Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2016 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Champions http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-champions/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-champions/ Thu, 08 Dec 2016 06:00:18 -0600 Rachel at Davenport Library Info Cafe The Champions is a documentary about Michael Vick’s pit bulls that were used for dog fighting. In 2007, Michael Vick was found to be involved in an illegal interstate dog fighting ring and served 21 months in jail. The dogs were originally held as “evidence” for the trial.  The American Society for the Prevention of Read More →

championslargeThe Champions is a documentary about Michael Vick’s pit bulls that were used for dog fighting.

In 2007, Michael Vick was found to be involved in an illegal interstate dog fighting ring and served 21 months in jail. The dogs were originally held as “evidence” for the trial.  The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) and other animal organizations, such as the Friends of Animals, took in the former fighting dogs.  Of the 49 dogs that were seized from Vick’s property, only ONE dog was euthanized for being too vicious. One other dog was euthanized due to health problems.

So what happened to the other 47 dogs?  The Champions follows some of the Vick dogs to see what happened to them after they were rescued. One dog, Cherry, is a prime example of how sweet pit bull dogs can be. Cherry was super shy and scared of a lot of things when he was rescued.  With a lot of love and patience from the Friends of Animals, Cherry was able to trust people again and was adopted by a loving family, which includes two small children, a dog and a cat. Recently, Cherry was given his “Best Day of Ever” (find the video on YouTube). Part of his best day was being able to play with kittens. Cherry clearly is a lover, not a fighter.

The theme of this documentary is that pit bulls are just like any other dog. A lot of myths surround the pit bull breed that are simply untrue. Sadly, many pit bulls are euthanized every day due to misconceptions of this breed. There are many communities that have bans on pit bulls. Dogs in these areas would be confiscated and put down. This became a concern when 22 of the Vick dogs had to be taken cross country. Another pit bull owner ran into this situation. He lived in Miami and was transferred to Toronto, which bans pit bulls. He felt that he could not teach his children that dogs were disposable. Now his family continues to live in Miami while he is in Toronto.

The Vick dogs have left a lasting legacy. They have proven that dogs from fighting rings can become family pets, agility dogs and therapy dogs. If dogs are given food, water, shelter and the proper training, they can be loving animals. Now dogs rescued from fighting rings are no longer automatically euthanized. Rescue organizations now step in to help take care of these dogs.

 

Read more about the pit bulls rescued from Michael Vick’s fighting ring:

lost-dogsThe Lost Dogs: Michael Vick’s dogs and their tale of rescue and redemption by Jim Gorant

 

 

audieSaving Audie: a pit bull puppy gets a second chance by Dorothy Hinshaw Patent

Even though this book is in the juvenile section, there is a lot of information for adults and children. A great book to learn about Michael Vick’s dogs and more importantly, the love and compassion people have for dogs.

 

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
75 Years Ago Today: The Attack on Pearl Harbor http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/12/07/75-years-ago-today-the-attack-on-pearl-harbor/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/12/07/75-years-ago-today-the-attack-on-pearl-harbor/ Wed, 07 Dec 2016 17:17:43 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Sunday, December 7th, 1941 was a cold morning in Davenport. The morning newspaper was focused on the tense talks between the United States and Japan.   No one knew that life was going to change dramatically at 7:53 a.m. Hawaiian … Continue reading

Sunday, December 7th, 1941 was a cold morning in Davenport. The morning newspaper was focused on the tense talks between the United States and Japan.

davenport-democrat-120741-1

Davenport Democrat and Leader, December 07, 1941. Pg. 1

 

No one knew that life was going to change dramatically at 7:53 a.m. Hawaiian Time. Later, the entire country gathered around radios, trying to hear news of Japan’s attack on the military base of Pearl Harbor, located on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The news grew steadily worse as the attack on Pearl Harbor unfolded.

davenport-democrat-12081941-1

Davenport Democrat and Leader, December 08, 1941. Pg. 1

 

In an era without the internet, cell phones, and long distance lines, the families who knew their loved ones were serving or working in Hawaii or the Philippines could only wait and worry. Local newspapers printed the names of Scott County men known to be in service in the Pacific area.

davenport-daily-times-120841-4-2

Davenport Daily Times, December 08, 1941. Pg. 4

 

The Rogers family of Davenport was an exception. On December 9th they learned that their son, Dean, was safe. An employee of Pan American Airways, he had been on Wake Island as the attack started. Pan American directed an airplane flying from the Philippines to the Island before continuing on to the United States. Dean and other airport personnel quickly boarded the plane upon its arrival. The pilot managed to successfully evade Japanese airplanes firing at them and safely arrive in the United States. (Davenport Daily Times, December 9, 1941. Pg. 8.)

Local newspapers printed pictures of those unaccounted for along with family information. Fortunately for his family, John B. Lakers, another local man, survived the attack on the U.S.S. Oklahoma and went on to serve in the U.S. Navy through December 1945 before being honorably discharged.

davenport-daily-times-120941-6

Davenport Daily Times, December 09, 1941. Pg. 6

It wasn’t until about December 16th that newspapers began to hear reports from families; the United States government would not release the names of casualties or wounded to newspapers. However, families were allowed to update the news media when they heard their family members’ status.

In the confusing days following the attack, families of many sailors and soldiers received incorrect information from the government. Several local families were informed that their family member had died in the attack, only to later receive notice they had survived. Sadly, a few families learned those they though had survived did not.

In the days after Pearl Harbor, there was a rush of local men to enlist. While not all were accepted, a large number were. They soon went to fight a long war in Europe and the Pacific.

davenport-daily-times-120841-15

Davenport Daily Times, December 08, 1941. Pg. 15

 

Everyone in Scott County, Iowa, and the United States as a whole, would soon face great loss and sacrifice.

(posted by Amy D.)

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
The Librarians: Season One http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-librarians-season-one/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-librarians-season-one/ Wed, 07 Dec 2016 06:00:00 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe The Librarians is an American fantasy-adventure television show that premiered in 2014. If the title sounds familiar, it should! This show is a direct spin-off of The Librarian film series starring Noah Wyle as Flynn Carsen. (Look below for the list of The Librarian movies available for check-out). This television series begins by introducing viewers to Read More →

the-librariansThe Librarians is an American fantasy-adventure television show that premiered in 2014. If the title sounds familiar, it should! This show is a direct spin-off of The Librarian film series starring Noah Wyle as Flynn Carsen. (Look below for the list of The Librarian movies available for check-out).

