Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2017 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Behind Closed Doors by B.A. Paris http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/behind-closed-doors-by-b-a-paris/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/behind-closed-doors-by-b-a-paris/ Fri, 22 Sep 2017 06:00:23 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe When it comes to finding a new book to read, I’ve finally figured out what my favorite genre is. I love thrillers. Give me a story with a well-developed plot line, fully fleshed out characters, and make sure the story is gripping. Psychological thrillers with a hint of crazy and[Read more]

When it comes to finding a new book to read, I’ve finally figured out what my favorite genre is. I love thrillers. Give me a story with a well-developed plot line, fully fleshed out characters, and make sure the story is gripping. Psychological thrillers with a hint of crazy and a lot of suspense are my go-to novels. I recently stumbled across another B.A. Paris novel called Behind Closed Doors and since I liked another of her novels a lot, I decided to try this one.

Behind Closed Doors messed with my head, but in a good way. This book is a perfect illustration of the fact that what we present to the world is not our true selves. Jack and Grace are the perfect couple. He has the wealth and the good looks to back it up, while she exudes charm and elegance at all the dinner parties they throw. You just can’t help but like them and maybe even wish your own relationship was like theirs. Their life is so well put together and perfect.

There’s only one small hiccup: Grace and Jack are never apart. He does go to work, but Grace is never seen anywhere without Jack. While some may say it’s because they are still in their newlywed period and are madly in love, others may find it odd. Grace doesn’t work, in fact she gave up her job shortly after they were married, but she never meets up with anyone for lunch or coffee. She has a plethora of excuses. The parties they throw are so extravagant and decadent, but Grace’s figure never changes. In fact, she is incredibly tiny. Grace doesn’t own a cell phone and all emails are sent to Jack’s email. She leaves the house with an empty purse, their house is gated and immensely private, and there are bars on one of the windows. What is really happening between Jack and Grace?

All those factors are overlooked because he is so kind and doting, while she is such a fabulous cook and fantastic gardener. Jack has even agreed to let Millie, Grace’s special-needs sister, move into their house when she turns 18. He’s designing her perfect and most-wished-for bedroom and wants the house to be just right when she moves in. He keeps mistakenly saying her bedroom is red though, when her favorite color is yellow. Why? What is going on? There are just so many slightly off comments and strange facts that point to some area of conflict within their marriage, but their perfect façade trumps all.

Without saying too much and giving away a major portion of the plot, I found this book to be terrifyingly psychological. Paris succeeded in getting in my head and had me wondering what was happening in Jack and Grace’s marriage and why each respective character behaves the way that they do. I was unsettled throughout this book because the story that Paris weaves is so believable. I found myself questioning the relationships of the people around me. I was immediately gripped by this novel and finished it in two days. Definitely recommended.


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Hello Sunshine by Laura Dave http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/hello-sunshine-by-laura-dave/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/hello-sunshine-by-laura-dave/ Thu, 21 Sep 2017 06:00:43 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Sunshine Mackenzie is living her best life – a hugely popular YouTube cooking star, she has published several cookbooks and is about to get her own television show. She has a beautiful home, a loving husband and millions of fans on the verge of mega-stardom. And then she gets hacked.[Read more]

Sunshine Mackenzie is living her best life – a hugely popular YouTube cooking star, she has published several cookbooks and is about to get her own television show. She has a beautiful home, a loving husband and millions of fans on the verge of mega-stardom.

And then she gets hacked.

In a single day she loses her reputation, her home, her fortune and her husband when someone hacks into her Twitter account and starts revealing secrets that start showing the cracks in Sunshine’s perfect facade. She and her team scramble to contain the damage but it’s too late, the truth is out there and the media is eager to expose every lie and blemish. Finally, with nowhere else to go, she must return to her hometown and her estranged sister and confront what she has become and where she came from.

Hello, Sunshine by Laura Dave examines living authentic in an inauthentic age. Even us ordinary people present a carefully crafted image of ourselves and our lives through the many social media platforms that are so prevalent now. I know for myself, I only post beautiful photos of my garden or my cat doing something cute, not the pile of dirty dishes in the sink. Does that make our lives any less authentic? Is what we post “real life”, or just a facade? It’s an interesting debate to consider and Hello, Sunshine raises lots of interesting questions. Well worth a read.

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This Beautiful Fantastic http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/this-beautiful-fantastic/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/this-beautiful-fantastic/ Wed, 20 Sep 2017 06:00:47 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe A librarian with a garden – how could I possibly resist? And there’s no need to resist – This Beautiful Fantastic is a charming, modern fairy tale about friendship and trust and finding beauty in the ordinary. Bella Brown is a shy, reclusive librarian (disappointingly, a bit of a stereotype,[Read more]

A librarian with a garden – how could I possibly resist? And there’s no need to resist – This Beautiful Fantastic is a charming, modern fairy tale about friendship and trust and finding beauty in the ordinary.

Bella Brown is a shy, reclusive librarian (disappointingly, a bit of a stereotype, although Bella is young and does not wear her hair in a bun!) whose dream is to become a children’s book author. Lacking the confidence to show her work to anyone, let alone a publisher, she stays hidden in the shadows, avoiding her neighbors and other people, following a careful routine of work and home.

One day her landlord appears and tells her that she will be evicted in 30 days if she does not revive the badly neglected garden at her house (in British-speak, “garden” is what American’s would call a “yard” and in a city is usually quite small with lots of plants and a small grass lawn). Understandably, Bella is upset since she knows nothing about gardening and her first attempts are disastrous. Her grumpy neighbor watches in horror, makes unhelpful, scathing remarks and then, after Bella confronts him, agrees to help her (turns out he’s an expert horticulturist and had turned her in in the first place)

What follows is the blossoming of an epic friendship (yes! I went there! Bad pun!!), the meeting of two opposites that understand loneliness and isolation and tentatively learn to accept the other, blemishes and all and in the process, learn to let other people in as well.

This is a typical British comedy with eccentric characters, dry humor and quirky settings. The library that Bella works at is endlessly fascinating – and weird. I don’t know a lot about public libraries in England, but this library is obsessed with quiet (another stereotype!), is stocked only with very old books and has crazy hours. Also, Bella has apparently memorized the exact location of every single volume!

Bella is played by Jessica Brown Findlay who you might remember as Sybil in Downtown Abbey and the grumpy neighbor is expertly played by Tom Wilkinson; they are joined a cast of familiar British character actors. A delight for all.

 

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The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-woman-in-cabin-10-by-ruth-ware/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-woman-in-cabin-10-by-ruth-ware/ Mon, 18 Sep 2017 06:00:18 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Looking for a new thriller to read, I found The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware. This twisty mystery thriller is a suspenseful haunting read that will leave you wondering whodunit until the very end. Lo Blacklock is a journalist who writes for a travel magazine. Her boss is[Read more]

Looking for a new thriller to read, I found The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware. This twisty mystery thriller is a suspenseful haunting read that will leave you wondering whodunit until the very end.

Lo Blacklock is a journalist who writes for a travel magazine. Her boss is out on maternity leave which means that an assignment of a lifetime is up for grabs. Lo is given the assignment: spend a week on a luxury cruise ship that only has a ten cabins. Sounds perfect, right? After all, the pictures of this exclusive cruise ship are spectacular and Lo could use a bit of a break. She hopes that she will be able to turn this assignment into a better paying position at the magazine and also that if she impresses her boss, she will be given more travel assignments in the future. Right before Lo is to leave, an event happens that shakes and puts her on edge. Instead of passing on this trip though, Lo decides to soldier on.

