Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2018 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Flat Broke with Two Goats by Jennifer McGaha http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/flat-broke-with-two-goats-by-jennifer-mcgaha/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/flat-broke-with-two-goats-by-jennifer-mcgaha/ Thu, 19 Apr 2018 06:00:01 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Guest post by Laura This book title, Flat Broke with Two Goats, is one of the catchiest I’ve seen in a while. In this memoir, MaGaha finds herself in foreclosure due to self-admitted willful ignorance of the family finances, which her accountant husband oversaw. My favorite part of the book[Read more]

Guest post by Laura

This book title, Flat Broke with Two Goats, is one of the catchiest I’ve seen in a while. In this memoir, MaGaha finds herself in foreclosure due to self-admitted willful ignorance of the family finances, which her accountant husband oversaw. My favorite part of the book was the author’s move to Macomb, Illinois to teach at “the University”. I had visited a college friend at Western Illinois University in Macomb decades ago, and more recently spent the day there attending a business meeting for a different job so I was a bit familiar with the place. This section of the book was a bit like a mild version of Eat Pray Love, only with cornfields, a boxcar, and sweltering Midwest heat.

At times I found the author annoying in her unwillingness to take responsibility for her actions and for not thoroughly researching the care and feeding of her animals. I also would have found the cabin less disappointing and more potentially exciting. All of those acres of natural timber and a beautiful waterfall view? Sign me up! Sure, the house was a dump and there were poisonous snakes and wolf spiders, but the couple made the house hospitable with some improvements. As for the critters, I admit I would be treading carefully and somewhat anxiously because of the snakes, but I already deal with wolf spiders in my neck of the woods.

The couple went on to raise chickens and goats and slowly transformed from people who lived beyond their means into rural farm people living a simpler life. I liked how she found making yogurt and soap fulfilling. She realized she’s gone back to some of the practices of her ancestors on these same lands, minus the constant backbreaking work and potential to go hungry with a crop failure. I give MaGaha props for bravery in being brutally honest about her life, which must have been difficult. She’s an accomplished freelancer but in looking at her website it appears this was her first published book. I think she will continue to find maturity in her novel-writing voice with subsequent books.

audio version available through Overdrive

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The Big Sick on DVD http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-big-sick-on-dvd/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-big-sick-on-dvd/ Mon, 16 Apr 2018 08:00:43 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Guest blog by Laura The Big Sick is based on the true story of the early relationship between comedian Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon. Nanjiani and Gordon fall in love, which is a problem because Nanjiani’s religion dictates that he must marry a woman of his faith in an[Read more]

Guest blog by Laura

The Big Sick is based on the true story of the early relationship between comedian Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon. Nanjiani and Gordon fall in love, which is a problem because Nanjiani’s religion dictates that he must marry a woman of his faith in an arranged marriage. Gordon becomes seriously ill and falls into a coma shortly after they break up and Nanjiani and her parents are thrust into a tenuous exchange while they watch Gordon’s condition deteriorate.

I’ve had Muslim friends for decades so I am familiar with traditional customs and the cultural schisms that arise on occasion among Muslim children raised in American culture. This movie accurately captured the essence of such a divide.

Nanjiani portrays himself and actress Zoe Kazan portrays Gordon. They have a great onscreen rapport and quickly develop into amiable characters. Zenobia Shroff and Anupam Kher play the role of Nanjiani’s parents. Shroff humorously captures the zeal of an overeager Pakastani/Muslim mother who is persistent in her efforts to play matchmaker. Shroff and Kher deliver one of my favorite scenes in the movie when Nanjiani is leaving for New York.

Holly Hunter and Ray Romano play Gordon’s parents. Hunter is natural in her role of a woman who displays both her ferocity and tenderness as a mother. Romano’s understated, dry humor plays off of Nanjian’s quick and sarcastic wit.

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40 Years Ago: The Annie Wittenmyer Branch of the Davenport Public Library http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/13/40-years-ago-the-annie-wittenmyer-branch-of-the-davenport-public-library/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/04/13/40-years-ago-the-annie-wittenmyer-branch-of-the-davenport-public-library/ Fri, 13 Apr 2018 11:17:45 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections The former administration building of the Annie Wittenmyer Home, at 2800 Eastern Avenue, opened as a branch of the Davenport Public Library on Monday, April 3rd, 1978. That’s forty years ago this month! The City of Davenport’s improvements to the … Continue reading

The former administration building of the Annie Wittenmyer Home, at 2800 Eastern Avenue, opened as a branch of the Davenport Public Library on Monday, April 3rd, 1978. That’s forty years ago this month!

The City of Davenport’s improvements to the building included a new roof, a lowered ceiling, fluorescent lighting, new electrical wiring and outlets, paneled walls, carpeting, and two restrooms. A large parking lot completed the site’s preparation.

The 4,200 square-foot facility offered 15,000 books for both adults and children, as well as audio cassettes, LP’s, and puzzles.

These images are from the Davenport Public Library’s own archives, kept by the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center at our Main Street location:

Families enjoyed the new facilities at an open house on Sunday, April 2nd, 1978 from 2 to 4 pm.

The branch was open 43 hours per week: Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 10:00 am to 6:00pm, Tuesday and Friday from 1:00pm to 8:00pm, and Saturday from 10:00am to 3:00pm. 

When the library’s bookmobile service began in 1958, it replaced the “deposit collections” kept in 6 of the Davenport’s public schools. Therefore, when the Wittenmyer facility opened, it was the first new branch to be established in over twenty years.

Over the years, the Annie Wittenmyer branch hosted bedtime story hours, films, young writers’ contests, a homework center, and fun summer activities outside on its beautiful grounds. Here are a few more photos from the DPL archives:

Boys and girls met some unusual creatures…thanks to Chuck Wester, AEA naturalist and Nancy Pope from the Niabi Zoological Society, July 23rd, 1985.

Participants of the 1984 Summer Reading Club on the Annie Wittenmyer grounds.

Budget cuts in 1987 drastically cut hours at the Wittenmyer branch, but in September 1988, it was revamped as the “Family Reading Center” with an expanded collection in a “comfortable, homelike atmosphere.” We even had our own library cat, Dewey!

Branch Library staff: Ann Hetzler, Ted Frahm, Lynn Seline, Mike Weir, Cindy Jones, and Dewey the Library Cat on his birthday, ca. 1988.

The Annie Wittenmyer Branch closed its doors on November 23rd, 2005. Staff and patrons said goodbye at an open house where they enjoyed light refreshments, signed a scrapbook, and shared memories of their neighborhood branch. To the new 24,000 square-foot Fairmount Street Branch (opened in January 2006) went the 45,000 books, CDs and DVDs.

(posted by Cristina)

——————————

Sources:

“A Library Branches Out,” Quad-City Times, March 28, 1978.
“Library opens center,” Quad-City Times, September 26, 1988, 4.
“Saying good-bye to Wittenmyer branch,” Quad-City Times, November 15, 2005. 
Main Entries 5, no. 5 (September/October 1988)

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Online Reading Challenge – Mid-Month Check In http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-mid-month-check-in-4/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-mid-month-check-in-4/ Fri, 13 Apr 2018 06:00:02 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hello All! How is your month of 1800s era reading going? Have you found anything particularly wonderful? Please share what you’re reading! I, sadly, am not faring too well. I’ve tried a couple Victorian-times mysteries and could not get caught up in either one. Admittedly, I usually don’t read mysteries,[Read more]

Hello All!

