souvenir, July 1898. Davenport, Iowa: Saengerbund of the Northwest, 1898.

From the sketch we learn that Andresen and his wife, Marie E. Thomsen, had come to Davenport in 1855 to join the established community of German refugees from the Schleswig-Holstein controversy. He had first fled to the United States in 1851, working in Milwaukee as a school teacher and later in Chicago in land sales.

Upon arriving in Davenport, Andresen opened a general store on the northwest corner of 3rd Street and Western Avenue. He quickly became active in civic life: by 1859 he was elected Second Ward Alderman and the following year he became deputy sheriff under James Thorington. During the Civil War he served as manager of the post at Fort Scott, Kansas, from 1862 through 1864.

After the war, Andresen returned to public service in Davenport. He was again Second Ward Alderman and Chair of the Finance Committee for the city from 1864 until 1868.

In 1865 he started window blind manufacturing company and began investing in other local business concerns, including the Davenport Glucose Works. He was named secretary of the Davenport Fire Insurance Company, the predecessor to the German Savings Bank. Through his management, this institution had become, by 1886, “one of the greatest financial institutions in Iowa– one of the greatest in the entire country in its brand of banking.” He would later become the Bank’s president in 1892.

Almost as soon as it was complete, Andresen’s “handsome new residence on Sixth Street” suffered its first misfortune. On August 15th, 1886, the home was struck by lightning, the following day’s Democrat noting that “[t]he heavenly artillery was aimed at the circular tower and scalped off a patch of slating about four by ten feet.”

A “slight blaze,” at the rear of the Andresen residence, “caused by the explosion of some chemicals in the basement” was reported in the Davenport Morning Star on October 5, 1890.

A third and most tragic accident occurred at the Andresen home in September of 1905.  Fifteen-year-old Herbert Penner, residing at the time with his aunt, uncle, and great-uncle Andresen, turned on a gas water heater as he prepared to take a bath. A ventilator had not yet been installed and the boy, unaware of the need to open the bathroom window, was asphyxiated by gas fumes. [3]

Hans Heinrich Andresen passed away the following year, on May 11, 1906. His daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Klenze, inherited the house on 726 West 6th Street. It stood vacant in the years that followed the couple’s trade of the property for a Silvis, Illinois farm in 1909; by 1912 we find advertisements for a rooming house called “Fredrich’s Retreat” at that address.

The Daily Times, Nov. 4, 1912, 13.

In 1921 the property was sold to Henry Harbeck, president and business agent of the Tri-City Musicians’ Union and former manager of Davenport Turner Hall.  The “Harbeck Apartments” were advertised in the local newspapers through the early 1920s. In 1927, the property became a subject of dispute in his divorce from his wife, Minnie. [4] According to Davenport city directories, the building was known as the “Edwards Apartments” from the 1930s through the late 1980s.

The tragic loss of the H. H. Andresen Residence only strengthens our resolve to bring the stories of other historic Davenport properties to light. Watch this blog or visit the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center at the Davenport Public Library’s Main Street location to discover more about local families and the places they called home.

——————————————————————————————————

[1] Architectural/Historical Survey conducted by Wehner, Nowysz, Pattschull and Pfiffner for the Davenport Community Development Department and the Iowa Division of Historic Preservation, [1983?].

[2] Sanborn Fire Insurance Map from Davenport, Scott County, Iowa. Sanborn Map Company, 1892. Map. Retrieved from the Library of Congress,  https://www.loc.gov/item/sanborn02624_002/

[3] Davenport Democrat and Leader, Sept. 7, 1905.

[4] Davenport Democrat and Leader, Apr. 3, 1927.

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Sources for the Study of Davenporters’ Experiences in WWI http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/04/sources-for-the-study-of-davenporters-experiences-in-wwi/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/05/04/sources-for-the-study-of-davenporters-experiences-in-wwi/ Fri, 04 May 2018 16:48:53 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections A century ago, in the spring of 1918, the first soldiers from Davenport to see foreign service in the conflict that would later become known as the First World War arrived safely in France. The Davenport Democrat and Leader and the Daily Times published … Continue reading

A century ago, in the spring of 1918, the first soldiers from Davenport to see foreign service in the conflict that would later become known as the First World War arrived safely in France. The Davenport Democrat and Leader and the Daily Times published these headlines in on April 22nd of that year:

The area newspapers, available here at the Center on microfilm, can offer a firsthand, detailed understanding of many of the men’s experiences during the war. Curtis and Hollis Bush, two brothers named among those sent to France, wrote home to Davenport throughout the summer and fall of 1918; their parents, Attorney and Mrs. A. G. Bush, allowed the Daily Times to print lengthy extracts from the letters.

 

Through their families’ reports to the local newspapers, we may also learn the fate of other Davenport soldiers in this first group sent overseas: Frank Griffin suffered severe wounds when his plane was shot down; both LeRoy Willey and Walter D. Evans were gassed in the fighting; and Englebert Davenport married almost immediately upon his return from France.

Another source in our collection, Soldiers of the Great War, (SC 940.4 Sol) memorializes those Iowa men who did not survive the struggle. Pages of portrait photographs accompany listings of names of the dead by state.

Among the other Davenporters who gave their lives, we find in this volume Corporal William F. Bredfeldt and James Lindsay (died of wounds), Captain John D. Swiney (died of disease), and Edward Haut (killed in action). Their stories, such as that of  Greek immigrant Emmanuel Lucas, also killed in action, can be fleshed out by turning once again to the local newspapers.