Once this luxury cruise begins, Lo thinks she may be in over her head. She’s not as polished as the others and the ship practically screams that it costs millions of dollars. The cabins are lush, the guests are important and elegant, and the sea couldn’t be better. It’s a beautiful cruise, but as they begin their voyage, the winds start whipping and it quickly gets cold. Lying in bed one night, Lo wakes up to someone screaming. She then hears a door open and a loud splashing. Rushing to the door, Lo sees what she believes to be a woman thrown overboard. Could this be true? Raising the alarm, she voices her concern to security only to be told that all passengers and crew are accounted for. The cruise continues on as normal. Lo can’t shake the feeling that something is incredibly wrong and she just can’t ignore the worry in her gut. What happened to the woman in cabin 10? Deciding to investigate with the help of a fellow journalist, Lo searches for the woman.

Each passenger has secrets to hide and the ship soon reveals that it is full of secrets as well. Others have to know what happened to the woman. This book was haunting and slightly terrifying as Lo manages twists and turns through this suffocatingly tiny, yet immensely beautiful, cruise ship. Readers will trudge right alongside Lo as she works to find out what happened to the woman in cabin 10. I was hooked all the way to the end.


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Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month 2017! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/15/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-2017/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/15/celebrate-hispanic-heritage-month-2017/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 17:23:14 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Hispanic Heritage Month 2017 begins today, September 15th! To celebrate, we are featuring a unique source of information about the Mexican-American community in the Quad-Cities area: materials from the Iowa Stories 2000 collection (Acc# 2005-02). A little more than ten … Continue reading

Hispanic Heritage Month 2017 begins today, September 15th! To celebrate, we are featuring a unique source of information about the Mexican-American community in the Quad-Cities area: materials from the Iowa Stories 2000 collection (Acc# 2005-02).

A little more than ten years ago, during 2006 and 2007, students from the intermediate schools in the Davenport Community School District conducted interviews with twenty local individuals of Mexican descent. These videorecordings have been transferred to DVDs (thanks to the Putnam Museum) and are now available for viewing at the RSSC Center. We are currently working to describe the contents of each interview and hope to provide online access to the recordings themselves in the near future.

Also in the Iowa Stories 2000 collection are items from the display boards the students created about each of their interview subjects. These are just a few examples:

Al Sierra grew up in the Mexican-American neighborhood of Cook’s Point in Davenport.

From Rita (Quijas) Navarro we learn of St. Alphonsus Catholic Church’s importance to the Mexican-American community in Davenport.

St. Mary’s Church in Davenport was influential in the life of Maggie Ortega, a more recent immigrant from Mexico.

Henry Vargas, born in Cook’s Point, was the first president of the League of United Latin American Citizens in Iowa and worked for the equal treatment of Hispanic-Americans as a member of the St. Ambrose University-based Catholic Interracial Council and the Davenport Human Relations Commission.

The Iowa Stories 2000 collection also includes interviews with Irish Americans, German Americans and African Americans in the area.

Explore your own ethnic heritage with these and the many other resources available for family local history research at the RSSC Center of the Davenport Public Library!

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Learn to Talk Like a Pirate by Sept 19 With the Help of Mango Languages http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/learn-to-talk-like-a-pirate-by-sept-19-with-the-help-of-mango-languages/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/learn-to-talk-like-a-pirate-by-sept-19-with-the-help-of-mango-languages/ Fri, 15 Sep 2017 06:00:04 -0500 Brenda at Info Cafe September 19 is International Talk Like a Pirate Day.  According to Chase’s Calendar of Events, it is “a day when people everywhere can swash their buckles and add a touch of larceny to their dialogue by talking like pirates: for example, ‘Arr, matey, it be a fine day.’  While it’s[Read more]

September 19 is International Talk Like a Pirate Day.  According to Chase’s Calendar of Events, it is “a day when people everywhere can swash their buckles and add a touch of larceny to their dialogue by talking like pirates: for example, ‘Arr, matey, it be a fine day.’  While it’s inherently a guy thing, women have been known to enjoy the day because they have to be addressed as ‘me beauty.’ Celebrated by millions on all seven continents.”

You can learn more about how two average guys started this holiday on June 6, 1995 on a racquetball court in a YMCA in Albany, Oregon here. It didn’t gain a lot of attention until humor columnist Dave Barry wrote about it in a 2002 article. The rest, as they say, is hist -arrrr-y.

Mango Languages, one of the language learning databases to which the Davenport Public Library subscribes, will be offering lessons on how to talk pirate through Sept 19. To access Mango languages, click here. Or, you can go to www.davenportlibrary.com, click on Research Tools, then Online Resources and scroll down until you get to Mango Languages. You’ll need to create a profile using your library card number. Once you’re in, find the search box (it has a magnifying glass icon next to it) and type “Pirate.” You’ll be taken to a page with options such as:

  • Call Someone Names
  • Express Surprise
  • Give Sailing Commands
  • Greet a Friend or Superior
  • Pay a Compliment
  • Invert the Simple Sentence Structure
  • Understand the Usage of Be
  • Use the 2nd Person Pronoun Ye
  • Use Me as a Possessive

Alas, have a fine day, mateys!

 

 

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The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-seven-husbands-of-evelyn-hugo-by-taylor-jenkins-reid/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-seven-husbands-of-evelyn-hugo-by-taylor-jenkins-reid/ Wed, 13 Sep 2017 06:00:52 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe The lives of classic movie actresses and actors have always piqued my interest. How they lived their lives, their scandalous affairs(if they actually had any), and what they did to become an icon are just a few of the things that I always want to know. Media coverage of both[Read more]

The lives of classic movie actresses and actors have always piqued my interest. How they lived their lives, their scandalous affairs(if they actually had any), and what they did to become an icon are just a few of the things that I always want to know. Media coverage of both classic film stars and modern film stars seldom reveal the whole truth and as a result, fans usually have to wait until after the star’s death to learn the full truth, if that. Shelving a cart of new books one day, I stumbled upon The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid. The cover immediately captured my interest as the woman looked like she could have been a classic movie star. Reading the blurb proved that she was and I knew I needed to read this book.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid is the gripping tale of Evelyn Hugo, an adored movie icon. Evelyn’s story is heart-wrenching and pure psychological romance fiction as readers are drawn into Evelyn’s stunningly glamorous world. With her popularity blossoming in the 1950s when she made her way to Los Angeles, Evelyn dominated the Hollywood scene in her relentless and ruthless rise to the top of the movie industry. Evelyn always knew what she wanted and was not afraid to use her body or the people around her to get it. Living in the public eye was a price she paid for being famous, but Evelyn still managed to keep secrets from the public and some of her closest friends that they never would have guessed.

After her decision to leave the Hollywood and show business in general in the late 80s, Evelyn became a recluse. She was never seen out, declined to sit down for interviews, and pictures of an aging Evelyn were almost non-existent. When she reaches out and contacts an unknown magazine reporter named Monique Grant to interview her, everyone in the journalism community is shocked. Why would Evelyn choose Monique to reveal her scandalous and glamorous life? What makes her so special? Why is Evelyn choosing to do this now? Monique has her own issues. She’s not exactly the number one journalist in the world, let alone her city or even her area of expertise. She’s not even 100% happy with where she is working as her career has stalled. Monique’s personal life is just as messy. Her husband left her just five weeks prior and Monique is still reeling.

Recognizing the Evelyn Hugo interview as the potential major career boost that she desperately needs, Monique decides she will do whatever it takes to make this a success and sits down with Evelyn. It becomes clear right off the bat that Evelyn has ulterior motives and it’s left to Monique to figure those out. Quickly Monique becomes wrapped up in the story of Evelyn’s life from her entrance to Los Angeles in the 1950s and the seven husbands she had before she retired in the late 80s. As Evelyn weaves her life’s story for Monique, she discovers that Evelyn’s ruthless ambition led her to some slightly questionable, but nevertheless sustaining, friendships and a major forbidden love that had the ability to potentially ruin Evelyn’s career. Evelyn’s professional and personal lives are forever linked together. As Monique formulates Evelyn’s story, she realizes Evelyn never does anything without having a reason. Monique begins worrying why Evelyn chose her to write her story and when Evelyn’s story finally reaches the present, Monique realizes that she and Evelyn are connected in a truly tragic and life-changing way.