How is your month of 1800s era reading going? Have you found anything particularly wonderful? Please share what you’re reading!

I, sadly, am not faring too well. I’ve tried a couple Victorian-times mysteries and could not get caught up in either one. Admittedly, I usually don’t read mysteries, so it’s not a big surprise that they didn’t work for me. I’m still searching, but I may decide to simply indulge myself a bit and re-watch some favorite Jane Austen movie adaptations. It sounds lovely (to me!).

If you’re still looking, here are a couple more suggestions for the 1800s.

A new book, The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister’s Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine by Fitzharris Lindsey should be creepily fascinating. Medicine was still pretty primitive in the 1800s. It’s thanks to the efforts of John Lister that many, many more people didn’t die and that medicine advanced to much safer measures. Lister introduced anesthesia for use during surgery, pasteurization and a greater understanding of bacteria and infection. A fascinating, gory look at the history of medicine!

If you are having trouble untangling the manners and customs of Austen and Dickens and the Victorians of England, be sure to pick up a copy of What Jane Austen Ate and Charles Dickens Knew by Danial Pool. This book is great fun, easy to dip in and out of or read cover to cover. All kinds of subjects are covered including society, fashion and the home. There’s also a handy glossary at the back to explain the more obscure (to us) terms like quadrille (a card game) or camel leopard (a giraffe). This book really helped me to understand primogeniture, a law which prevented the Bennet and Dashwood sisters from inheriting from their father. It also helped explain the restrictions and limitations put on women.

And now over to you – what are you reading this month?

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A Ghost Story on DVD http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-ghost-story-on-dvd/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-ghost-story-on-dvd/ Thu, 12 Apr 2018 06:00:54 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Guest post by Laura Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara play the main characters in this movie that is unlike any other I’ve seen. The music, lighting, and nonverbal actions are almost characters in and of themselves because of the scarcity of dialog. In stark contrast to the last several years[Read more]

Guest post by Laura

Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara play the main characters in this movie that is unlike any other I’ve seen. The music, lighting, and nonverbal actions are almost characters in and of themselves because of the scarcity of dialog. In stark contrast to the last several years of blockbuster films I’ve seen, (I live with action and adventure fans), this was so slow and subtle I can imagine many viewers, such as the one who sat next to me on the couch, and critics alike panning it.

It’s difficult to discuss A Ghost Story without spoilers so I’ll tread carefully in this paragraph but don’t read the last paragraph if you don’t want the ending to be spoiled. What begins quietly and ordinarily voyages into questions of the afterlife, the concept of time, and the human desire to leave a vestige of existence in order to not be forgotten. Affleck, as the main character would seem at first to have an easy job as the actor wearing the sheet, but as I watched, I thought it would likely be very difficult to convey emotion without the usual facial or hand gestures. He did well, showing surprise, sadness, and anger.

The final scene leaves us not knowing something I had assumed we would eventually learn. Open-ended conclusions frustrate many viewers and a Google search about this scene finds many viewers seeking the answer. I have my own thoughts about what happened but like this enigmatic movie, I’m not telling.

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The Drunken Botanist and Wicked Plants by Amy Stewart http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-drunken-botanist-and-wicked-plants-by-amy-stewart/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-drunken-botanist-and-wicked-plants-by-amy-stewart/ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 06:00:21 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Guest post by Laura Gardening and mixology are two hobbies in my household. I’m the gardener and my significant other is the bar-builder and cocktail-crafter. We both dislike drinks with inferior and artificial ingredients. This book seemed to be perfect for the two of us. In The Drunken Botanist, Amy[Read more]

Guest post by Laura

Gardening and mixology are two hobbies in my household. I’m the gardener and my significant other is the bar-builder and cocktail-crafter. We both dislike drinks with inferior and artificial ingredients. This book seemed to be perfect for the two of us. In The Drunken Botanist, Amy Stewart provides historical and geeky botanical details about the plants around the world used to create drinks. She includes a multitude of cocktail, syrups, infusions, and garnish recipes as well. At home, we sometimes bring our personal copy of this book out to entertain our guests with trivia about some of the ingredients in the libations my S.O. creates and serves.

On a different botanical journey, Stewart tackles poisonous and intoxicating plants in Wicked Plants: The Weed That Killed Lincoln’s Mother & Other Botanical Atrocities. Over the years I have found lily of the valley, pokeweed, and snakeroot (see page 213 about Lincoln’s mother) in my backyard. They’re all poisonous when ingested and I wear gloves when pulling the first two. Briony Morrow-Cribbs’ illustrations are gorgeous and perfect for this subject.

From the origins of current illegal drugs to the possible botanically-related cause behind the Salem witch trial, Stewart explores the varied use of plants, including as murder weapon, judge and executioner, recreational, and religious. She provides a list of poison gardens but didn’t include the one I unexpectedly visited on the Blarney Castle grounds in Ireland. It was fascinating. Stewart also name-drops some well-known historical figures along the way in this book.

I enjoyed Wicked Plants but I have one major complaint. I understand using the terms “wicked” and “evil” are provocative and great promotional terms, but I strongly disagree with that characterization. Just as a wolf or other predator is not wicked, but rather has a natural role in its ecosystem, these plants are creations of nature and they evolved these defenses against predators. They shouldn’t be villainized because people are using these plants in ways that are wicked or illegal in our human cultural context.

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The Innocent Wife by Amy Lloyd http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-innocent-wife-by-amy-lloyd/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-innocent-wife-by-amy-lloyd/ Mon, 09 Apr 2018 06:00:38 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe I stumbled upon The Innocent Wife by Amy Lloyd when scrolling through RiverShare OverDrive looking for my next read. I spend a lot of time commuting for both my work and my fiancé’s job. Having books easily accessible whenever I need them is one of the major reasons that I[Read more]

I stumbled upon The Innocent Wife by Amy Lloyd when scrolling through RiverShare OverDrive looking for my next read. I spend a lot of time commuting for both my work and my fiancé’s job. Having books easily accessible whenever I need them is one of the major reasons that I use the RiverShare OverDrive app available through the Library. (It sure beats having to haul a backpack full of books when a weekend work trip for my partner pops up at the last minute!) Anyway, I found The Innocent Wife on our last road trip and decided to give it a try.

The Innocent Wife by Amy Lloyd tells of the burgeoning love between Samantha and Dennis. Their love isn’t all sunshine, rainbows, and flowers though, as readers are quick to realize. Samantha lives in England and spends her time outside of work obsessing over the case of Dennis Danson. Dennis is a prison inmate who, over twenty years ago, was arrested and thusly imprisoned for the brutal murder of a young girl in Florida. Dennis’ case is full of mysteries as it comes out that multiple other girls disappeared in the same area around the same time. No one was ever arrested for those disappearances though, nor where any of the missing girls’ bodies found. Many residents of the area believe that Dennis abducted and killed the girls, but that police only had enough evidence to convict him of the murder that landed him in prison.