This television series begins by introducing viewers to Eve Baird, a NATO agent who bumps into the librarian Flynn Carsen, a meeting that sends the two off on a new journey together. Baird becomes the librarian’s new guardian and, after a quick and dirty introduction to the Library and its magic, is immediately helping Flynn on a rescue mission. It turns out that someone is killing off potential Librarians and they need to be stopped.

Hijinks ensue and we soon find Flynn off to the find the Library after it disappears and is lost in time and space in an effort to save itself from the Serpent Brotherhood. Baird is left to protect the new Librarians and help Jenkins, the caretaker of the Library’s branch office, train the newbies. Meet Jacob Stone, Cassandra Cillian, and Ezekiel Jones: three people who were invited by the Library to interview for the Librarian position that was ultimately given to Flynn Carsen after the three didn’t show up for their auditions. They are each geniuses in their own rights with quirks and specialized knowledge that allow them to solve problems and escape from tricky situations seemingly at the last moment. Throughout the first season, this foursome, plus Jenkins at times, finds themselves set off on adventures to rescue ancient mysterious artifacts. These artifacts have magical powers and either the evil Serpent Brotherhood wants to snatch them up for themselves or they are somehow disrupting normal everyday life. Either way, this show is rife with comedic and stoic moments as the Librarians rush to solve problems, work together, learn new things, save the world, and keep magic alive.

This show is full of history lessons and quirky/off-the-wall humor, much like The Librarian movies are. When you think you are just enjoying a new television show, you’ll realize that you are in fact learning something new, whether it’s about Nikola Tesla, Shakespeare, King Arthur, Santa, Egyptian Gods, the minotaur, or a variety of other historical, mythical, or magical things. This show is full of librarians after all, so you’re going to learn something new!

Once you finish the first season, be sure to go and put the second season on hold! (The third season is still on television.)


This television show is based on/is a direct spin-off of The Librarian film series starring Noah Wyle. This is a series of three movies: The Librarian: Quest for the Spear, The Librarian: Return to King Solomon’s Mines, and The Librarian: Curse of the Judas Chalice.

librarian-quest-for-the-spear librarian-return-to-mine librarian-curse-for-judas-chalice

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
The Infiltrator http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-infiltrator/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-infiltrator/ Tue, 06 Dec 2016 06:00:35 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe The Infiltrator starring Bryan Cranston, as well as several other well-known actors and actresses, is an American crime drama film that is based on the book, The Infiltrator: My Secret Life Inside the Dirty Banks Behind Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel by Robert Mazur. Its basis on Mazur’s autobiography lends this movie a compelling fact-based story Read More →

infiltrator2The Infiltrator starring Bryan Cranston, as well as several other well-known actors and actresses, is an American crime drama film that is based on the book, The Infiltrator: My Secret Life Inside the Dirty Banks Behind Pablo Escobar’s Medellin Cartel by Robert Mazur. Its basis on Mazur’s autobiography lends this movie a compelling fact-based story with a cast that both resembles the real-life characters and their mannerisms. This movie tells the story of the 1980s bust of Pablo Escobar’s money-laundering organization.

The Infiltrator recounts the story of Robert Mazur’s discovery of a massive money laundering scheme involving Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. Mazur, a U.S. Customs special agent, is up for retirement after being injured during his previous operation. He instead finds himself back undercover as “Bob Musella”, a wealth mob-connected businessman who becomes a pivotal player for a lot of drug lords who need help laundering their dirty money. He eventually infiltrates the Medellin Cartel, the world’s largest cartel, and discovers the vast money-laundering organization of Pablo Escobar, a massive and well-known drug lord. Mazur also succeeds in taking down the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, aka the BCCI, for their involvement.

This movie shines a light on the ethics of big banks and government, as well as all of the different players, organizations, and activities necessary to keep a massive undercover investigation from being discovered. Mazur’s journey to discovering Escobar’s money-laundering organization and its eventual takedown did not happen overnight. He started small and had to gain buy-in and trust from lower level drug dealers and suppliers in order to prove his worth. Mazur befriended dirty bankers, businessmen, and drug lords across the world as he spent years infiltrating the Medellin Cartel’s criminal hierarchy. This movie tells the story of how Mazur brought these criminals to justice and destroyed the bankers and businessman who were manipulating world-wide finance systems in order to benefit the drug lords, terrorists, and politicians who gave them their money.

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
A Year Between Friends by Maria Vettese and Stephanie Barnes http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-year-between-friends-by-maria-vettese-and-stephanie-barnes/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/a-year-between-friends-by-maria-vettese-and-stephanie-barnes/ Mon, 05 Dec 2016 06:00:56 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Maria and Stephanie both live in Portland, but are 3191 miles apart. That’s because Maria lives in Portland, Maine and Stephanie lives in Portland, Oregon. Over the years these friends have shared their lives with each other through letters and photographs. They have managed to forge and maintain a deep bond across the distance, exchanging Read More →

yearbetweenfriendsMaria and Stephanie both live in Portland, but are 3191 miles apart. That’s because Maria lives in Portland, Maine and Stephanie lives in Portland, Oregon. Over the years these friends have shared their lives with each other through letters and photographs. They have managed to forge and maintain a deep bond across the distance, exchanging recipes and practical life tips and sharing the ups and downs of life. They are small town neighbors in the new world of technology.

Collaborating since 2007, Maria and Stephanie continue to document their lives in their blog, 3191. Twice a week they post a diptych, a picture from of them showing what’s going on in their separate lives right now. The focus is on the small and ordinary – flowers, children at play, bounty from the garden, the outdoors and sleeping cats. Recipes and crafts are shared and advice requested and given. A Year Between Friends follows the same format, beginning in January and running through December, with an emphasis on the small pleasures of a life well lived. There are big events too – Maria loses her Mother unexpectedly early in the year, and gives birth to a baby girl in late July. And they aren’t always apart – Stephanie makes the trip cross country after the birth of baby Luna to spend time with Maria and her family.

The photography is exquisite –  you can learn a lot about perspective, cropping and lighting by studying these pictures. The real value, of course, is the stories they tell, of how different and yet how similar these lives are, their mutual appreciation of the beauty around them and the love and support they bring to each other.