I enjoyed this book more than I thought that I would. Multiple storylines were at play throughout the novel and I found myself thoroughly engrossed in each one. The vivid descriptions of Evelyn’s life as she navigated the rocky waters of fame and her personal life were so well depicted that I found myself believing for a bit that she was a real person. I wanted to learn even more about Evelyn Hugo and her seven husbands. She is fascinating. Highly recommended.

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The Stars are Fire by Anita Shreve http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-stars-are-fire-by-anita-shreve/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-stars-are-fire-by-anita-shreve/ Mon, 11 Sep 2017 06:00:57 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Have you ever looked at the cover of a book and knew that the story was going to hook you? That’s how I felt when I saw The Stars are Fire by Anita Shreve. Swirling fire, a deep red cover, and a bold font all signaled to me that the[Read more]

Have you ever looked at the cover of a book and knew that the story was going to hook you? That’s how I felt when I saw The Stars are Fire by Anita Shreve. Swirling fire, a deep red cover, and a bold font all signaled to me that the content of this book was going to leave me wanting more. Shreve exceeded my expectations with this novel.

The Stars are Fire is a piece of historical domestic fiction that focuses around the Great Maine Fire of 1947. This real event is given a fictionalized twist as Shreve tells the story of Grace Holland’s attempts to survive and rebuild after her life falls into ruins around her. After a summer-long drought, fires began near Bar Harbor and started ravaging the coast of Maine. People were left wondering where to escape to and hoping that the closeness of the sea would spare them from the brunt of the fire.

Grace Holland lives with her husband Gene and their two small toddlers. Five months pregnant, Grace is left to protect her children on her own after Gene leaves her to go help fight the fires. Grace and her best friend, Rosie, race to the sea with their four children to try to survive the flames. Keeping their children alive is their only priority as Grace and Rosie watch in abject horror as their houses and the community that they have grown to love bursts into flames. Hunkered down in the sand by the ocean, Grace fights to keep her children alive, sacrificing her own body to do so.

In the morning, Grace finds herself and her children wonderfully alive, but their lives have irrevocably changed. They’re penniless, homeless, and without a father or husband. Gene never returned from fighting the fires and no one knows where he is. Facing an uncertain future, Grace is forced to rely on the kindness of strangers until she either finds Gene or her mother or gets a job to support herself. Grace has to make a new life for herself and her children, something that both frightens and excites her since her life with Gene was not the most loving or supportive. While she has suffered great losses, Grace is able to move forward, find new happiness, and discover all the things she was missing when she was living with Gene. Just when she is settled into a new normal, something out of the blue happens and Grace is forced to be braver than she ever was before.

I really enjoyed this book. It was the first Anita Shreve book that I read and the first book in a really long time that had me wishing it would have been longer. There were so many characters whose backstories I was yearning to know more of and the ending had me on the edge of my seat wondering what would happen. This book is set up so well that Shreve could easily spin it into a series. Here’s to hoping she does!


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Back to School: A Letter from Immaculate Conception Academy, 1873 – Part II http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/09/back-to-school-a-letter-from-immaculate-conception-academy-1873-part-ii/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/09/back-to-school-a-letter-from-immaculate-conception-academy-1873-part-ii/ Sat, 09 Sep 2017 17:31:36 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections This week we continue with our “back-to-school” theme, learning about the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center resources that help us place Immaculate Conception Academy student Ada Sala’s 1873 letter to her father, E.M. Sala, in historical context. Imma Conception, Davenport, Iowa, … Continue reading

This week we continue with our “back-to-school” theme, learning about the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center resources that help us place Immaculate Conception Academy student Ada Sala’s 1873 letter to her father, E.M. Sala, in historical context.



Imma Conception, Davenport, Iowa, Mar. 5, 1873

Dear Pa,

I received your kind letter and was so glad to hear from you, as it was the first letter I had from you since you were here.

We were examined last week, and I will get a certificate in all of my studies; when we receive our certificates I will send you mine, for I know you will be glad to see one.

Lizzie Blacksmith is coming to live with Mary, because she is not able to do her own work. I think I will write to her this week. Please excuse the shortness of this letter, as I have nothing more of interest. I will conclude with fondest love to all.

Your loving child,

Ada Sala


We are fortunate to have a photocopy of the registration records for Immaculate Conception Academy from 1867-1887 in our collection. Here we find Ada Sala listed among the 24 girls enrolling in September of 1872. The records indicate she is from Rock Island, Illinois. This suggests that Ada’s home base at that time was with her older sister Mary, whom we had previously found to be living in that city then (recently married in 1871 to Henry Boggess, pregnant with her first child Vinnie, and attended by her peer Lizzie Blacksmith from the Salas’ former residence in Lee County, Iowa) thanks to census and family tree information obtained via the Ancestry Library Edition database.

When Ada thanks her father E.M. Sala for writing, saying  “…it was the first letter I had from you since you were here,” we may imagine that “here” was with his other daughter and son-in-law in Rock Island. It is not likely that Ada lived with her sister’s family and traveled back and forth daily to the Academy, since she says “I think I will write to her this week” in reference to Mary. This and the fact that she writes using Academy stationery suggest Ada was one of the 61 “pupils in Boarding School” for the 1872-1873 year.

The registration records (the running title in the ledger is actually “Attendance during Academic Year 1872-73) show that the city of Davenport supplied the majority of the 97 “pupils in in Day School.” Ada’s fellow boarders were girls from LeClaire, Clinton, DeWitt, Iowa City, Wilton, Washington, Bellevue, and McGregor in Iowa; Rock Island, Moline, Geneseo, Prophetstown, Chicago, and several illegible places in Illinois, as well as Mississippi River towns in Wisconsin and Missouri.

Two publications available at the RSSCC, History of the Immaculate Conception Academy of Davenport Iowa…by Sister Mary St. Joan of Arc Coogan, B.V.M. (SC 371.0712 MAR) and Immaculate Conception Academy 1859-1958 (SC377.82 Imm), provide insight into the life of boarding school students like Ada Sala during the 1870’s.

The “Hill House”at Main and 8th Streets in Davenport was occupied by the members of the order that ran the Academy, the Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary. It is unclear if the boarding school students also lived in the Hill House, but we do know that their classes were held in the “large frame building” just to the north along Main Street. To get there, they “ascended an outside stairway” so as to remain “religiously segregated” from the day students on the first floor (History, 75).

A.T. Andreas’ Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa. Chicago: Andreas Atlas Co., 1875.

Ada likely received the certificates she mentions in music, drawing, painting, and needlework, as those subjects were available both in the 1860’s and and in the year 1875. The account book kept by Sister Mary Gonzaga McClosky suggests that the study of geography and natural science was also also possible: $20.00 was spent on maps and $199.65 on “Philosophical Apparatus” in 1873 (History, 77).  According to the author of  Immaculate Conception Academy:

“Students of the [18]‘70’s had their grades published in the [student newspaper] Portfolio. A twofold mark was registered: one for ‘excellence of deportment, amiability and politeness’ and another for examination averages (15)”

Students were also required to participate in daily “calisthenic exercise” for which the nuns sewed special “calisthenic suits” (History, 72). Otherwise, Ada and her peers would have worn “high-necked, long-sleeved, ankle-length black dresses” as a uniform (Immaculate, 20).

Ada Sala did not go back to school. Her name does not appear in the registration records after 1873, and in the 1880 Census we find her back in Grant County, Wisconsin, living with her father, his new wife Phoebe, and her younger siblings.