Dennis is now the subject of a true-crime documentary that has succeeded in grasping the attention of the  national media and social media. People online and in person have come to believe that Dennis was wrongly convicted and that they are the only ones who can uncover the truth. Samantha finds herself on these message boards and reaches out to Dennis to talk to him about his case. As the two communicate through letters, Samantha quickly finds herself wooed by his charm and kindness towards her. Uprooting her entire life, Samantha decides to travel to Florida, meet Dennis in person, and begin campaigning for his release.

As soon as Samantha steps out into the balmy Florida heat, she begins to feel uneasy. She continuously pushes her feelings to the back burner in order to put Dennis and the campaign for his release first. After all, everyone would have cold feet meeting someone in person for the first time, right? That would be awkward for anyone. Nevertheless Samantha decides to marry Dennis(NOT A SPOILER, GUYS! It’s called The Innocent Wife after all…). After they are married, major developments happen in Dennis’ case and Samantha is forced to face some uncomfortable realizations about both Dennis and herself. Her confidence in Dennis’ innocence begins to waver, but with the intense media scrutiny and their marriage, she still feels the need to stick by him. Samantha doesn’t know Dennis as well as she thought she did despite her initial unwavering support of his innocence. The more time she spends with Dennis, the more she realizes that she might not want to know the real truth about his past.

Give this book a read and let me know what you think. I had complicated feelings toward Samantha as a main character that almost made me want to read something else. There are also several other characters that both intrigued and slightly appalled me. I’m curious about your opinions.


This book is also available in the following format:

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Girls Trip http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/girls-trip/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/girls-trip/ Fri, 06 Apr 2018 06:00:42 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Guest post by Laura After several thought-provoking independent films, I wanted some entertainment that was sheer fun. Girls Trip was just the flick. Regina Hall, Queen Latifa, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Tiffany Haddish play lifelong friends who attend the Essence Festival in New Orleans. Truths are revealed, a blowout ensues,[Read more]

Guest post by Laura

After several thought-provoking independent films, I wanted some entertainment that was sheer fun. Girls Trip was just the flick. Regina Hall, Queen Latifa, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Tiffany Haddish play lifelong friends who attend the Essence Festival in New Orleans. Truths are revealed, a blowout ensues, bonds are reestablished, and much drinking and mayhem ensue throughout. The movie might have been set in Las Vegas, as one popular male-friend-escapade movie was placed, but New Orleans was a fine choice for the backdrop of architectural eye-candy and no-holds-barred atmosphere of the French Quarter at night.

In the vein of Bridesmaids, the ladies at times abandon all decorum and end up in some hilarious and one super-disgusting situation. The women are all good actors but I adored Tiffany Haddish’s performance. Her character was quite dysfunctional but was so loveable, funny, and brutally honest, that I could see why the others would continue to be friends with her anyway despite her foibles.

There were some lessons about being true to one’s self and about the importance of female friendships but those were just backstory for me. The ladies just having a great time in each other’s company was what I enjoyed most.

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Brave by Rose McGowan http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/brave-by-rose-mcgowan/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/brave-by-rose-mcgowan/ Thu, 05 Apr 2018 06:00:52 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe Brave  by Rose McGowan, is not a “tell-all” but instead a “tell-it-like-it-is” memoir of growing up in a cult in Italy, moving to the United States, living life as a runaway, eventually becoming a Hollywood starlet, and then leaving it all behind to pursue art and activism. At times, I felt[Read more]

Brave  by Rose McGowan, is not a “tell-all” but instead a “tell-it-like-it-is” memoir of growing up in a cult in Italy, moving to the United States, living life as a runaway, eventually becoming a Hollywood starlet, and then leaving it all behind to pursue art and activism. At times, I felt like an eavesdropper who was listening to things she probably shouldn’t be listening to; but I definitely confirmed my suspicion: that sexual assault victims will often be shamed for coming forward with accusations, especially about powerful or influential people. I think I’ve always known that victims risk public shaming and humiliation for choosing to speak out; but if you read the comment section on any of the videos or press releases that discuss Brave, you’ll see how cruel and dismissive people are behind the veil of the internet. McGowan discusses the cruelty of humanity and makes a special point to discuss how hurt she was to read such corrosive comments about herself online. Breaking the culture of silence and speaking openly and honestly about society’s elephants in the room (addiction, abuse, and mental illness come to mind) is truly heroic.

Maybe it’s not a totally shock that the Hollywood entertainment industry is exploitative at its core, but the kind of depravity and darkness that live there is probably unfathomable for outsiders. As consumers,  we need to be especially aware that what we consume – and what often appears glamorous, seductive, or exciting oftentimes conceals a dark underbelly of  disillusionment. For example, if you’ve ever seen Quentin Tarantino’s “Planet Terror”, you might not be aware that some of the movie plot bears an uncanny resemblance to some of McGowan’s personal life, and that she was made to perform feats of athleticism that would be unattainable for most women in tip-top physical condition. A more disturbing insight is that the cinema that we pay for and consume employs rape in order to tell a story, which is part and parcel of how violence, largely against women, becomes normalized. Oh, it’s just a tv show, or a movie, we say: but the unspoken truth is that it reflects social and cultural attitudes about the roles of men and women, largely that some men take what they want from women through “power” and domination. One of McGowan’s most incisive and profound questions: why are we still using rape as a method of storytelling in cinema at all?

As many people know, McGowan was one of the first women to come forward among more than 90 other women and accuse Harvey Weinstein of  rape. When she recounts her experience, she describes “depersonalization”, which occurs when you feel like you’re a stranger in your own body, viewing your life as though from the sidelines as an observer.  McGowan refers to the notoriously fallen movie “mogul” as “The Monster,” and her refusal to write or say his name, all the while spelling out other contextual details of her story, was her deliberate attempt at dethroning him. It is apparent from the tone of her voice and her unease when being interviewed on this subject that having to recall that day makes her physically ill.

McGowan has of course also been accused of being an “attention seeker” which is, in my opinion, a nasty and trite way of trying to shame her. Critics of McGowan fault her on the one hand for “telling it like it is” but in the same sentence shame for taking “hush money” and not calling Weinstein out immediately.  “Why did you wait until now to speak out?” they’ll taunt her. “You took the money,” they’ll say, without regard to any nuance or respect for her unique situation, as though the harrowing and psychologically damaging act of rape could possibly be boiled down into a black and white scenario that critics of McGowan would themselves navigate perfectly. McGowan poignantly makes her point when she says: “The only perfect rape victim is a dead rape victim and that’s a fact and it’s sad.” The simple act of speaking  is apparently so risky that it can earn you a scarlet letter; but McGowan won’t be deterred. As she says, she’s been called every awful name in the book, and worse. And still, she has the nerve and the conviction to keep her head up . I also try to keep in  mind that celebrity thrusts individuals into the line of fire and under the scope of public scrutiny.

I personally found McGowan’s candid commentary refreshing because she offers a no-holds-barred approach to honesty. In my estimation, it clearly sounds that she has spent many years thinking through these issues and can articulate herself masterfully. Brave is written by a woman who has accepted the past and wants to use her platform of celebrity to  help others, especially women, to recognize their value and to speak out when a predator is approaching.