Besides the photos and letters, A Year Between Friends includes several crafts, most of which are lovely and practical and simple to make (although I’m not sure about the pinecone ornament – no mater how charming, that’s a lot of sewing!) There are also recipes; I’m not a cook, but I’d be happy to eat just about anything shown here!

This is a lovely, quiet book, an excellent choice to end or begin the year (or anytime really), inviting you to step back and take a look at your life and what is really important. What is it you want to remember when you look back? A child’s smile? A walk through a summer-green forest? Cookies fresh from the oven? A friend’s laughter? A Year Between Friends shows just how special the ordinary can be.

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Genius http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/genius/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/genius/ Fri, 02 Dec 2016 06:00:37 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe I’m a sucker for literary movies, movies that give me a glimpse into the lives of my favorite authors, the time period that they were writing, and their motivations for writing. Genius fell right into my lap one day and I knew I needed to watch it. Genius tells the story of the relationship between Maxwell Perkins Read More →

genius2I’m a sucker for literary movies, movies that give me a glimpse into the lives of my favorite authors, the time period that they were writing, and their motivations for writing. Genius fell right into my lap one day and I knew I needed to watch it.

Genius tells the story of the relationship between Maxwell Perkins and Thomas Wolfe. Perkins was a book editor at Scribner, one who discovered F. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway, among others. Thomas Wolfe’s manuscript was put into Perkins’ hands by an associate who said that is was unique and that he should take a look at it. What follows is a deep dive into the psyche of Wolfe and Perkins’ relationship.

Wolfe is portrayed as a lovable American South writer who does not believe his novel will ever get published after he worked on it for four years. Perkins drops into his life right when he is at a crossroads. The two work together to carve down Wolfe’s massive manuscript into something the public will actually read. The scenes where Wolfe and Perkins are actively working on his manuscript are some of my favorite as both of their personalities shine as they rally for their favorite parts to be saved or for certain sections to be cut. Perkins’ relationship with his family as well as Wolfe’s relationship with his lady benefactor also play key roles in this movie.

Ernest Hemingway and F. Scott Fitzgerald make frequent appearances in the movie, letting viewers see into their own personal lives and the struggles they were facing as writers. Seeing the characters’ relationships grow and change throughout the course of this movie really allows viewers to see how complex Wolfe and Perkins’ relationship was with each other and with the outside world.

This movie is based on the 1978 National Book Award-winner Max Perkins: Editor of Genius by A. Scott Berg. It’s important to remember that this is a dramatized version of a biography, so the director and writers strayed from the book a little bit. If you’re curious about what was left out or need a little more background, check out this New Yorker article entitled “The Odd Factual Gaps in Michael Grandage’s ‘Genius’ “and judge the movie’s authenticity and factuality for yourself.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
December Reading Challenge – Holiday Stories http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/december-reading-challenge-holiday-stories/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/december-reading-challenge-holiday-stories/ Thu, 01 Dec 2016 06:00:47 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Hello and Welcome to the final Reading Challenge for 2016! This month we’re going to take a look at Holiday Stories, perfect for this month of festivals and celebrations. There are no shortage of Holiday Stories to read so you should have no trouble finding one no matter what kind of book you prefer. Classics Read More →

online colorHello and Welcome to the final Reading Challenge for 2016! This month we’re going to take a look at Holiday Stories, perfect for this month of festivals and celebrations.

There are no shortage of Holiday Stories to read so you should have no trouble finding one no matter what kind of book you prefer. Classics (A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens), mysteries (Fields Where They Lay by Timothy Hallinan or Christmas Caramel Murder by Joanne Fluke) (and what is with all the murder mysteries set during Christmas?!), bestselling authors (The Christmas Train by David Baldacci and A Lowcountry Christmas by Mary Alice Monroe) and romance (A Baxter Family Christmas by Karen Kingsbury and Comfort and Joy by Kristin Hannah) Try a keyword search with the terms “christmas fiction” or “christmas mystery” in the catalog or check the displays at the libraries for lots more titles.

There are a couple of books I’d like to highlight. One is considered a classic but you may not have read it and it’s well worth tracking down. It’s A Christmas Memory by Truman Capote, an autobiographical novella. In it, a young boy stays with a distant relative; both are somewhat outcast from their family, living on the fringes, lonely souls that understand each other. Together they make a special fruitcake, gathering the ingredients and making the recipe with love and attention. This is a not a saccharine happily-ever-after story (a great antidote to those Hallmark movies), but instead is sad and wistful. It carries a powerful message of love and memory and the weight of family and the past that the Christmas season brings. Poignant and beautiful and have lots of tissues on hand.

Another, much lighter book (but still thoughtful and complex) is Winter Solstice by Rosamund Pilcher. This is a great one to curl up with on a wintry day. A tragedy causes five lives to intersect in unexpected ways, leading them to an idyllic country house. Set in Scotland with it’s grand traditions of Christmas and Hogmanay, this heartwarming book explores the meaning of family and connecting and opening yourself up to possibilities.

This is also the season of crazy as in, everyone is crazy busy. Cooking, decorating, shopping, wrapping, entertaining – who has time to read a book?! For you I recommend going to the Children’s picture book section and looking through some of the most beautiful books available. Many carry a message, but they are all almost guaranteed to put you in the Christmas spirit and can be read very quickly. Many are short enough that it wouldn’t be too much of a hardship for the family to gather together, abandon their phones and tablets for a few minutes and listen to someone read the book aloud. My recommendation and very favorite Christmas book is The Polar Express by Chris van Allsburg (skip the movie, SKIP THE MOVIE!) Gorgeous illustrations and a truly magical story make for the perfect reminder of Christmas joy.

Of course, Christmas is not the only holiday in December, but it does dominant the book selection. A good alternative is My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories that includes Hanukkah, Winter Solstice and New Years as well as Christmas, quick reads that will get you in the holiday spirit no matter your favorite December holiday.

What about you – what is your favorite Christmas book? And what will you be reading this month?