(posted by Katie)

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Deadline by Sandra Brown http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/deadline-by-sandra-brown/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/deadline-by-sandra-brown/ Thu, 07 Sep 2017 06:00:30 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe I love romance books. They are the perfect stress-free read. When I’m feeling anxious or need a break, I tend to gravitate toward the romance section in the library for a new(to me) romance read. I can usually fly through a romance novel in a day or two and get[Read more]

I love romance books. They are the perfect stress-free read. When I’m feeling anxious or need a break, I tend to gravitate toward the romance section in the library for a new(to me) romance read. I can usually fly through a romance novel in a day or two and get back to my other reading. I needed a good romance read recently and decided to look for one online. I checked out a copy of Deadline by Sandra Brown a week ago through OverDrive. I had just finished another book, saw Deadline, thought the cover looked interesting AND saw it was available immediately for checkout, so I decided to give it a listen. I had never read anything from Sandra Brown before, so I was expecting a regular suspenseful fiction read. Boy, was I wrong.

Deadline by Sandra Brown is a fantastically crafted piece of romantic suspense fiction that deals with family secrets, post-traumatic stress disorder, presumed deaths, missing persons, domestic terrorists, and a massive hunt for the truth. Dawson Scott is a journalist who has traveled the world writing stories. He just returned from Afghanistan after spending almost a year in combat conditions. Dawson is trying to cope with battle fatigue, but finds alcohol and drugs to be his only solace. He’s haunted by what he witnessed overseas and simply trying to get through his life one hour at a time. After being told by his boss that he is to fly somewhere less than desirable to cover a story, Dawson receives a phone call from his source within the FBI that has the power to completely change his life.

Amelia Nolan is struggling to get over the death of her ex-husband, former Marine Jeremy Wesson. Jeremy disappeared and was later presumed to have been murdered after the mutilated body of his married girlfriend was found eaten by dogs. Jeremy’s DNA was found on scene and authorities have presumed him dead. The woman’s husband is on trial for his murder and Amelia has been called to testify. Tackling this case while raising two very young children as a single parent, Amelia is working hard to keep her life together. With her nanny in tow, Amelia and the boys spend time on the beach, their safe haven from the craziness around the trial.

Dawson’s source has called to say that the DNA found at the Wesson crime scene has found a match. Jeremy is actually the biological son of a pair of domestic terrorists who have been on the FBI’s most wanted list for over 40 years. Pleading with Dawson, his source convinces him to cover the trial of Jeremy’s presumed murderer to try to find out more information about Jeremy’s life. Walking into the courtroom, Dawson plans on staying for a few days, writing his story, and moving on. The minute he sets eyes on Amelia though, his plan goes out the window. In an effort to learn more about Jeremy, Dawson decides to get closer to Amelia and soon finds himself developing feelings for her. Dawson has to stay focused, figure out who Jeremy Wesson really is, and if he is still in contact with his domestic terrorist parents. Could he catch them? Just how much danger are Amelia and her boys in?

This book is definitely a thriller with a bit of romance. Brown has crafted a book that is very suspenseful, but has some definite steamy scenes. This book is well-crafted with a plot that is quite twisty and chockful of red herrings. I was engrossed through this book as Dawson and Amelia worked to find out the truth. Highly recommend. I can’t wait to read more Sandra Brown!


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Meet Maria Nhambu http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/meet-maria-nhambu/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/meet-maria-nhambu/ Wed, 06 Sep 2017 06:00:53 -0500 Brenda at Info Cafe Last fall I wrote about Maria Nhambu’s memoir, Africa’s Child. You can read my blog about it here. It tells the story of how she grew up as an orphaned, mixed-race child in Tanzania. The first book in the Dancing Soul Trilogy, Africa’s Child is as heartbreaking as it is inspiring. It leaves[Read more]

Last fall I wrote about Maria Nhambu’s memoir, Africa’s Child. You can read my blog about it here. It tells the story of how she grew up as an orphaned, mixed-race child in Tanzania. The first book in the Dancing Soul Trilogy, Africa’s Child is as heartbreaking as it is inspiring. It leaves you wondering where she went from there.

I am thrilled to share that the second book, called America’s Daughter, has been published. In it, Nhambu chronicles what it was like for her leaving Africa. She was eighteen years old with a newly-adoptive mother who was barely four years older than her. She found a vastly different culture in America and began building a new life in it.

Laugh and cry with her as she recalls the many differences between Tanzania and Minnesota. She reveres education as her key to escaping a life of poverty and oppression. It is no surprise that she chose a career as an educator (at one point, she taught a soon-to-be famous musician named Prince Rogers Nelson.) Nhambu has a love for music, especially African music. She went on to create a program called Aerobics With Soul. It incorporates African dance into a fitness workout.

Nhambu still spends summers in Minnesota, but lives in Delray Beach, Florida during the winter. Thanks to family ties she has to the Quad Cities, she will be visiting us at Eastern on Saturday, Sept 9 at 10:30am to share her story with us in person. Joining her will be her adoptive mother and sister. Refreshments and copies of her books will be available. If we are lucky, there will be dancing. 😉

Nhambu is a gifted storyteller whose candor has made me cry, then cheer for her. Come meet a fascinating woman whose indomitable spirit has proven that love truly does conquer all.

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The Breakdown by B.A. Paris http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-breakdown-by-b-a-paris/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-breakdown-by-b-a-paris/ Tue, 05 Sep 2017 06:00:12 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe When I was working on my ordering, I stumbled upon the name: B. A. Paris. For some reason, I thought she was a well established author already and decided to give her newest book a try. Later when I began listening to said book, I looked her up on Fantastic[Read more]

When I was working on my ordering, I stumbled upon the name: B. A. Paris. For some reason, I thought she was a well established author already and decided to give her newest book a try. Later when I began listening to said book, I looked her up on Fantastic Fiction, one of my favorite author websites. Low and behold, Paris was not an established author! Her first book, Behind Closed Doors, had only been released in 2016. I’m glad that I decided to pick up her newest book, The Breakdown, on a whim and give it a listen. Try it. You won’t be disappointed.

The Breakdown is Paris’ second novel. In this thrilling piece of suspense fiction, Paris searches for the truth around a murder investigation. Cass is a school teacher on her way home from work, itching to begin her much needed summer break. A major storm has hit her area making her drive home more treacherous than it usually is. There’s a shortcut between her school and her house that she usually takes, much to her husband’s chagrin. Calling him before she leaves, her husband tells her not to take the shortcut because even on a clear weather day, that isolated wooded road is difficult to drive on. Taking a major road on the way home, Cass is almost run off the road and makes the split-second decision to take the short-cut home.

Almost home, Cass sees a stalled vehicle pulled over on the side of the road. She stops to help, but the weather picks up and Cass decides to leave and call the authorities when she gets home to alert them of the stalled vehicle. The next morning, the news reveals that the stranded driver had been brutally murdered the night before. Cass is immediately thrown into great turmoil. When she drove by, the driver was still alive and according to the timeline released by the authorities, was killed most likely right after Cass left for home. Did she see who did it? Was the murderer in the car? If Cass would have exited her car to help the driver, would the driver have been saved or would Cass have been murdered as well? Should she call the police and let them know she saw the driver? What should she do? These questions and so much more race through Cass’s mind all day and night. Her life becomes consumed by guilt and the nagging thought that she failed and could have saved the driver.

Add in the fact that Cass’s memories are starting to fade, Cass begins to immediately doubt herself.  Her mother suffered from dementia and Cass is worried that she has it as well. Cass’s worries about her health and her massive guilt over not stopping to help the stranded driver exacerbate her confusion. She starts to forget way more things than usual. Cass mixes up dates, forgets purchasing things, and becomes increasingly paranoid. Her worry over the driver ratchets up several notches when she starts receiving silent phone calls that she is convinced are from the murderer. Her husband and best friend are very supportive, however, and Cass finds herself relying on them more than usual to get through this turmoil. If only the two got along better, then Cass’s life would be even easier. Nevertheless, she knows that they will stick by her and support her as she works through her issues.