Daily Times, Nov. 20, 1918

 

Davenport Democrat and Leader, Jan. 27, 1918

Lucas’ father, “his only relative in this country, “confidently” expected “to hear from his son before many days” once he learned he had gone missing on October 7, 1918. How devastating it must have been for him to later discover that was in fact the date of his son’s death!

Perhaps the most complete documentation on the Davenport men who served in the war is the collection of World War I Selective Service System draft registration cards, 1917-1918 for Iowa and Illinois (Rock Island County) that we have introduced previously.  It is available on microfilm at the Center (SC MICROFILM 977.7 Wor,) or through the library’s subscriptions to the Ancestry Library (in-house access) and Fold3 databases. Below is Emmanuel Lucas’ draft registration card:

For a wider perspective on the experiences of Davenport and Scott County residents during wartime, including the activities on the homefront, we are fortunate that the Scott County Council of National Defense was moved to assemble its History of the War Activities of Scott County Iowa 1917-1918  (SC 940.3 Sco).

 

The devoted efforts of local organizations such as the Davenport Woman’s Club, the Lend-A-Hand Club, Friendly House, the YMCA, the Greater Davenport Committee and Commercial Club, and naturally, the public library, are well-documented here.

Local Davenport author Alice French (writing under her pseudonym Octave Thanet) dramatized the struggle that many mothers of soldiers surely experienced in And the Captain Answered (SC FIC Tha).

In these pages, a mother expresses her wish to keep her son out of the war and alive while her acquaintance argues that he must be granted the opportunity to serve his country.

For more on the “Great War,” join us for the World War I lecture series at the Eastern Avenue Branch of the Davenport Public Library.

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In Memoriam: Barbara Bush http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/21/in-memoriam-barbara-bush/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/21/in-memoriam-barbara-bush/ Sat, 21 Apr 2018 12:05:24 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections With these images from the Davenport Public Library’s archives, we are remembering Barbara Bush’s visit for the dedication of the Learning Center on January 21st, 1988. The Learning Center housed a collection of materials specially-selected to help promote literacy, a cause dear … Continue reading

With these images from the Davenport Public Library’s archives, we are remembering Barbara Bush’s visit for the dedication of the Learning Center on January 21st, 1988.

The Learning Center housed a collection of materials specially-selected to help promote literacy, a cause dear to the wife of then-Vice President and Republican presidential candidate George Bush. It was funded with grants from both the Iowa Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Education.

Mrs. Bush delivered a speech in support of literacy efforts nationwide and attended a reception that raised $1,500 for the new Learning Center at the library.

 

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40 Years Ago: The Annie Wittenmyer Branch of the Davenport Public Library http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/13/40-years-ago-the-annie-wittenmyer-branch-of-the-davenport-public-library/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/13/40-years-ago-the-annie-wittenmyer-branch-of-the-davenport-public-library/ Fri, 13 Apr 2018 11:17:45 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections The former administration building of the Annie Wittenmyer Home, at 2800 Eastern Avenue, opened as a branch of the Davenport Public Library on Monday, April 3rd, 1978. That’s forty years ago this month! The City of Davenport’s improvements to the … Continue reading

The former administration building of the Annie Wittenmyer Home, at 2800 Eastern Avenue, opened as a branch of the Davenport Public Library on Monday, April 3rd, 1978. That’s forty years ago this month!

The City of Davenport’s improvements to the building included a new roof, a lowered ceiling, fluorescent lighting, new electrical wiring and outlets, paneled walls, carpeting, and two restrooms. A large parking lot completed the site’s preparation.

The 4,200 square-foot facility offered 15,000 books for both adults and children, as well as audio cassettes, LP’s, and puzzles.

These images are from the Davenport Public Library’s own archives, kept by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center at our Main Street location:

Families enjoyed the new facilities at an open house on Sunday, April 2nd, 1978 from 2 to 4 pm.

The branch was open 43 hours per week: Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 10:00 am to 6:00pm, Tuesday and Friday from 1:00pm to 8:00pm, and Saturday from 10:00am to 3:00pm. 

When the library’s bookmobile service began in 1958, it replaced the “deposit collections” kept in 6 of the Davenport’s public schools. Therefore, when the Wittenmyer facility opened, it was the first new branch to be established in over twenty years.

Over the years, the Annie Wittenmyer branch hosted bedtime story hours, films, young writers’ contests, a homework center, and fun summer activities outside on its beautiful grounds. Here are a few more photos from the DPL archives:

Boys and girls met some unusual creatures…thanks to Chuck Wester, AEA naturalist and Nancy Pope from the Niabi Zoological Society, July 23rd, 1985.

Participants of the 1984 Summer Reading Club on the Annie Wittenmyer grounds.

Budget cuts in 1987 drastically cut hours at the Wittenmyer branch, but in September 1988, it was revamped as the “Family Reading Center” with an expanded collection in a “comfortable, homelike atmosphere.” We even had our own library cat, Dewey!

Branch Library staff: Ann Hetzler, Ted Frahm, Lynn Seline, Mike Weir, Cindy Jones, and Dewey the Library Cat on his birthday, ca. 1988.

The Annie Wittenmyer Branch closed its doors on November 23rd, 2005. Staff and patrons said goodbye at an open house where they enjoyed light refreshments, signed a scrapbook, and shared memories of their neighborhood branch. To the new 24,000 square-foot Fairmount Street Branch (opened in January 2006) went the 45,000 books, CDs and DVDs.

(posted by Cristina)

——————————

Sources:

“A Library Branches Out,” Quad-City Times, March 28, 1978.
“Library opens center,” Quad-City Times, September 26, 1988, 4.
“Saying good-bye to Wittenmyer branch,” Quad-City Times, November 15, 2005. 
Main Entries 5, no. 5 (September/October 1988)

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

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This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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