 

 

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Online Reading Challenge – November Wrap-Up http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-november-wrap-up/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-november-wrap-up/ Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:00:46 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Hello Fellow Readers! November is nearly over – how did you do with the Reading Challenge this month? If the fact that we had to keep restocking the displays at the library are any indication, this was a popular topic. It’s always interesting to take a peek into another life and see how that person Read More →

online colorHello Fellow Readers!

November is nearly over – how did you do with the Reading Challenge this month? If the fact that we had to keep restocking the displays at the library are any indication, this was a popular topic. It’s always interesting to take a peek into another life and see how that person lived – and in the process we learn a lot about ourselves as well!

When I looked through the titles for the Other Lives Challenge, I noticed that many (not all, but many) were about unknown or behind-the-scenes women – the wives of famous men or the anonymous women that supported great works. Women have historically been regulated to the background and their voices considered too unimportant to record but through fictional biographies we can gain some insight into what they accomplished and how they lived.

For this month’s challenge I read The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier which is a fictional account of the famous Lady and the Unicorn tapestries. Created in the late 1400s in France, very little is known about the artist that created the scenes depicted in the tapestries, the weavers that crafted them or the noble family that commissioned them. Chevalier researched not only the customs and lifestyle of the time period, but also the craft of weaving in the 1400s, an art form that was practiced and mastered in Brussels where the tapestries are believed to have been made.

There is a lot of history in this book including the lifestyles and customs of the 15th century, the art of tapestry weaving and the guilds that protect the quality of the tapestries, the role of women both noble and common. The narrative jumps to a different person each chapter, from the artist Chevalier imagines painted the scenes, to the wife of the nobleman who commissions the tapestries, to the wife of the weaver tasked with such an enormous commission, to the rebellious daughter of the nobleman. There is no clear interpretation of what the tapestries represent and much speculation about the women and scenes even today, but Chevalier has spun a story that intertwines various characters and how the making of these tapestries touched and influenced many lives.

I’ve been lucky enough to see the actual tapestries (they are on display in carefully regulated conditions to preserve them at the Cluny Museum in Paris). They are extraordinarily beautiful, full of detail and color and life and exquisite craftsmanship. The Lady and the Unicorn makes for fascinating reading and is the next best thing until you can visit them yourself.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-way-i-used-to-be-by-amber-smith/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-way-i-used-to-be-by-amber-smith/ Tue, 29 Nov 2016 06:00:30 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe The Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith is a deeply moving, traumatic examination of one young woman’s struggle to overcome the aftermath of a rape. Eden, a 14-year old teenage girl, is raped by Kevin, her older brother’s best friend and college roommate. Her family is asleep down the hall while he crawls into her Read More →

the-way-i-used-to-beThe Way I Used to Be by Amber Smith is a deeply moving, traumatic examination of one young woman’s struggle to overcome the aftermath of a rape. Eden, a 14-year old teenage girl, is raped by Kevin, her older brother’s best friend and college roommate. Her family is asleep down the hall while he crawls into her bed. Eden is the typical band geek, good girl who lives in fear of Kevin as he tells her that he will kill her and that no one will believe her if she talks. She is paralyzed with fear and doesn’t know what to do except try to live her life like normal, an idea that quickly fails as she becomes a new person overnight.

This book follows Eden through all four years of high school, highlighting her relationships with friends and family as she keeps this dark secret under wraps. School becomes increasingly more difficult for Eden as she turns to lies, booze, sex, and parties to smother her emotions. Kevin’s younger sister, Amanda, who Eden used to be friends with, turns against her and begins spreading vicious rumors about her around school. Eden’s best friend, Mara, knows nothing about what happened to her and the two move through high school experiencing some typical high school activities: dying their hair, first crushes, getting piercings, drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes for the first time, going to parties, doing drugs, and getting their drivers’ licenses. All the while, distance begins to grow between the two. Eden also finds herself separated from her other friends and her family. She has buried who she used to be, buried her emotions, and buried her secret deep inside.

As Eden grows older, readers are able to dissect the way her rape has affected her personality and her relationships. The way Eden treats herself changes drastically from her freshman year to her senior year of high school, as evidenced through her inner monologue throughout the book. How she believes others to see her changes throughout the book as well. The long-term view of the effect this trauma has on Eden allows readers to gain a better understanding of the guilt, hatred, and complex emotions survivors face in the aftermath of rape and sexual assault. The Way I Used to Be is not an easy book to read as watching Eden disintegrate is painful, but the truth and emotions revealed are so vivid and true-to-life that this book becomes a necessary read to understand the emotions survivors experience on a day-to-day basis.  Eden carries a double burden – the weight of carrying her secret and the violation of rape. She shows strength, power, survival, disappointment, pain, heartbreak, and massive loss throughout this book, leaving readers to grow attached to her well-being and her journey through a troubled adolescent made even more difficult by rape. The Way I Used to Be takes readers on an emotional rollercoaster as Eden struggles to find her way back to herself in the aftermath of her rape.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
What would Alice do? : Advice for the Modern Woman by Lauren Laverne http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/what-would-alice-do-advice-for-the-modern-woman-by-lauren-laverne/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/what-would-alice-do-advice-for-the-modern-woman-by-lauren-laverne/ Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:12 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe Many people turn to books for advice on how to live their lives or when they have certain questions they want answered. Do you have a favorite book that you refer back to, that you read when you need a pick-me-up, that you pull quotes from to inspire yourself? I certainly do and almost all Read More →

what-would-alice-doMany people turn to books for advice on how to live their lives or when they have certain questions they want answered. Do you have a favorite book that you refer back to, that you read when you need a pick-me-up, that you pull quotes from to inspire yourself? I certainly do and almost all of them are books from my childhood. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll is one of my steady go-to’s.

What would Alice do? : Advice for the Modern Woman with a foreword by Lauren Laverne pulls quotes from Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass and matches them up with a wide variety of categories that all relate. Instead of reading this book cover to cover, I found myself flipping through looking for quotes that caught my eye.