This book was riveting and had all the necessary crazy, psychological twists that I love in suspense thrillers. Each character is very well-developed and fits neatly into this intensely twisty, clever, and engrossing plot. I was definitely caught off guard when the twist happened, so much so that when I finished this book, I immediately put B.A. Paris’ other novel on hold!


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Back to School: A Letter From Immaculate Conception Academy, 1873 – Part I http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/01/back-to-school-a-letter-from-immaculate-conception-academy-1873-part-i/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/09/01/back-to-school-a-letter-from-immaculate-conception-academy-1873-part-i/ Fri, 01 Sep 2017 11:33:59 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections At this time of year, as many students return to school, we thought it appropriate to share one of the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s latest acquisitions: a March, 1873 letter from a student at the Immaculate Conception Academy in Davenport … Continue reading

At this time of year, as many students return to school, we thought it appropriate to share one of the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s latest acquisitions: a March, 1873 letter from a student at the Immaculate Conception Academy in Davenport to her father, E.M. Sala, in West Point, Iowa.



Imma Conception, Davenport, Iowa, Mar. 5, 1873

Dear Pa,

I received your kind letter and was so glad to hear from you, as it was the first letter I had from you since you were here.

We were examined last week, and I will get a certificate in all of my studies; when we receive our certificates I will send you mine, for I know you will be glad to see one.

Lizzie Blacksmith is coming to live with Mary, because she is not able to do her own work. I think I will write to her this week. Please excuse the shortness of this letter, as I have nothing more of interest. I will conclude with fondest love to all.

Your loving child,

Ada Sala


This letter raises some interesting questions about both the relationships among Sala family members and the experience of a student at the Immaculate Conception Academy in the early 1870’s. In seeking answers, we may demonstrate the use of some of the resources available here in the Special Collections department of the library. This week, we uncover some information about the family; next week, in Part II, we will discuss the Academy. Grab a pencil and paper — it’s time to be “schooled” in family and local history research!

Ada Sala is about 15 years old when she writes this letter to her father in 1873. We know this because we have searched her name in the Ancestry Library Edition database (available to patrons at all three Davenport library locations) and found her listed in the US Federal Census records for 1860 at age 2 and in 1870 at age 12. Therefore, she was likely born in the year 1858.

The census data for these years gives us further information about her father: his first name was Eli,  he was a physician by profession, and about 57 years old when he received Ada’s letter. We also learn that both he and his wife Susan were born on the Pennsylvania/Ohio border; the family included four boys and three girls; in 1860, they resided in West Point, Iowa, and by 1870 they had moved to Patch Grove, Wisconsin.

A.T. Andreas’ Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa. Chicago: Andreas Atlas Co., 1875.

Historical Atlas of Wisconsin…Milwaukee: Snyder, Van Vechten & Co., 1878.

Wondering why Ada’s letter was addressed to only one parent, we searched Ancestry for “Susan Sala” to find that she had died on February 18, 1872, about a year earlier. This piece of information comes from the images of Grant County, Wisconsin (the location of Patch Grove) probate records made available on the database.

Information from Ancestry has also helped us to determine that the “Mary” Ada refers to in the letter as being “not able to do her own work,” was likely her older sister, then struggling with her first pregnancy. Marriage records from Grant County, Wisconsin show that Mary Sala married a Henry Boggess in Patch Grove in 1871. The 1880 US Federal Census shows Henry Boggess living in Rock Island, Illinois with his wife Mary and 6-year-old daughter Vinnie. A family tree created by an Ancestry user (another feature of the database) gives Vinnie’s date of birth as August of 1873 in Rock Island, five months after Ada’s mention of Mary’s difficulties.

Library of Congress Map Division

Was the “Lizzie Blacksmith” who Ada said was “coming to live with Mary” the Elizabeth Black Smitte from a German immigrant family living in Franklin (1870 US Census), the town adjacent to West Point in Lee County, Iowa who later married Joseph Greenwood (on September 7, 1873, according to county marriage records) in Rock Island, Illinois? Perhaps Lizzie and Mary had been friends from when the Salas lived in West Point, or Lizzie was otherwise known to the family (as a servant?) through Ada and Mary’s older brothers still living there? Again, with the many types of records it provides, the Ancestry database allows us to suggest these possible relationships.

A.T. Andreas’ Illustrated Historical Atlas of the State of Iowa. Chicago: Andreas Atlas Co., 1875.

We continue our lesson next week with a closer look at the Immaculate Conception Academy at the time when Ada Sala wrote her letter. Until then, please complete this homework assignment: visit the library and explore your own family history with Ancestry Library Edition!

(posted by Katie)

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Total Eclipse of the Sun: August 7, 1869 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/18/total-eclipse-of-the-sun-august-7-1869/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/18/total-eclipse-of-the-sun-august-7-1869/ Fri, 18 Aug 2017 17:25:19 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections As we prepare for the upcoming solar eclipse, we thought we would take a look back at the Solar Eclipse of 1869 as viewed by Davenporters. The last solar eclipse of the 19th century occurred on Saturday, August 7th, 1869. … Continue reading

As we prepare for the upcoming solar eclipse, we thought we would take a look back at the Solar Eclipse of 1869 as viewed by Davenporters.

The last solar eclipse of the 19th century occurred on Saturday, August 7th, 1869. It was a clear, lovely day here in Davenport. The central line of the eclipse bisected Iowa, entering 18 miles south of the NW corner of the state and leaving it 2 miles north of the east extension of its southern boundary in Lee County. The belt of the country totally eclipsed was 158 1/2 miles wide at the NW corner of the state and 156 miles wide at the SE corner. The central line was near halfway between the northern and southern limits of the eclipse. The area covered by the belt of the total eclipse was 44,000 miles. Des Moines & Burlington were chosen by astronomers for observation, being at the center of belt totality.

In Davenport, special glasses made with smoked glass were sold for 5 to 10 cents each, according to size and perfection of coloring. Telescopic views of the eclipse were held at Dr. Hazen’s office over Harrison and Stark’s drug store. Admission cost 50 cents and as many people as could get in were admitted. The reflection of the eclipse was captured through a telescope and projected on a screen, and its several stages were accurately represented to a room full of spectators. 

Observations in Davenport were sponsored by the Davenport Academy of Sciences, under the direction of Professor Thomas Lighton/Leighton of Rock Island.  An observatory was established on the roof of the Davenport National Bank building. P. B. Jones’ Photograph Gallery

One telescopic camera was used by Paul B. Jones (magnifying power of 30 diameters) for taking photographs; the was other was used by Prof. Lighton (magnifying power of 150 diameters) for observation. The lenses were arranged so images could vary from 4 to 16 inches; negatives could be made in any size in-between. 

The cameras were mounted on a stand that could incline in any direction. This allowed observers to follow the sun without causing any jarring or shaking. The strong wood frame was mounted on Equatorial plates firmly fixed and edged with 630 teeth and a steel screw, which caused the upper plate to move freely. On top of the plates were two sweeps supported on two columns in which the telescopes were placed so that the equator could be followed in a single motion.

Every three minutes, Jones took an image on a 4-inch glass plate negative and immediately developed it. This resulted in 24 impressive photographs:

The eclipse began at 3:57:53pm, as the moon approached the sun from the Northeast quadrant. Spectators noticed an instant change in the atmosphere. Swallows and doves flew back and forth as a result of the unexpected darkness. The strange light caused a change in hue of forest on the island and trees to a darker green, then vapory yellow, then “so deep that shades were lost across the tops and the woods were of the deepest shade of green.”

At 4:20pm, half the sun was obscured. The landscape looked as it does in dim twilight. Swallows and pigeons disappeared. You could not see the people standing on rooftops. As the sun was reduced to a crescent, the crowd “observed protuberances on its shining surface and a shimmer on the disc of the moon itself in 2 or 3 places”.