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Underground Books: American War by Omar El Akkad http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/underground-books-american-war-by-omar-el-akkad/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/underground-books-american-war-by-omar-el-akkad/ Tue, 03 Apr 2018 06:00:14 -0500 Allison at Info Cafe Underground Books is a monthly book club that meets at 6:00 pm on the second Monday of the month at Main. We’re readers of books that are not typical book club fare – the subversive, the under-the radar, and the controversial. Every month, I’ll give a preview of what we’re reading,[Read more]

Underground Books is a monthly book club that meets at 6:00 pm on the second Monday of the month at Main. We’re readers of books that are not typical book club fare – the subversive, the under-the radar, and the controversial. Every month, I’ll give a preview of what we’re reading, questions the book raises and start a discussion online for those who can’t make in person. Welcome to The Underground!

Hello readers! This month’s book is the 2017 novel American War by Omar El Akkad. Set roughly 60 years in the future in an America ravaged by climate change and a second civil war, it’s a story about the destruction of a nation, a family and a person by war. A cautionary tale that raises serious issues about our current national and global state of affairs, and what the future may hold. A heavy subject, yes, but worth the journey.

Opening in 2075,  the earth has warmed, the oceans have enveloped the coasts and submerged what little is left after increasingly severe storms batter the land. In response to multiple environmental disasters across the continent, the federal government – now based in Columbus, Ohio – bans the use of fossil fuels. The southern states defy the ban, and after a series of terrorist attacks culminating in the assassination of the president, the U.S. is again plunged into civil war.  This is a war of modern times –  out-of-control drones, homicide bombers, guerilla warfare, detainment camps and biological weapons deployed against an entire state.

The novel follows the Chestnut family of flood-prone Louisiana, displaced from their home by the Battles of East Texas to an overcrowded refugee camp on the border of Tennessee. Here Sarat Chestnut comes of age among the mundane cruelties of war.  She and her family – her older brother Simon, twin sister Dana, and mother Martina – try to make a life for themselves while waiting for the end of the war.  Sarat, already considered an outsider because of her tall and awkward build, grows rebellious and is befriended by a mysterious older man who once fought overseas for the North, or, at least, the North when the country was whole. He feeds her a steady diet of Southern mythos, sending her on a path to become an instrument of revenge.  As the narrator says in the prologue, “This isn’t a story about war. It’s about ruin.”

Assorted musings:

  • When I chose this book, I based it on, of course, the numerous good reviews it had received, and I was intrigued by concept. Given the current political climate, the possibility of another civil war in the U.S. has been raised more than once. What surprised me, however, was that the crux of the war was fossil fuels. I can understand the idea of Southern states objecting to the exercise of broad federal power, and a desire to protect mining and off-shore drilling, but what I noticed most was the absence of any mention of race or ethnicity. At the start of the novel, Sarat is described as having “fuzzy” hair, and that her father had immigrated from Mexico, but that’s the only mention of race in the entire novel. I suppose the argument could be made that by 2075, race is no longer an issue, but if we’re still arguing about red vs. blue and states’ rights vs. federal authority, I have a hard time suspending that disbelief.
  • The author is an award-winning journalist born in Egypt, raised in Qatar, now living in Oregon, and he reported extensively on Afghanistan, Guantanamo Bay and the Arab Spring. El Akkad’s journalistic expertise is apparent in this novel, as major aspects of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are transported to America. In many cases, it’s a note-for-note transcription. I wonder if that works for everyone? While the purpose of the novel is, arguably, to create empathy for the very real wars happening now and to also serve as a cautionary tale, could the novel have taken more liberties? I don’t mean that it should have been a Hunger Games-esque battle royale, but something more adapted to the setting.

Quotes I would have underlined if it wasn’t a library book:

“How long ago was this?” she asked.
“Must have been around ’21 or ’22,” said Gaines.  “Around the time they sent us over there for the third time, right around the Fifth Spring.”
Joe leaned close to Sarat; he looked at the photograph again. “That’s right,” he said. “I remember, I remember when it was still your guns and our blood.” (p. 139)

She remembered something Albert Gaines once told her all those years ago in Patience. He said when a Southerner tells you what they’re fighting for, you can agree or disagree, but you can’t ever call it a lie. Right or wrong, he said, a man from our country always says exactly what he means , and stands by what he says.
Even that, it turned out, was a lie. (p. 278)

You fight the war with guns, you fight the peace with stories. (p. 280)

What do you think? Let me know in the comments! And join us on April 9th at 6:00 at Main to discuss in real life! Next month, we’ll be reading Difficult Women by Roxane Gay – copies available at Main, or pick one up wherever convenient!

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Online Reading Challenge – April http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-april/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-april/ Mon, 02 Apr 2018 06:00:08 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hurrah! It’s April which means flowers and birdsong and springtime! And, it means it’s time for the next installment of the Online Reading Challenge! This month we’re traveling to the 1800s! “Whoa!” I can hear you say. “1800s?! Isn’t that kind of a broad time period?! Like, everything happened in[Read more]

Hurrah! It’s April which means flowers and birdsong and springtime! And, it means it’s time for the next installment of the Online Reading Challenge! This month we’re traveling to the 1800s!

“Whoa!” I can hear you say. “1800s?! Isn’t that kind of a broad time period?! Like, everything happened in the 1800s!” OK, not everything happened in the 1800s, but I admit, a lot did happen. Which just means you have even more great books (and movies) to choose from. To make it a little easier, I’ve divided some suggestions by event/era.

Regency. This is the time period of Jane Austen, which enough said. If you haven’t read Jane Austen, here’s your chance. My favorite is Persuasion, but I love the others of the “big four” (Emma, Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility) We could (well, I could) spend an entire reading year discussing these books and debating the merits of the many movies that have been made from them (by far, my favorite movie is Sense and Sensibility starring Emma Thompson although I also dearly love the BBC’s production of Emma.)

If Jane Austen isn’t your thing (which I can’t even fathom), I highly recommend the Master and Commander series by Patrick O’Brian. Set in the world of tall ships, when the British Navy ruled supreme, this is a series (20 volumes!) full of adventure, intrigue, heartbreak and humor. Highly recommended.

Civil War. There are a lot of books set during the Civil War and for good reason. It’s a time that defined the American character in many ways and it was a sharp divide between the past and the future. Look for authors Jeff and Michael Shaara and Shelby Foote. Or go classic with Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell or Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane.  Another excellent option is Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier.

Victorian. Ah, so many books. Lots and lots of mysteries in this category including Sherlock Holmes. I really liked the mysteries by Deanna Raybourn and Tasha Alexander – strong women characters and charming settings. Light and fun.

Some random recommendations include Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier about the discovery of fossils by ordinary women, Little Women by Louisa May Alcott and Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton.

You’ll notice that there aren’t any titles about the “Wild West” – we’ll be reading about Westward Expansion in a few months, so I’m keeping those titles for that time period.

I’m going to read The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry about a young widow who moves from London to the country and finds herself drawn into a mystery. Sounds intriguing!

That’s just the tip of the iceberg – be sure to stop by one of our Davenport locations for displays with lots more titles to consider. And don’t forget to tell us what you pick!