Crack open this book for advice from Alice on:

  • Being Inspirational
  • Having a Bad Day
  • Getting On at Work
  • Dealing with Difficult Characters
  • Taking Risks
  • Saying What You Mean
  • Minding Your Manners
  • Keeping Cool in a Crisis
  • Being a Feminist
  • Health and Safety
  • Enjoying Food and Drink
  • Being Brave
  • Appearances
  • Fun and Games
  • The Value of a Good Education
  • Growing Up

Even though this book is marketed as advice for the modern woman, the quotes present inside, I felt, are not uniquely meant for just women. The categories that Laverne chooses are full of helpful advice for everyone and the messages present everyone could benefit from. We could all use some new words of advice every now and then.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Library Closed for Thanksgiving http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/library-closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Thu, 24 Nov 2016 06:00:41 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe The Davenport Public Library will be closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday, November 24 and 25. All three buildings will reopen on Saturday November 26 with their regular hours of 9:00am to 5:30pm. Have a safe and happy holiday!

thanksgivingdayThe Davenport Public Library will be closed for Thanksgiving on Thursday and Friday, November 24 and 25. All three buildings will reopen on Saturday November 26 with their regular hours of 9:00am to 5:30pm.

Have a safe and happy holiday!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
No Turkey Notes This Year?! Not Us! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/23/no-turkey-notes-this-year-not-us/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/23/no-turkey-notes-this-year-not-us/ Wed, 23 Nov 2016 14:05:16 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections You didn’t think we would skip our Turkey Note tradition this year, did you?! It’s just not Thanksgiving without those terribly written, yet still loved little poems! What? You don’t know what a Turkey Note is? Check us out over … Continue reading

You didn’t think we would skip our Turkey Note tradition this year, did you?! It’s just not Thanksgiving without those terribly written, yet still loved little poems!


What? You don’t know what a Turkey Note is? Check us out over here and be sure to come back for this year’s installment.

And now for your reading enjoyment…

Turkey Squirrel.
Turkey Deer.
Turkey wants to spread
Thanksgiving cheer.happy-turkey-day-1Turkey turnip.
Turkey beet.
Turkey needs to be faster
On his feet!

Turkey leaves.
Turkey mow.
Turkey is hoping
For Thanksgiving snow!

stock-vector-illustration-of-a-turkey-running-with-a-big-smile-on-his-face-and-a-baseball-for-his-body-213602329Turkey high
Turkey low
Turkey says ‘Go Cubs Go!’

Turkey blue
Turkey red
I think you’ll need
to roll me to my bedimages

Turkey up
Turkey down
I think I’ve gained 10 pounds!

Turkey breast?
Turkey thigh?
I don’t care
I want pie!

turkey-pie-3450545

Turkey Orange
Turkey Gray
Have a Happy Turkey Day!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Today in Quad-City History: The Iowa-Illinois Memorial Bridge http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/18/today-in-quad-city-history-the-iowa-illinois-memorial-bridge/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/18/today-in-quad-city-history-the-iowa-illinois-memorial-bridge/ Fri, 18 Nov 2016 17:00:08 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections If you’re like most Quad City residents, you don’t think about our bridges (unless with no small amount of frustration when traffic clogs things up.) It’s hard to think about not having bridges today, but on this date, November 18, in 1935, … Continue reading

If you’re like most Quad City residents, you don’t think about our bridges (unless with no small amount of frustration when traffic clogs things up.) It’s hard to think about not having bridges today, but on this date, November 18, in 1935, a dedication was held for the new Iowa-Illinois Memorial bridge.

dplvm89-000740

Gentleman stops for a quick picture of the construction. Photo taken from the UMVDIA website.

 

The bridge connected Bettendorf, IA and Moline, IL and was the result of many years’ planning and working. The bridge was built with PWA funds in the amount of $1.8 million dollars.

dplvm89-000229

Photograph taken during the construction of the first span of the Iowa-Illinois Memorial Bridge. Photo taken from the UMVDIA website

As you can imagine, with the bridge connecting two cities in two states on opposite sides of the Mississippi River, the dedication was highly attended. In the true spirit of cooperation, Clyde L. Herring, Governor of Iowa, and Henry Horner, Governor of Illinois, held the ribbon taut in the center span of the bridge while Mrs. Joseph L. Hecht, wife of the Vice Chairman of the Davenport Bridge Commission, cut it and formally opened the bridge.

dplx846a

Mr. Joseph L. Hecht, Vice Chairman of the Davenport Bridge Commission. Photo taken from the UMVDIA website.

 

Both governors “…expressed the sentiment that the bridge stands as a most fitting and permanent memorial to the World War veterans in whose honor it was dedicated.” A shout went up as the crowds on both shores saw the ribbon flutter to the ground.

People were invited to walk the bridge and satisfy their curiosity, as vehicle traffic was not allowed until after the ceremony. From 4 pm to 11 pm vehicles were permitted to cross without paying a toll, but at 11 pm the regular fee schedule went into effect. (Did you know that the bridge used to be a toll bridge!?) Festivities continued beyond the ribbon cutting: parades through the business district by music groups and an American Legion banquet in which Ray Murphy, national commander of the American Legion and the representative for the veterans at the ribbon ceremony, was a guest speaker.

Some of the ‘Distinguished Visitor’s’ included: Congressmen Jacobsen and Eicher of Iowa, Chester Thompson of Illinois; former Assistant Secretary of War Col. C.B. Robbins; and administrators P.F. Hopkins, Iowa PWA, and L.S. Hill, Iowa WPA.

(posted by Jessica)

Sources

“Thousands at Dedication of Bridge,” The Daily Times Davenport-Rock Island-Moline. Davenport, Iowa, Monday November 18, 1935, p.1

“New Bridge and Pricipals in Dedication Ceremonies,” The Daily Times Davenport-Rock Island-Moline. Davenport, Iowa, Monday November 18, 1935, p.1

“Governors Laud Bridge Sponsors At Ceremonies,” The Daily Times Davenport-Rock Island-Moline. Davenport, Iowa, Monday November 18, 1935, p.1

“Many Dignitaries Present as Bettendorf Moline Span Is Formally Opened Today,” The Daily Times Davenport-Rock Island-Moline. Davenport, Iowa, Monday November 18, 1935, p.1

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Veterans Day 2016: Images from the Great War http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/10/veterans-day-2016-images-from-the-great-war/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/10/veterans-day-2016-images-from-the-great-war/ Thu, 10 Nov 2016 13:28:59 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In honor of Veterans Day we have chosen to post a few photographs from World War I that reside in the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center image collections. Our first photograph is of Major Arthur M. Compton. He was born in Davenport, … Continue reading

In honor of Veterans Day we have chosen to post a few photographs from World War I that reside in the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center image collections.

dplx1535a

Major A. Compton c. 1917. DPLVolume 165: dplx-1535. One of four negatives taken at the Hostetler Studio, Davenport, Iowa.