The Davenport Gazette attempted to describe the totality:

“Darkness” was not darkness. The strange light produced was about of the degree of darkness prevalent at the interval between setting of the sun and appearing of the moon when that orb is in full. Yet it was far different, too: softer in effect upon senses, pervading landscape, and filling the atmosphere with a wonderfully delicate influence of grayish rosiness. 

In the Heavens, it was the light of earliest day when stars are going out. On Earth is was a light denser than that of the full moon, but less dark than that of moonless starlight – a combination of the two, with a sublimity, awful in character, that is never observed in either. 

Stars burst suddenly into view the instant the sun was hidden. Mercury […] came prominently into view right near the sun. Venus shone as one may see her whenever she is the evening star and Regulus, too came like the great star he is, a shining light in the heavens. 

And also the corona: 

The moon looked as if it were hung in the Heavens in bold relief, detached from all governing power. At its round edges there was the faintest tint of something that looked like struggling light. But all around it there was light. Now the corona was shaped like a many-cornered star; then it was round with almost even edges- but so beautiful in contrast with the black disc it glorified. There was a pinkish hue visible in it for a second, then a rainbowish appearance just one instant, and then it glowed in changes of hue. There was a superior brightness on one side at one instant, and then its glory was uniformly shaded, in a brief second to be radially striated.

The corona lasted just 63 seconds, starting at 4:57:27pm.

“There were loud cheers from spectators, some who saw Bailey’s Beads distinctly and a shooting of red light from the moon. 

The wildlife took notice of the unexpected change in light. Birds disappeared. Bats and night hawks came out. Flies nested on ceilings. Farmers reported that the sheep sought repose.

Before totality, not a cloud was visible anywhere. During the corona, multi-colored clouds illuminated the western half of the Horizon. They lay in streaks and were pink, light purple, and gray at first but soon exhibited about all the colors of the rainbow, though of light shade. 

The thermometer in the shade varied by 5 degrees, falling from 70 degrees to 65 degrees. The barometer was stationary during the whole of the phenomena, remaining at 29.62-100 from 4pm on Saturday until 8am on Sunday. There was no variation of magnetic current.”

The immersion of the moon occurred at 4:58:31pm.

“Instantly, all the Earth changed. The stars disappeared, and the hues of day were shed upon every object. The change was more sublime than the darkening. Birds came out and sang a welcome to daylight, trees assumed a natural hue. The moon seemed glad to get away and hurried off the disc of the sun more rapidly than she ventured to travel across it.”

The eclipse was over at 5:57:27pm.

In the weeks after the eclipse a “wild boy” was spotted a number of times in East Davenport, in the back of Judge Grant’s farm near Bettendorf. A hunter who spotted it described it as having “light sandy hair covering its naked body,” a “revoltingly ugly” face and “brutal appearance.” Could he had been suffering from the effects of the eclipse?

(posted by Cristina)

Sources:

“The Solar Eclipse: it’s Importance to Science.” Daily Gazette, 07 Aug 1869, p. 4.

“The Solar Eclipse: Observations of the Phenomenon in Davenport,” Daily Gazette, 09 Aug 1869, p. 4.

“A New Peter The Wild Boy,”Daily Davenport Democrat, 24 Aug 1869 p. 1.

Photographs of the Eclipse of the Sun, August 7, 1869 Taken by the Academy of Natural Sciences, Davenport, Iowa. Griggs, Watson & Day, Printers, 1869

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Celebrating 50 years: 2018 Calendar by the Davenport Public Library http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/12/celebrating-50-years-2018-calendar-by-the-davenport-public-library/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/12/celebrating-50-years-2018-calendar-by-the-davenport-public-library/ Sat, 12 Aug 2017 09:36:34 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We are proud to announce a very special project from the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center! A 2018 calendar featuring photographs of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa from our collection is now on sale at all three of the Davenport Public … Continue reading

We are proud to announce a very special project from the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center!

A 2018 calendar featuring photographs of Davenport and Scott County, Iowa from our collection is now on sale at all three of the Davenport Public Library locations. 

Front Cover of the Davenport Public Library’s Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center 2018 Calendar.

What inspired this endeavor? Next year is the 50th anniversary of our Main Street building, designed by world-renowned architect Edward Durell Stone.* It is also the Davenport Public Library location that houses the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center.

Narrowing down which photographs to place in the calendar was a daunting task…so many excellent ones to choose from in our collection! In addition to photographs, the calendar includes important dates in the history of the local area, such as this one: On June 29, 1863, the First National Bank opened at 201 W. 2nd Street in Davenport, the first bank in the nation to open under the National Banking and Currency Act (passed by the United States Congress that same year)!

Back cover of the Davenport Public Library’s Richardson-Sloane Special Collection Center 2018 calendar.

Calendars are $10 each, with proceeds going to the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center in support of the library’s local history and genealogy collections.

It is a wall calendar design with a hole at the top to allow for hanging. Folded, it is 8 1/2 x 11 inches; open, it is 11 x 17 inches. The photos are in black and white.

We also created a virtual tour of the locations in the photographs on HistoryPin!

If you have any questions, please contact The RSSC Center of the Davenport Public Library at (563) 326-7902 or specialcollections@davenportlibrary.com.

*Some of the landmark projects by Mr. Stone include his work as principal designer of the Radio City Music Hall (New York City, NY. 1932). With Philip Goodwin, the Museum of Modern Art (New York City, NY. 1937). Later independent works include the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (Washington, D.C. 1962) and the United States Embassy in New Delhi (India. 1954).

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Build a Better Davenport: The Priester Construction Company http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/01/build-a-better-davenport-the-priester-construction-company/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/08/01/build-a-better-davenport-the-priester-construction-company/ Tue, 01 Aug 2017 11:42:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We conclude the Davenport Public Library’s summer reading theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers. Our final installment: The Priester Construction Company. … Continue reading

We conclude the Davenport Public Library’s summer reading theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers. Our final installment: The Priester Construction Company.
1919 was a big year for two Davenport brothers – Walter and Oscar Priester. World War I was over, and the recent civil engineering graduates of Cornell University were ready to invest in their futures and their community. With a financial assist from a cousin, the brothers opened a general contracting firm, Priester Construction Company. They worked with some of the best and brightest architects, landing the honor of being featured in the publication Architecture and Design in November, 1940.

 

 

They proudly boasted successfully completing over 200 contracts for companies from Davenport to New York City in that short twenty year span!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The men raised their families, serving prominently in Davenport’s civic affairs until they passed, Walter in 1965 and Oscar in 1966. By then, sons Walter K., Thomas W. and Dudley had assumed operation of the company. This generation successfully guided construction of the Davenport Public Library on Main Street, Modern Woodman of America headquarters, WOC (now KWQC) building, Assumption High School and their own office building at 601 Brady Street in 1966 – recently added to the National Register of Historic Places for its Mid-Century Modern style architecture.

The company was doing $25 million a year in construction with 150 employees until the 1980’s economic decline. They gambled on building Paul Revere Square, a $7.5 million office-shopping center at Kimberly and Jersey Ridge roads that offered spaces for lease or sale. The company figured they would be ready with this brand new building once the economy improved. Unfortunately, economic recovery took longer than expected and in 1990 the lender foreclosed on the construction loan. The company found themselves in a difficult position.

In 1993 Priester Construction Company reorganized, joined by new partner Dicon Inc. For nearly a century now, this Davenport company has been engaged in scores of major construction projects in the Quad-Cities and beyond. The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is proud to be the repository for many of the Company’s project drawings, blueprints, etc. These items have proved invaluable as interest in renovating some of these buildings has increased. We are forever grateful for the call from Dudley Priester on that hot July day in 2009 when he said come and get em. And we did!