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Tracking the Tracts: Researching the World War I Government Housing Project in Davenport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/29/tracking-the-tracts-researching-the-world-war-i-government-housing-project-in-davenport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/29/tracking-the-tracts-researching-the-world-war-i-government-housing-project-in-davenport/ Thu, 29 Mar 2018 17:12:47 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections As a follow-up to Alma Gaul’s story “Homes for the Homefront: 600-plus homes were built for war workers” in the Quad-City Times this past Sunday, we would like to share these two panoramic photographs of the Black Hawk Addition (or … Continue reading

As a follow-up to Alma Gaul’s story “Homes for the Homefront: 600-plus homes were built for war workers” in the Quad-City Times this past Sunday, we would like to share these two panoramic photographs of the Black Hawk Addition (or McManus Tract) in Davenport. This tract was developed during the First World War by the United States Housing Corporation in response to the increase in the number of war production workers employed at the Rock Island Arsenal and other Quad-Cities companies.

Black Hawk Addition looking north, Acc#1998-28 Hostetler-Free Studio of Photography Collection, #dplpanoramic052

 

A workcrew at the site of the Black Hawk Addition, Acc#1998-28 Hostetler-Free Studio of Photography Collection, #dplpanoramic053

All of the 172 Black Hawk Addition houses shown in these photographs, built in late 1918-1919, are still standing today. This is according to the architectural survey conducted by James E. Jacobsen in 1998, a copy of which is available here at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center. For those interested in greater detail about “Iowa’s only example of emergency defense housing,” including the King and Park Lane Tracts in Davenport (unrealized), it is a rich resource. The Center also holds a set of photocopies of the photographs documenting the progress of the UHSC project from the National Archives.

Related sources available here at the Center include the records of Temple & Burrows, the architectural firm tasked with the design of the eight house types in the Black Hawk Addition (Acc#1998-29, Temple & Burrows and Acc#2013-25, Seth Temple, Architect). 

Press coverage of the project can be traced using our historical newspaper collections on microfilm; City of Davenport building permits help plot later changes to the homes; city directories identify the succession of homeowners up to the present day.

“A Walking Tour of 1918 Government Housing” from our Ephemera Collection gives the history of the houses designed by architect Olof Cervin for the neighborhoods developed in Rock Island as part of the government project.

Dig deeper into the history of city’s urban fabric here at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center of the Davenport Public Library!

(posted by Katie)

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A Celebration of Spring: Blooms of the Past http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/23/a-celebration-of-spring-blooms-of-the-past/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/23/a-celebration-of-spring-blooms-of-the-past/ Fri, 23 Mar 2018 16:46:37 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We hope Loretta Clayton’s hand-painted/retouched photographs of the floral displays at the old Vander Veer Park Conservatory* have you thinking happy spring thoughts despite tomorrow’s snowy forecast! The conservatory at Vander Veer still creates seasonal exhibits — a perfect place to … Continue reading

We hope Loretta Clayton’s hand-painted/retouched photographs of the floral displays at the old Vander Veer Park Conservatory* have you thinking happy spring thoughts despite tomorrow’s snowy forecast!

Vander Veer Conservatory c. 1940 – Loretta Clayton Donation. 2003-43 Box 1 Folder 40 Image 4.

Vander Veer Conservatory c. 1940 – Loretta Clayton Donation. 2003-43 Box 1 Folder 39 Image 3.

Vander Veer Conservatory c. 1940 – Loretta Clayton Donation. 2003-43 Box 1 Folder 39 Image 3.

The conservatory at Vander Veer still creates seasonal exhibits — a perfect place to explore any day of the year. Visit the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center to discover more about how the arrival of spring was celebrated at Davenport’s city parks in years past!

(posted by Amy D.)

*The original conservatory where these photographs were taken was built in 1897. It was torn down in 1954 and replaced by a new conservatory in November of the following year.

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The Sarsfield Guards: The first bi-state St. Patrick’s Parades http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/16/the-sarsfield-guards-the-first-bi-state-st-patricks-parades/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/16/the-sarsfield-guards-the-first-bi-state-st-patricks-parades/ Fri, 16 Mar 2018 13:37:10 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Saturday, March 17, 2018 at 11:30 a.m., the 33rd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Grand Parade will start in Rock Island, Illinois, cross the Talbot Memorial Bridge (formerly the Centennial Bridge), and end in Davenport, Iowa. This much-beloved event is the … Continue reading

Saturday, March 17, 2018 at 11:30 a.m., the 33rd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Grand Parade will start in Rock Island, Illinois, cross the Talbot Memorial Bridge (formerly the Centennial Bridge), and end in Davenport, Iowa. This much-beloved event is the only bi-state parade in the United States.

Imagine our surprise when we recently discovered the current St. Patrick’s Day Grand Parade had a bi-state predecessor. As it turns out, a small Davenport militia group briefly celebrated its anniversary and St. Patrick’s Day with a bi-state parade in the mid-nineteenth century.

When Iowa became a Territory in 1838, state and local militias were formed. The State militia was overseen by territorial legislature. Men wanting to be appointed as commanders in the State militia were first nominated and voted on in local government. The names were then sent to the territorial legislature where they were voted on again to attain a position in the state military.

The formation of local militia groups was more relaxed in comparison to the State militia service. To form a local militia group one would simply ask for local men to sign up, name the group, possibly elect officials or form by-laws, and then write to the Iowa Territory legislature to introduce themselves and request weapons.

If you received a positive letter back and weapons, you were a militia group in the Territory of Iowa.

The Davenport, Rock Island, & Moline Directory, 1858-59 listed local militia groups as the Davenport Rifle Corps, Davenport City Artillery, Davenport Sarsfield Guards, and Davenport City Guards. It is the Davenport Sarsfield Guards with a connection to St. Patrick’s Day parades.

The formation of the Sarsfield Guards militia group was announced in February 1858. Named after Irish military hero Patrick Sarsfield, 1st Earl of Lucan, many of the founding members were recent Irish immigrants. The first official meeting was held on March 11, 1858. The meeting included the adoption of a Constitution, by-laws, and election of officers.

Daily Iowa State Democrat, March 13, 1858. pg. 1.

The Sarsfield Guards were mentioned in local newspapers throughout 1858 in reference to drilling and formation exercises. The organization also began to hold balls as a means to fund raise to purchase uniforms. The only issue that appeared during these early months was the delay in receiving weapons from the Territory legislature. By early September, the shipment of muskets arrived and with enough money raised from balls, uniforms were purchased.

By March 1859, the Guards were ready to celebrate their 1st anniversary as a militia organization. The decision was made to parade on St. Patrick’s Day to Rock Island in full attire and celebrate in the evening with a dinner in Davenport. Newspaper accounts from March 18th indicated the original plans marching plans had to be altered due to rainy weather. The Guards instead celebrated in only Davenport.

Daily Iowa State Democrat, March 4, 1859. pg. 1.

Throughout 1859, the Sarsfield Guards were in high demand for parades and balls. Drilling was still a high priority for the group. Whenever unrest seemed to settle in Davenport, the local militia groups would take turns staying in the local Armory on alert in case they were needed.

Soon the 2nd anniversary of the Guards was near. This time they were able to fulfill their promise to Rock Island.