Our first photograph is of Major Arthur M. Compton. He was born in Davenport, and in 1913 married Gertrude Whitaker. During World War I, he was an instructor in field artillery at Ft. Sill, Oklahoma.  He was later promoted to colonel, being the youngest one in the Army. He later worked for the City of Davenport as an engineer before going on to the same job for the Levee Improvement Commission. (1)

Our second and third photographs are from the Rock Island Arsenal during World War I.

Local communities not only supplied soldiers for the cause, but also over 14,000 residents supported the war effort by working at the Rock Island Arsenal, producing weapons and equipment much needed in Europe.

Below is a wartime photograph of Shop I on the Rock Island Arsenal. The label reads: “showing a bunch of 75s’ ready for the assembler”.

75s’ most likely refers to the 75 mm Gun Carriages that were produced at the Arsenal during the war.

dplvm89-000882

August 23, 1918. VM89-000882.

Our final photograph is of the largest piece of equipment produced on the Arsenal during the war. It was very heavy, weighing in at 40 tons.

dplvm89-000906

May 22, 1919. VM89-000906.

This photograph was taken in Shop M of the Rock Island Arsenal. It is of the Mark VIII Tank. The Arsenal received an order to produce 100 of the tanks in 1919. The tanks were widely used until the 1930’s, when more modern replacements came into the field. (2)

To see more photographs and images online, please visit the Upper Mississippi Valley Digital Image Archive at www.umvphotoarchive.org.

We would like to thank all veterans for their service to our country. You have our deepest gratitude.

posted by Amy D.

—————————————————————————————–

Sources consulted:

(1) Obituary for Compton in the Davenport Times-Democrat, March 9, 1965.

(2)Slattery, Thomas. An Illustrated History Of The Rock Island Arsenal and Arsenal Island  SC977.3393 SLA.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Election Seasons Past in Scott County, Iowa http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/07/election-seasons-past-in-scott-county-iowa/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/11/07/election-seasons-past-in-scott-county-iowa/ Mon, 07 Nov 2016 14:11:34 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections There is a rich political history in Scott County, Iowa, as evidenced by these items here in the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center. As the 2016 election season winds to a close, take a brief journey with us through some past highlights, such … Continue reading

There is a rich political history in Scott County, Iowa, as evidenced by these items here in the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center. As the 2016 election season winds to a close, take a brief journey with us through some past highlights, such as the activities of the League of Women Voters in the area:
league-of-women-voters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

lwv-caption

 

(1)

 

In 1905, Joe R. Lane’s name was submitted for consideration as the first nominee for gubernatorial candidate from Scott County, Iowa by the Times. Mr. Lane had not sought the position, nor was he consulted prior to the announcement. Other papers, such as the Bellevue Leader and the Maquoketa Record weighed in immediately:

joe-lanejoe-lane-2
(2)

 

Candidates for local offices in the early 1900’s can be found in the RSSCC Ephemera Collection: John E. Fleming threw his hat into the ring for Probate Clerk in 1912, and Otto Smallfield sought election as Davenport’s Alderman at Large.

john-fleming

otto-smallfield

labor-parties

Labor union members have been actively involved in the area’s political scene for years. (3)

dst-1dst-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It appears most everything has been “cussed-and-discussed” in elections! (4)

Election Day is tomorrow, Tuesday, November 8th. The Scott County Auditor’s Office website (http://www.scottcountyiowa.com/auditor/election-central) has great links to ballots, polling places, and other information about the 2016 election.

Get inspired to vote from these women, first permitted to exercise their right at Iowa polling places in the year 1920! (5)

suffrage

posted by Karen

________________________________________________________

(1) Davenport Daily Times Thursday, May 22, 1952, p. G-1 in League of Women Voters 1950’s Scrapbook, Acc. #2006-15.

(2) Images from the Bellevue Leader (Bellevue, IA) and the Maquoketa Record (Maquoketa, IA). Political Scrapbook, Acc. #X-04.

(3) Items belonging to Henry Schrage from the RSSCC Ephemera Collection, Biography folders.

(4) League of Women Voters 1950’s Scrapbook, Acc. #2006-15.

(5) Davenport Daily Times Monday, October 30, 1950, p. G-1 in League of Women Voters 1950’s Scrapbook, Acc. #2006-15.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Henry Bastian: A serial murderer among us – Part II http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/31/henry-bastian-a-serial-murderer-among-us-part-ii/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/31/henry-bastian-a-serial-murderer-among-us-part-ii/ Mon, 31 Oct 2016 16:27:30 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Part I of this story may be found here. Henry Bastian’s suicide did not stem the flow of gossip about Frederick Kuschmann’s death in Rock Island and Davenport. In fact, according to newspaper reports, people began to wonder about several young … Continue reading

Part I of this story may be found here.

Henry Bastian’s suicide did not stem the flow of gossip about Frederick Kuschmann’s death in Rock Island and Davenport. In fact, according to newspaper reports, people began to wonder about several young hired men who had left the Bastian farm without saying goodbye to anyone.

The March 15th edition of the Davenport Daily Republican openly questioned if there was not more to Henry Bastian than met the eye. It reported on area residents’ recollections of two men in particular: Fritz Kreinsen and John Lauderbach.

When neighbors asked Bastian why Fritz Kreinsen no longer worked on the farm, he told them that the young German immigrant had decided to move to Wisconsin to be near friends. No one could remember Kreinsen mentioning a desire to relocate, and it seemed odd that he left so quickly. The next year, in 1895, Bastian said John Lauderbach had left his employ to travel westward, but the relatives who came looking for the young man they had not heard from in a long time knew of no such plan.

Also odd was the fact that Henry Bastian had suddenly appeared near the McLaughlin’s house just after the robber had run off.  He claimed to have been looking for lost horse when he noticed the barn fire and wanted to come help put it out. Over a hundred acres of land separated the Bastian and McLaughlin farmhouses.

Then there were the rumors that the police had found human blood stains at the height of a man’s head on the walls of the Bastian cow shed.