Sources:
Accession #2009-10 Priester Construction Company
The Story of Iowa-The Progress of an American State Vol. 3 (1952); pages 79-80; by Wm. J. Petersen
Times-Democrat; 20 Apr 1965 p.5; Obituary Walter A. Priester
Times-Democrat; 10 Dec 1966 p.11; Obituary Oscar F. Priester
Quad City Times; 14 Nov 1993 p.17a; “Priester builds new tradition-Q-C construction company reorganizes” by John Willard
Quad City Times; January 2017; online access; Obituary of Dudley Bell Priester
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b2/Priester_Building_-_Davenport%2C_Iowa_03.jpg

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Build a Better Davenport: Improve Second Street! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/07/24/build-a-better-davenport-improve-second-street/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/07/24/build-a-better-davenport-improve-second-street/ Mon, 24 Jul 2017 17:21:18 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers. This week we present … Continue reading

We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers.

This week we present the developers of Davenport’s East 2nd Street commercial properties in early 1930’s: Mr. William Goodwin Renwick and the East Second Street Company.

William G. Renwick was the only surviving child of (Pamela) Helen Goodwin and highly successful lumber businessman William Renwick. He was a “comforting companion to his mother” following his  father’s death in 1896. Mother and son lived together in the house at 901 Tremont Street, the “Renwick Mansion,” through William’s early childhood. His importance as an heir to his father’s fortune is suggested by the fact that his name is listed in the 1894 and 1896 Davenport city directories, when he would have been only 8 and 10 years old, respectively. By 1900 the pair had moved to Claremont, California, where Helen G. Renwick became an notable patron of Pomona College. There, “Wild Bill” completed his undergraduate studies and gained a reputation as a reckless driver of expensive automobiles (his first, purchased in Germany at the end of a round-the-world trip with his mother, was possibly also the first in the city). He married and went on to Harvard Law School; he and his wife Mary Mead afterwards settled in the Boston area. In addition to his occupations as a lawyer and a military man, William became a world-renowned collector of historic firearms and armour. (1)

Although he lived most of his life elsewhere, Renwick remained connected to his hometown of Davenport through his real estate holdings. In May of 1929, he announced plans to re-develop the commercial block on the north side of East 2nd Street between Brady and Perry Streets, property inherited from his father on land that originally been sold to Colonel George Davenport by Antoine LeClaire. He hired the Burnham Brothers of Chicago (designers of the famed Carbide & Carbon building) as architects and negotiated a lease with Sears & Roebuck Company for the long-term rental of the first of two new buildings. (2)

 

 

 

The RSSC Center’s collection of architectural plans includes those drawn up by the Burnham Brothers’ firm for Renwick. The elevation drawing below shows the design for the facade of the building at 114-118 East Second Street, occupied by Sears, Roebuck & Co.:

Wm. G. Renwick Buildings, Davenport Public Library Architectural Drawings Collection, #2007-19.

The “as-built” facade and Renwick’s second building to the west may be seen in these postcard views from the 1930’s and ’40’s:

Davenport Public Library Postcard Collection, #PC 025.

Davenport Public Library Postcard Collection, #PC 021.

One of the first businesses to occupy the second building was Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Company (#108) in 1931.  Meat cases, wrap tables, shelves, a candy counter, a bread table, and other features of a grocery store are located on this plan:

Wm. G. Renwick Buildings, Davenport Public Library Architectural Drawings Collection, #2007-19.

According to the Davenport city directories for 1931 and 1932, Renwick tenants contemporary with the Great A&P included Janet Frocks at #110 and National Chain Store, Inc., a millner’s, at #112.

The south side of 2nd Street was developed by the East Second Street Company (1929-1960), established in September, 1929 by George, Benjamin, and Edward Putnam, trustees of another prominent Davenport family’s estate. The RSSC Center is the fortunate custodian of the Company’s papers (DPL Archives and Manuscript Collection #2012-23).

This photograph of 119-121 2nd Street accompanied a September 1932 letter from Edward K. Putnam to the Kline Brothers’ Company of New York City. In hopes of finding a tenant in the recipient, Putnam asked: “When a retail chain can secure a location where its line exactly fits, which is in the path of of growth and at a reasonable rental, is it not time to grasp the opportunity?”

East Second Street Company Records, Papers, 1929-1960, Davenport Public Library Archives and Manuscripts Collection, #2012-23.

Although they did not succeed in attracting the Kline Co. to Davenport, the Putnams found other commercial renters for the south block, including the Huebotter Furniture Company:

East Second Street Company Records, Papers, 1929-1960, Davenport Public Library Archives and Manuscripts Collection, #2012-23.

These two photographs of East Second Street from our image collections can be found online in the the Upper Mississippi Valley Digital Image Archive, a database created by the Davenport Public Library in partnership with other Quad-Cities area repositories for historical materials. The first shows the Sears building still under construction, the empty lot awaiting Renwick’s second building, and the as-yet undeveloped south side of the street; the second shows both Sears and Huebotter’s up and running, as well as the absence of streetcars.

Davenport Public Library Image Collection, #VM89-001132, v. 155.

Davenport Public Library Image Collection, #VM89-000876, v. 171.

We again draw upon our postcard collection for a glimpse of the commercial life on East Second Street before William G. Renwick and the East Second Street Company began to transform it:

Davenport Public Library Postcard Collection, #PC 010.

Share with us your memories of shopping on East Second Street in the comments!

(posted by Katie)

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(1) A series of articles on Helen Goodwin Renwick by Judy Wright in the Claremont Courier, July, 2002.

(2) Davenport Democrat and Leader, 21 May 1929, pages 1 and 18.

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Build a Better Davenport: The Mueller Lumber Company http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/07/07/build-a-better-davenport-the-mueller-lumber-company/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/07/07/build-a-better-davenport-the-mueller-lumber-company/ Fri, 07 Jul 2017 17:17:08 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers. This week we present … Continue reading

Quad-City Times, 23 July 1971.

We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers.

This week we present the 143-year history of Davenport’s Mueller Lumber Company in timeline format:

March 1850 – Strong Burnell opens the first saw mill in Davenport at Front & Scott Streets.

1852 – Christian Mueller, a Schleswig-Holsteiner and veteran of the Revolution of 1848, arrives in Davenport, Iowa. He begins working at a lumber yard for $1.25 per day, and eventually becomes the supervisor at the French & Davies mill.

1854 – After adding a sash, door,  and blind factory the saw mill is renamed Burnell, Gillet & Co. The production of  lath and shingles begins.

18 May 1863 – Lorenzo Schricker and Louis Dessaint purchase the mill property and the firm becomes known as Schricker & Dessaint.

04 April 1868 – Christian Mueller buys Dessaint’s interest in the firm, then renamed Schricker and Mueller. In these early days, Mueller was manufacturer, wholesaler and retailer of lumber products, wood lath and shingles.

1870 – The steamboat St. Croix is built. Before that, logs floated down Chippewa River on huge rafts navigated by men with large oars.

October 1883 – Mueller purchases the Schricker interest after Lorenzo Schricker’s death in July. Frank and Ed C. Mueller, sons of Christian, join the firm. Another son, William L., joins a few years later.

15 December 1885 – A fire causes $30,000 in damages.

August 1886 – A new mill begins operation with the lumber that survived the 1885 fire.

01 January 1895 – The firm reorganizes. Christian’s sons are taken in as full partners and the name is changed to Christian Mueller and Sons.

January 1897 – The firm acquires land in the Chippewa Falls area of Wisconsin. The LeClaire Navigation Co. begins towing the Mueller log rafts downriver.

1898 – A branch yard opens in Moline, IL. Later, branches are opened in Rock Island, East Moline and Durant.