On St. Patrick’s Day, the Sarsfield Guards emerged from the local Armory in full uniform. They paraded through Davenport, attended service at St. Margaret’s Catholic Church, and then marched to Rock Island where they paraded through the streets and received refreshments.

Daily Democrat and News, March 19, 1860. pg. 1.

With the success of the march through Davenport and Rock Island in 1860, an invitation was extended for the Guards in 1861 to parade again through both cities in honor of St. Patrick. The only change would be marching on March 18th instead of the 17th. The reason for the change was simple. March 17th fell on a Sunday in 1861 and parading was not done.

Daily Democrat and News, March 14, 1861. pg. 1.

Once again, newspaper accounts after the parade detailed a wonderful event with the Guards marching to Rock Island with the Union Band playing, attending mass in Rock Island, military displays, and refreshments before returning to Davenport to march.

Sadly, this would be the last time the Sarsfield Guards marched to Rock Island for St. Patrick’s Day. All local militia soon faced a drastic change.

With the start of the Civil War on April 12, 1861, the direction of local militias in Iowa altered. On April 26, 1861, the Sarsfield Guards ceased to exist as they merged with other local companies to form under the name the Davenport City Guards. Many from the original Sarsfield Guards would soon volunteer for the Union Army.

By November 1861, notices were appearing in local papers for remaining Sarsfield Guards members to return their muskets at once. These weapons issued from the State of Iowa were needed in the war effort.

Daily Democrat and News, November 12, 1861. pg. 1

Local militias still existed in Iowa after the Civil War, but the Sarsfield Guards were never re-formed. In 1877, the Iowa Militia became the Iowa National Guard and local militias began to fade away.

The old Sarsfield Guards were called to action only once after April 1861. The event that brought them together was the funeral of their former Captain and Civil War veteran, Col. Robert M. Littler.

The Daily Times, January 26, 1897. pg. 5.

One can imagine the memories shared that January day in 1897, as they remembered younger days in bright uniforms parading through Davenport and Rock Island on those few memorable St. Patrick’s Days.

(posted by Amy D.)

Sources

  • Daily Iowa State Democrat, March 13, 1858, 1.
  • Daily Iowa State Democrat, March 25, 1858, 1.
  • Daily Iowa State Democrat, June 22, 1858, 1.
  • Daily Iowa State Democrat, August 28, 1858, 1.
  • The Daily Morning News, September 6, 1858, 1.
  • Daily Iowa State Democrat. March 4, 1859, 1.
  • Davenport Daily Gazette, March 18, 1859, 1.
  • Daily Democrat and News, March 19, 1860, 1.
  • Daily Democrat and News, March 14, 1861, 1.
  • Daily Democrat and News, March 19, 1981, 1.
  • Daily Democrat and News, April 27, 1861, 1.
  • Davenport Weekly Leader, January 29, 1897, 1.
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1910: “Alien” Women Arrive in Davenport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/10/1910-alien-women-arrive-in-davenport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/03/10/1910-alien-women-arrive-in-davenport/ Sat, 10 Mar 2018 18:49:50 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections With the celebration of International Women’s Day this week and Women’s History Month, we are focusing our attention on the women who came to live in Davenport from other parts of the world in the early years of the twentieth … Continue reading

With the celebration of International Women’s Day this week and Women’s History Month, we are focusing our attention on the women who came to live in Davenport from other parts of the world in the early years of the twentieth century. The 1910 United States Federal Census for the city helps us bring some of them to light.

Young single women such as Josephine Haut of Karlsbad, Germany often came to the United States to work as domestic servants. She arrived in 1907, at age 17, and was employed by the well-to-do family of Benjamin Franklin Aufderheide (Vice President and Secretary of the Steffen Dry Goods Company) at 430 West 8th Street. City directories list Josephine’s occupation as “domestic” until her marriage to Rudolph Keller in 1916.

While Germans like Josephine still comprised the largest group of immigrants to the area, by the turn of the century the Davenport population began to see more Eastern and Southern European countries represented. Among single women, for example, we find recently-arrived Julia Jacobs (age 19) of Poland working as a maid for the Hotel Davenport. Josie Zerba (18), Mary Regi Mikotsjchk (18), and Carrie Germaska (25), also fresh from Poland, worked as domestics at Adolph and Margaret Kuehlcke’s Unter Den Linden hotel and cafe at 431 West 3rd Street.

Wives and daughters were far more numerous than single women among Davenport’s recent immigrants in 1910. Two young mothers from Italy, Marie Finmare (26) and Mary Gentilini (24), lived together with their families at 523 and 523 1/2 West 2nd Street. Marie’s husband Dominic is listed in the 1910 census as the proprietor of a fruit store; his wife probably worked alongside him while also caring for her four children under five years of age. The Finmares spoke English, having arrived in the U.S. ten years earlier; perhaps Italian-only speakers Mary Gentilini and her husband Giuseppe relied on them, their neighbors and likely their relatives, to communicate with others in the city.  On the same block lived another recent immigrant family from Italy, Hester and Anthony Laprovisa and their baby daughter.

A large concentration of recent Greek immigrants (on Front, Harrison, and 2nd Streets) included very few women. Only Georgia, wife of laborer George Teros, Viva, wife of laborer John Poupalous, Ellssavet, wife of billiard hall owner George Landis, and Rosa, wife of baker Mikes Kapandis number among the nearly 300 individuals born in Greece who were living in that part of the city.

Women in the Hungarian families of Davenport probably worked hard accommodating their many countrymen who came here to work as laborers. Julia Werelily, Mary Hardie, and Katharina Lingen’s households each included ten single men listed as roomers in the census.

There were also many Jewish families newly arrived from Russia in Davenport. Widow Dora Estess headed up a family of five on West 2nd; close neighbors Fannie Lebolt, Lillie Rosenberg, and Bessie Benkel could all speak Yiddish with one another’s families further down on the same street.  The “D”  in the name D. Isenberg & Co., “Manufacturers and Repairers of Umbrellas and Parasols” (1910 city directory) suggests that Mier Isenberg’s wife Dora may have been the talent that made the business at 308 West 3rd Street successful.

Visit the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center at the Davenport Public Library to find out more about the multi-ethnic character of Davenport in the early 1900’s and the women–perhaps your own female forbears–who played an important part in its creation.

(posted by Katie)

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Davenporters of Note: African American Soldiers in WWI http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/28/davenporters-of-note-african-american-soldiers-in-wwi/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/28/davenporters-of-note-african-american-soldiers-in-wwi/ Wed, 28 Feb 2018 17:20:04 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In celebration of Black History Month 2018, we have been searching for information on the African American soldiers from Davenport and Scott County who served in the U.S. Army one hundred years ago in the First World War. In October … Continue reading

In celebration of Black History Month 2018, we have been searching for information on the African American soldiers from Davenport and Scott County who served in the U.S. Army one hundred years ago in the First World War.

In October of 1917, the local draft boards conscripted the first three African American men from the area and sent them to Camp Dodge in Des Moines: Gilbert Thomas of 1105 Scott Street, Oliver Richardson of 318 East 10th Street, and Henry Pitts of Bettendorf. [1]  These men likely traveled to the camp in a rail car separate from those of the white registrants. [2]  Once at Camp Dodge, Thomas, Richardson, and Pitts quickly passed examinations by the district draft boards and were accepted for military service. [3]

Later contingents of local African American draftees departing for Camp Dodge in July of 1918 were treated to a “fitting sendoff” by the Colored Women’s Unit of the Red Cross, based at the Bethel A.M.E. Church.