By March 20th, public opinion held that Henry Bastian had killed Frederick Kuschmann and most likely set fire to the McLaughlin barn in an attempt to rob the farmhouse during the commotion. Also, Bastian had no money to pay for groceries on the day Kuschmann was murdered: he had recently sold a horse for $25 and sent $20 of that to his mother in Geneseo, Illinois.

Further investigation revealed that Frederick Kuschmann’s last day of work had originally been set for February 27th (the day of the McLaughlin barn fire) but Henry Bastian asked him to stay until the 29th to make up for some days he had been sick.

On March 24, 1896 the Bastian family sold the household belongings and farm equipment left on the farm. People from all over came to purchase the suspected murder’s items and to have a look around the farm. While the police investigation continued, the farm could not be sold, so the land was rented to H. S. Meyers for four months. Mr. Meyers charged curious people $0.10 a person to walk down the farm lane and explore the property. He hoped curiosity would die down by the time planting season began.

As each day passed, more and more people began to wonder about the fate of Kreinsen and Lauderbach. Could Henry Bastian have murdered them, too? A rumor began to circulate that there was a witness to Bastian’s deadly deeds…

Law enforcement finally found this man, Charles Reiher, in Chicago. Mr. Reiher revealed that when he had worked for Henry Bastian, he had seen his boss burying the body of a man underneath a tree on the farm. He admitted he had been reluctant to speak against the well-respected Mr. Bastian for fear of being branded as crazy — he had once been committed to an insane asylum and did not wish to return.

With this new information, the sheriff obtained permission from the Bastians to begin digging on the family farm.

capture-milan

Milan, Illinois 1894 Plat showing the C. Bastian farm. Christian Bastian was Henry’s father. Henry took over the farm from his elderly parents in the early 1890’s. Atlas of Rock Island County, Illinois SC 917.73393 IOW

On April 1, 1896 Rock Island County Sheriff Hemenway, Deputy Sheriff S. S. Hull, Robert Johnson, Edward Lane, and Thomas Norton went out to the farm to see what could be found. A crowd of newspaper reporters and interested locals followed them onto the property.

They decided to dig near the granary of the farm in a rubbish-filled area that had once been used by hogs. They soon uncovered a human body. It was noted that the skull had suffered some form of trauma on the left side. Henry Bastian was left-handed.

One of the spectators, Mr. Peter Grampp, was able to identify the body as that of his friend John Lauderbach.

Mr. Bastian, it appeared, had an ingenious plan. He hired men to work his farm for a set period of time. Stating he did not have the money to pay them weekly, he would then offer them room and board and a promise to pay a lump sum at the end of the contract. On or near the last day of the man’s employment, Henry Bastian would kill him and bury the body on his farm.

Mr. Lauderbach’s contract with Bastian was to end in February, 1895 when he would be paid $170. He was expected to room at Mr. Grampp’s house until finding a new work arrangement. But Mr. Bastian told Mr. Grampp that John had decided to go to Montana instead, and that he had taken him to the train station himself. Mr. Grampp began to worry when he stopped receiving letters from his friend and when Lauderbach’s mother wrote to ask him why she had not heard from her son.

The next day, a coroner’s inquest into the death of John Lauderbach began. Meanwhile, the sherriff and his crew continued to dig on the farm. A jug of kerosene and a club covered in blood were found in the cow shed; two watches with signs of fire damage were found in the hog pen. The gold watch was identified as John Lauderbach’s and the silver one thought to have been Fritz Kreinsen’s. Also in the hog pen were pieces of men’s clothing and buttons, and the worst discovery of all: a portion of a human skull, likely Fritz Kreinsen’s.

Mr. Kreinsen had been saving money to buy a farm and bring his fiance from Germany. Henry Bastian had kindly offered to bank Kreinsen’s over $1000 in savings. Not surprisingly, no account in Fritz Kreinsen’s name was found in any of the local banks.

The inquest found that John Lauderbach had been murdered, most likely by Henry Bastian. Eventually, Lauderbach’s body was laid to rest in Chippianock Cemetery, the same place Henry Bastian had been buried a few weeks earlier.

The digging continued. In an old cistern well the police found several trunks and human bones. Handles and other metal pieces from trunks were found buried in different locations on the farm. The fact that they appeared to have been burned led authorities to suspect that Bastian had used fire to destroy evidence.

By mid-April 1896, local authorities had received information on a least nine missing persons with a direct connection to Henry Bastian. They also discovered a trunk that had been left in the Milan train depot for three years. The trunk belonged to August Johnson, also originally thought to have traveled west once his work for Bastian was complete. Authorities also found that Johnson’s local bank account had not been touched for three years. Based on the timeline supplied by Mr. Johnson’s family, authorities believed that the body Charles Reiher had seen Henry Bastian bury under a tree was August’s.

In late April, the coroner reopened the case of Frederick Kuschmann. The body was exhumed and re-examined. No evidence of injury was found to the body except the head, which appeared to have been hit with a sharp object on the left side. Eva Bastian and her sister-in-law Carrie Bastian were both called to testify at the inquest along with witnesses from the night Kuschmann’s body was found.

Mrs. Bastian reported that she was visiting her parents on the night Frederick Kuschmann was found dead. She also stated she had been at her parents’ house the day John Lauderbach disappeared as well. Henry Bastian had encouraged her visits on both occasions.

Carrie Bastian’s testimony was confusing. She stated she was in the house bathing and did not see Frederick Kuschmann leave the farm, but she also claimed to have seen her brother pay him. She insisted that Henry was innocent of any crimes.

On April 28, 1896, the inquest closed the case of Frederick Kuschmann. It concluded that he had died at Henry Bastian’s hands. At this time the police investigation could go no further — there was no clear direction on where to continue digging. For many families and friends, the question of what happened to loved ones who had come to work on the Bastian farm remained an open one.

Those known to have been murdered by Henry Bastian were Frederick Kuschmann, Fritz Kriensen, and John Lauderbach. Those likely to have met the same fate were Marshall Lewis, Axel Sternberg, Hugh McCafferty, Ernest Miller, and August Johnson.

H. S. Meyers continued to lease the property for a time, living in the farmhouse with his family.

In January 1897, Eva Bastian went to Rock Island County court to have her and her daughters’ surnames changed to Johnson (her maiden name). The family continued to live with Eva’s parents until she married Frank S. Foote in 1898.