10 September 1901 – Christian Mueller dies.

25 October 1901 – The saw mill at West River Drive & Scott streets is destroyed by fire. Loss $110,000.

25 January 1902 – The Articles of Incorporation are filed in Scott County for the Mueller Lumber Company.

07 April 1902 – A new saw mill is constructed on Cook’s Point near Credit Island.

1907 – The mill is dismantled when logging in the North Woods ceases. The manufacturing portion of business shut down. The property at West 2nd & Scott streets continues to be used as a storage facility and retail lumber yard.

1916 – Ben C. Mueller enters the family business. Mueller Land and Timber Co. purchases land in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Idaho and Oregon.

06 September 1940 – The firm becomes 1/3 owner of Davenport Homes Inc.  1,000 homes are built during the first 25 years.

23 January 1942 – The firm’s Davenport Garden Homes Corporation begins to build houses during WWII.

27 October 1951 – Two corporations are formed – one operating the retail lumber business and the other holding all of the land, buildings and investments. The charter is amended and the name is changed to “Christian Mueller Realty Co.” A new corporation is formed and named Mueller Lumber Co.

1956 – Robert Horton, husband of one of Christian Mueller’s great-granddaughters, joins the firm.

June 1960 – The roof truss manufacturing business of Bettendorf Distributing Co. is purchased and expanded. The Components Department also begins manufacturing wall panels for houses.

1961 – The Moline Lumber Yard combines with the Swan-Bahnsen Lumber Co. of Moline, forming the new Mueller Bahnsen Corporation, located near the Quad City Airport. The old lumber yard in downtown Moline is closed.

1979 – A large manufacturing plant opens in Mt. Joy.

1986 – The name is changed back to Mueller Lumber Co.

3 November 1988 – The Mueller Lumber Co. is dissolved.

August 1992 – The retail lumber business is sold to the Great Plains Supply Inc., of Minnesota.

Chamber of Commerce News, March 1955. 

 

Some “Then and Now” comparisons of  Mueller Lumber Co. projects with images from our Mueller Lumber Company collection (Acc#1995-01):

Top: 2634 Esplanade Ave. in 1940. Bottom: Milo H. Parizek, 1331 West 36th Street.

Davenport Garden Homes on Pacific Avenue, 27 Oct 1943.

Earl C. Harper, 217 West 30th Street (n.d.)

Color renderings of model homes, complete with plans: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(posted by Cristina)

————————————————————————————————————–

Arpy, Jim. “A Century of Lumber Business With A Davenport Firm,” Times-Democrat, 28 March 1968, p. “Green Streak.”

Wells, Georgette. “Family sells 143-year-old lumber firm,” The Leader, 24 February 1993, p. FF16.

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Build a Better Davenport: Temple and Burrows Architects http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/06/30/build-a-better-davenport-temple-and-burrows-architects/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/06/30/build-a-better-davenport-temple-and-burrows-architects/ Fri, 30 Jun 2017 17:08:59 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers. This week the Davenport … Continue reading

We are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center’s resources on local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and building materials suppliers.

This week the Davenport architectural firm of Temple & Burrows, active between 1895 and 1949, takes the spotlight.

Local architects Parke T. Burrows and Seth J. Temple designed some of Davenport’s most iconic buildings and residences. The RSSCC preserves over 60 sets of original plans for structures in Davenport, Burlington, and Iowa City, Iowa, as well as those for projects in Illinois. Glass plate negatives, progress photographs, and oversized photographic prints in our image collections also document the firm’s outstanding work.

Parke Tunis Burrows (1871-1953) was born in Davenport, Iowa. He received his B.S. from the University of Illinois in 1892, worked for three years in Chicago, then returned to his hometown to partner with Frederick G. Clausen in the Clausen & Burrows architectural firm. From 1910 to 1925, the firm gained and lost partners, and the name morphed from Clausen, Hubbell & Burrows to Temple, Burrows & McLane, ultimately becoming Temple & Burrows.

Seth Justin Temple (1867-1949) was born in Winona, Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. in architecture from Columbia University in 1892 and subsequently began teaching at the Metropolitan Museum of New York. He then studied in Rome and Paris on the Columbia Traveling Fellowship, returning to the U.S. in 1896 to teach at the University of Illinois. He joined the Davenport architectural firm of Temple, Burrows & McLane in 1904, practiced independently after Burrows’ retirement in 1925, and formed Temple & Temple in 1940 with his son Arthur. Seth J. Temple remained active with the firm until his death in 1949.

Architectural drawings for Temple & Burrows projects available in the RSSCC include these elevations of the Outing Club’s Club House (1902) at 2109 Brady Street:

 …and a detail drawing of the Cafe in the Blackhawk Hotel at 200 East 3rd Street, 1913:

This image depicts the Davenport Commercial Club (now the Executive Square building) at 4th and Main Streets, designed by the firm in 1905:

Other notable Temple & Burrows buildings for which the RSSCC holds drawings include the Scott County Jail (1897), the Music Hall, Chapel, and Library at the Immaculate Conception Academy (1905), the Davenport Hotel (1906), St. Luke’s Hospital (1917), the J.B. Young School (1917), “Three Intermediate Schools” (1918), and the Isolation Hospital (1943). 

Discover more about the built environment in your community in the Special Collections Center at the Davenport Public Library’s Main Street location!

(posted by Karen)

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Build A Better Davenport: The Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home 1865 – 1975 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/06/23/build-a-better-davenport-the-iowa-soldiers-orphans-home-1865-1975/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/06/23/build-a-better-davenport-the-iowa-soldiers-orphans-home-1865-1975/ Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:14:58 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections This week we are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collection Center’s resources and records of local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and other building material … Continue reading

This week we are continuing with the Davenport Public Library’s Summer Reading Program theme of “Build a Better World” by exploring the Richardson-Sloane Special Collection Center’s resources and records of local architects, developers, planners, construction companies, and other building material suppliers.

Our focus this week is on the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home complex. Later renamed the Annie Wittenmyer Home after its founder; the Orphans’ Home ran from 1865 – 1975. 

The site originally began as Camp Roberts, later renamed Camp Kinsman, during the early days of the Civil War. The property was given to Annie Wittenmyer to become the new home for the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home in December 1865.* 

Plat of the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans Home. Designed by H. F. Liebbe. June 16, 1904.

Mrs. Wittenmyer found a barrack style system of cottages with separate dining area. This separate cottage-style system would be continued through the orphanage’s existence.

Cottage System – First Floor Plan

Cottage System – Second Floor Plan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The original campus, including a farm, was once around 300 acres. The property today is about 32 acres and still includes many buildings from the Home.

Campus – 1932

The cottage system was felt to create a home-like atmosphere for the children. We have one photo from the early days of the orphanage.  These barracks would eventually be replaced by structures that resembled cottages.

Image 135 from the Evans’ collection. Labeled View at the Orphans’ Home, Davenport, Iowa.

Over the years the campus grew to include an Administration Building, kitchen/dining room, laundry building, school rooms, gymnasium, chapel, and small hospital. Each building standing separately. This system provided an unexpected benefit when fires destroyed the Administration Building, kitchen/dining room, and laundry buildings over the years. Instead of a massive loss, the fires were contained to the individual structures.

Gymnasium – Built 1921

One building still standing today is the Administration Building designed by architect John W. Ross. Mr. Ross also designed Davenport’s City Hall. This is thought to be the third administration building on the property. At least one previous building was destroyed by fire. 

Administration Building designed by John W. Ross c. 1890-1891.

The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center houses many more plans and pictures for this amazing complex. The records of children who lived at the orphanage starting in 1910 are still retained by the State of Iowa Division of Adult, Children, & Family services.

*For those who may know the story, the orphans arrived in November 1865 to move into the site from their former Orphans’ Homes in Farmington and Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

(posted by Amy D. and Cristina)

Sources:

Annie Wittenmyer Blueprints, map case 3 drawer 8

vm89-0002584  View at the Orphan’s Home, Davenport Iowa. South side of the square. No. 135. Evans’ Western Views, ca.1865-1870 from DPL Photograph Collection

 
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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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