Daily Times (Davenport, Iowa), July 10, 1918.

The names of those who left on August 1, 1918 were listed in the newspapers:

Edward M. Cain, 1022 Western Avenue
Rufus Chapel
William J. Atkins, 1509 Fourth Avenue, Rock Island
Samuel Bailey, 119 1/2 East Fourth Street
Adolph J, Anderson, 329 West Tenth Street
Harry Cameron
Benjamin J. Wyatt, 719 Harrison Street
Harry W. Roberts, 920 Harrison Street
Glenn Burns, 118 East Fifth Street
William E. Sample, 320 West Eleventh Street [4]

One of this group, Benjamin Wyatt, wrote home from the Camp just a week later a with a positive report. He said “..a number of us boys from Davenport…have been assigned to non-commissioned officers’ training school…we have the name of being the finest, smartest and cleanest bunch of men ever in this camp…” [5]

 

The first three African American draftees from the area, Gilbert Thomas, Oliver Richardson and Henry Pitts, along with Davenporter Jerry Leon Carter, sailed for France with the 366th Infantry of the 92nd Division in June of 1918 and met with plenty of action upon reaching the front.  In November 1918, the men in the regiment faced fearsome enemy artillery fire as they came out of the trenches and “over the top.” The troops waited for a tense and silent half-hour in the forest outside of Metz to hear news of the armistice-signing that would mean avoiding another engagement with the enemy.  When it came, as Corporal Hunter Mullen of Moline told the story “in the vivid language of his race” to the Davenport Daily Times, a single “glad cry” sparked hours of celebration in which “pent up spirits found expression.” [6]

The further adventures of Private Jerry Leon Carter in France included shooting a German soldier out of a tree and falling into a river off an unfinished bridge during a scouting party raid on the town of Eply. [7]

Oliver Richardson, a graduate of Davenport High School and former waiter at the Commercial Club [8] helped defend the French city of Frapelle from attacks by the Germans in September 1918. Having been promoted to the rank of Sergeant Major, he then led the battalion in both the Argonne and Toul sectors. “For months [he] was in the trenches, spending two weeks there at times without relief.” [9]  Richardson was about to begin an officers’ training course at Langres, France when the armistice was signed. Instead, he continued to follow the Germans in retreat. To his mother in Davenport, Alice Richardson, he wrote of the good weather, “which has been no small factor in helping our armies on their march Berlinward.”

None of the men in this “local quartet” of African American soldiers were injured during their wartime experience.

Like Oliver Richardson, Davenporters George Young and Louis Henry also served at the rank of Sergeant Major in another of the “colored” regiments: the 804th Pioneer Infantry. Writing from the French village of St. Jean near Verdun in February 1919, Henry said of the 804th, “we were just a little too late to get into the big game of war owing to the signing of the armistice…” [10] 

Louis Henry and Oliver Richardson were founding members of the Marshall Brown Post of the American Legion in Davenport. [11]

Louis Henry receiving an award from the Bethel A.M.E. Church in Davenport, from the Times-Democrat, August 17, 1964, 24.

Please contact us at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center of the Davenport Public Library if you have any further information you would like to share about the African American soldiers and their families mentioned in this post.

(posted by Katie)

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Source Notes

  1. “Draft Boards to Send Three Negroes to Camp,” Democrat and Leader, October 18, 1917; “Colored Men in Drafted Troops,” Daily Times, October 27, 1917;“City Sends First Colored Troops: Three Men in Contingent That Departed Saturday for Camp Dodge,” Democrat and Leader, October 28, 1917.
  2. “Segregation Rule Applies to Five Negroes: Colored Conscripts from Davenport May Ride in Private Coach” Democrat and Leader, August 30, 1917.
  3. “Two Negroes Are Passed,” Daily Times, November 17, 1917, 5; “Henry Pitts is Accepted,” Daily Times, November 17, 1917, 10.
  4. “City to Give 100 More Men” Daily Times, July 27, 1918; “100 Leave for Camp Forrest Next Tuesday” Democrat and Leader, Juy 28, 1918, 10.
  5. “Colored Soldier Writes,” Democrat and Leader, August 11, 1918.
  6. “Last Half-Hour of War an Age of Suspense,” Daily Times, March 22, 1919, 7.
  7. ”Davenport Colored Veterans Who Participated in Fighting On Three Fronts in Great War,” Daily Times, March 27, 1919.
  8. “Former Club Attendant is Now Promoted,” Democrat and Leader, November 27, 1818, 11.
  9. “Local Negro Soldiers Win Army Laurels,” Daily Times, February 13, 1919, 8.
  10. “Writes Letter of Thanks to the Democrat,” Democrat and Leader, March 23, 1919, 4.
  11. “Colored Men of World War Organize Post,” Daily Times, April 21, 1920, 8.
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Newspaper Love Notes: February 14, 1918 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/14/newspaper-love-notes-february-14-1918/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/14/newspaper-love-notes-february-14-1918/ Wed, 14 Feb 2018 16:19:33 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In the February 14, 1918 issue of the Davenport Democrat, the marriage of locals Sgt. George Marsh Sheets and Louise Baird was celebrated in connection with a controversy over the conditions at Camp Cody in Deming, New Mexico. Named for LeClaire … Continue reading

In the February 14, 1918 issue of the Davenport Democrat, the marriage of locals Sgt. George Marsh Sheets and Louise Baird was celebrated in connection with a controversy over the conditions at Camp Cody in Deming, New Mexico. Named for LeClaire native William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody, the camp where volunteers from the Scott County National Guard field artillery units were training had recently been disparaged by Iowa governor W.L. Harding. The Democrat‘s editorial disputed the governor’s characterization of the camp as a “cold hell,” claiming “…there have been more weddings than deaths…” there. (p. 6)

On the very same day, the Democrat reported on another marriage-related story: George F. Crosse of Des Moines was sentenced to six months in jail and a $500 fine for posing by way of newspaper advertisements as “Lucile Love,” a girl in search of a husband. Once a victim proposed marriage, Crosse would agree to a wedding and “write for money to be used in defraying expenses of the trip.” Judge M.J. Wade declared that these “matrimonial advertisements” ought to be banned because they “…pandered to moral perverts and outraged the sacred institutions of love and marriage.” (p. 2)

Truer expressions of love could not be hampered by wartime efforts to economize, as the Davenport Daily Times (p. 7) reported on Valentine’s Day, 1918:

Happy Valentine’s Day from the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center!

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National Pizza Day 2018: The Quad Cities’ Pizza Pie Past http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/09/national-pizza-day-2018-the-quad-cities-pizza-pie-past/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/09/national-pizza-day-2018-the-quad-cities-pizza-pie-past/ Fri, 09 Feb 2018 13:55:19 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections February 9th is National Pizza Day!  The first place to serve pizza in the Quad Cities was Tony’s Pizzeria, inside the Paddock Club in Rock Island, Illinois. Oscar Liske took over ownership of the club formerly known as The Horsehoe … Continue reading

February 9th is National Pizza Day! 

The first place to serve pizza in the Quad Cities was Tony’s Pizzeria, inside the Paddock Club in Rock Island, Illinois. Oscar Liske took over ownership of the club formerly known as The Horsehoe on April 15, 1952, and Tony Maniscalco began tossing dough in its kitchen soon after that.

The Daily Times, Friday, June 27, 1952, p. 12A

The Daily Times, Saturday, August 9, 1952, p. 4A

The Harrison Grille called itself “Davenport’s 1st Pizzeria” in this newspaper advertisement published in November of 1953. The Grille had been operating since the 1930’s and had recently come under new ownership. 

The Daily Times, Wednesday, November 11, 1953, p. 3G

Later in the 1950’s, the Italian Village opened across the street at 220 Harrison. The restaurant was incorporated on June 10, 1955 by Oscar Liske, manager of the Paddock Club. The building had been previously occupied by Johnny Hartman’s Restaurant. 

The Daily Times, Friday, April 27, 1956, p. 35

Have you any memories of pizza-eating in the QC to share?

 

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#ColorOurCollections http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/08/colorourcollections/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/08/colorourcollections/ Thu, 08 Feb 2018 13:14:24 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Celebrate the 3rd Annual #ColorOurCollections, a week-long coloring fest on social media, hosted by New York Academy of Medicine! From February 5th through 9th, libraries, archives, and other cultural institutions have created free coloring books and sheets from materials in … Continue reading

Celebrate the 3rd Annual #ColorOurCollections, a week-long coloring fest on social media, hosted by New York Academy of Medicine! From February 5th through 9th, libraries, archives, and other cultural institutions have created free coloring books and sheets from materials in their collections.

We are happy to share the 1st Annual Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center Coloring Book.  On our blog website, check out our new #ColorOurCollections page to download your own copy of our coloring book.

The New York Academy of Medicine hosts our coloring book and many others. Please, click the link and explore all the other coloring collections: http://library.nyam.org/colorourcollections/richardson-sloane-special-collections-center-davenport-public-library-coloring-book/

Join us today, February 8th, in coloring our collections at Main (321 Main Street) on at 2:00 pm. Color the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s coloring book at our pop-up program.

Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center, Davenport Public Library Coloring Book

 

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The Origins of Davenport’s Friendly House http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/02/the-origins-of-davenports-friendly-house/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2018/02/02/the-origins-of-davenports-friendly-house/ Fri, 02 Feb 2018 16:34:07 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Friendly House has been serving the citizens of Davenport since 1896. With services such as childcare, an in-house food pantry, organized local outings, and events for seniors, Friendly House is a space specifically designed to aid and engage people of … Continue reading

Friendly House has been serving the citizens of Davenport since 1896. With services such as childcare, an in-house food pantry, organized local outings, and events for seniors, Friendly House is a space specifically designed to aid and engage people of all ages and backgrounds within an affordable communal setting. Perhaps you know of someone who takes advantage of its services on a regular basis, or maybe you have driven past the building at 1221 Myrtle Street and wondered how Friendly House came to be?

Noting that a number of people in Davenport lacked day-to-day necessities when the city was undergoing major development, the Reverend Edward D. Lee founded a small mission in 1895. The following year, on April 27, 1896, the organization became the People’s Union Mission. The “Ned Lee Mission,” as it was known (in honor of its founder), rented space at 207 East 2nd Street. In 1903, a new building at 313 East 2nd Street was purchased.

Davenport Daily Leader, March 19, 1896, 3.

The primary aim of the Mission was “the improvement, moral, educational, industrial and religious, of such persons in the city of Davenport, Iowa, as it can reach and bring under the influence of its work.” Some of the many services and amenities provided were a gymnasium, kindergarten and Sunday school classes, outdoor events, and space for meetings and religious services. For a time, the Mission also provided clothing, meals, and lodging for people in need.

By the turn of the century, the Mission faced considerable debt due to its very success. Judge Nathaniel French came to the rescue in January of 1906 with both organizational and financial assistance.

The year 1911 saw Ned Lee’s resignation and the beginning of Harry E. Downer and Alfred C. Mueller’s leadership. At this point, the board dropped the organization’s religious affiliation. On November 17, 1911, the Mission was officially renamed “Friendly House.”

The following year, Friendly House moved to a new location: Claus Groth Gilde Hall at Third and Taylor Streets. Judge French once again contributed significantly to the purchase of the $13,000 property. The new location included a branch of the public library, public baths, playrooms and game rooms, a gymnasium, and a theater (the latter of which was used for outside organizations, gatherings, and a polling place, in addition to dramatic productions). Some of the many programs offered included athletic and dramatic clubs, Boy Scouts and Campfire Girls, Saturday motion pictures, kindergarten and English classes, and classes in sewing, cooking, folk dancing, dressmaking, knitting, crocheting, and chorus singing.

Students using the deposit collection at the Friendly House, 1916. (VM89-002206)

 

On January 16, 1925, at 3:30 A.M., disaster struck Friendly House. A fire nearly burned the building to the ground.

Davenport Democrat and Leader, January 16, 1925, 1.

Davenport Democrat and Leader, June 15, 1926, 14.

 Thanks to the support of the German Free School and a memorial gift from the family of Judge French, a new building was constructed. The “Nathaniel French Memorial” opened in June of 1926.  

Higher attendance in the late 1920’s (87,157 people in the first year after re-opening!) and into the Great Depression years led Friendly House, once again, into financial difficulties. The Civic Planning Committee provided some stability, but many of the employees still felt it necessary to give up part of their pay to keep Friendly House afloat. Harry Downer acknowledged their sacrifices:

“Friendly House has a galaxy of unselfish friends who are inspired by a wish to help others and give freely of their time and talents that the world may be a better place in which to live. No one who works casually and on impulse is of value in this sort of thing. Those who glorify this welfare service are those who give regularly this time and thought to philanthropy, sustained by self-forgetfulness and the earnest desire to aid other folks, and find their reward in the consciousness of unselfish efforts.”

In December of 1938, Friendly House celebrated its 25th anniversary. By that time, the Downers had resigned as Head Residents and Ella Meisner had taken over. The organization continued its outreach in Davenport through the next several decades, moving its location to 1221 Myrtle Street in 1993.

Today, Friendly House still offers many services for youth, families, and senior citizens alike. There are preschool and afterschool care programs, educational scholarships, emergency assistance, volunteer activities, local outings, the Childcare Food Program (CACFP), family literacy nights, and rentals of the facility’s community room, gym, and pavilion.

Friendly House’s current aim, “to respond to the needs of children, families and seniors through quality, affordable services that will enrich lives and strengthen our neighborhoods and the community…” remains faithful to Reverend Lee’s original 1895 mission statement.

As Alfred C. Mueller famously said, “Friendly House is a neighborhood settlement – but its neighborhood is Davenport.”

For more information about Friendly House today, be sure to visit their website at www.friendlyhouseiowa.org.

(posted by Anna T.)

______________________________________________________________

Sources:

A Short History of Friendly House. Davenport, Iowa: Friendly House, 1946.

 

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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