Carrie Bastian never married. She died in New Mexico in 1964.

The Bastian farm continued to yield clues for many more years. In 1899, the remains of Ernest Miller were found on the property and identified. In December 1901, tenant William Hoffman uncovered a skeleton while digging a hole for an ice house post. Authorities concluded that the remains were that of a young man who had been killed in cold weather, as the heavy winter sock on his foot attested. Also, his skull had been crushed by four blows to the left side of the head. Surely a familiar set of clues.

Upon hearing this, Mrs. Hoffman declared the farm and farmhouse haunted and quickly left. According to reports, her husband followed soon after.

Today, the area that was the Bastian farm is now a wooded neighborhood just east of Camden Park in Milan.

capture-milan-today

Milan, Illinois present day from http://ims.rockislandcounty.org/website/parcels_public/Viewer.asp. The area that once was the Bastian farm is highlighted in yellow.

One final thought on the story of Henry Bastian: At the April 1896 inquest, his sister Carrie was asked if she thought it was strange that so many of her brother’s hired men simply left the farm without a word to anyone.

“No,” she replied, stating that the same thing had happened during her childhood when her father ran the farm.

(posted by Amy D.)

Sources:

Davenport Daily Leader, April 5, 1896. Pg. 5.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 7, 1896. Pg. 5.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 8, 1896. Pg. 3.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 10, 1896. Pg. 4.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 13, 1896. Pg. 8.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 14, 1896. Pg. 8.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 15, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 16, 1896. Pg. 8.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 21, 1896. Pg. 14.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 28, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Daily Republican, April 29, 1896. Pg. 7

Davenport Daily Leader, April 29, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Daily Leader, April 30, 1896. Pg. 4.

Davenport Weekly Leader, September 1, 1896. Pg. 5.

The Burlington Hawk-Eye, January 29, 1897. Pg. 6.

Davenport Daily Leader, December 6, 1901. Pg. 7.

The Des Moines Leader, December 15, 1901. Pg. 15.

Cedar Rapids Daily Republican, December 17, 1901. Pg. 3.

Ancestry.com

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Henry Bastian: A serial murderer among us – Part I http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/28/henry-bastian-a-serial-murderer-among-us-part-i/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/28/henry-bastian-a-serial-murderer-among-us-part-i/ Fri, 28 Oct 2016 12:29:29 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections When 21-year-old Frederick Kuschmann was found dead on the evening of February 29, 1896, in Black Hawk Township near Milan, Illinois, it appeared to have been a tragic accident. His body was found along a local roadside by his employer, Henry … Continue reading

When 21-year-old Frederick Kuschmann was found dead on the evening of February 29, 1896, in Black Hawk Township near Milan, Illinois, it appeared to have been a tragic accident. His body was found along a local roadside by his employer, Henry Bastian, after Mr. Kuschmann’s horse had returned to the Bastian farm without a rider late that night.

Mr. Kuschmann had been working as a hired hand on the Bastian farm under a one-year contract. February 29th had been the last day of his employment. When asked by the authorities, Henry Bastian stated that on that day he had paid the young man $79 in wages owed and watched him ride off to visit his family in South Rock Island. Kuschmann was to return the next day with a wagon to collect his belongings at Mr. Bastian’s suggestion (Henry’s sister, Carrie, was in the kitchen bathing at the end of the day, which prevented young Frederick from entering the house). Mr. Bastian also stated that the horse on which Frederick left seemed irritable and hard to control.

Upon finding the body, Mr. Bastian immediately sought assistance. Dr. Eddy of Milan, IL was called upon and later reported there was nothing he could do for Frederick. A Coroner’s Inquest held on March 2nd returned a verdict of accidental death. Poor Frederick Kuschmann was likely thrown from his horse.

Not everyone agreed with the verdict.

On March 3rd, the family of Mr. Kuschmann made it known they did not feel this was an accident. Mr. Bastian had stated Mr. Kuschmann rode off with $79, but only a few silver coins were found at the scene. Also, Frederick’s head was severely bruised and cut with no other signs of trauma to the body. That did not seem to fit with being thrown from a horse.

The family demanded further investigation into the matter. It most certainly was not an accident; they believed Mr. Kuschmann had been the victim of a robbery and assault for his wages.

Authorities began to look into the case again. It probably did not hurt the Kuschmann family that Frederick’s uncle was a former alderman in the city of Rock Island and knew many local officials.

It soon became apparent that the death of Frederick Kuschmann was not an accident. But who would do something so horrific?

It brought to mind a recent event that had left people puzzled. Two nights before Mr. Kuschmann’s death, farmer William McLaughlin’s barn had been set on fire. The elderly Mr. McLaughlin remained in the farmhouse while others went to extinguish the flames.

In the midst of the commotion, an unknown man entered McLaughlin’s house and began to go through the family’s parlor. McLaughlin surprised him and he ran off. The family was rumored to have kept a large amount of money in the house; the man was probably after it. Because the Bastian farm adjoined the McLaughlins’ to the southwest, many people believed the same man had committed both crimes and was now on the loose.

On March 7th, the Rock Island County Board of Supervisors issued a reward of $500 for the capture of Frederick Kuschmann’s murderer. Rumors ran rampant as the police worked to solve the case.

The murder and fire even caught the attention of the much larger Chicago Tribune newspaper. Citizens on both sides of the Mississippi River were on edge, wondering where this fiend would strike next.

By March 13th, rumors were circulating that Mr. Kuschmann had not been murdered on the roadside. Evidence suggested he had been attacked elsewhere, his coat wrapped around his head, and he was then driven to the spot where his body was placed. His bloody but undamaged coat was found a short distance away.

More and more, locals began to wonder if Frederick Kuschmann ever left the Bastian farm alive.

Henry Bastian was a 26-year-old married farmer with one young child and another on the way. He had taken over the family farm from his parents, Christian and Catharina, a few years before. His older sister was also staying with the family at the time, as his wife Eva was expected to soon give birth.

The police began to question the Bastian family about Mr. Kuschmann’s last day at the farm. Eva Bastian had been sent by her husband to visit her parents that afternoon, and was not at home when Mr. Kuschmann was paid and left for the night. Henry’s sister Carrie claimed to have been in the bath and also did not see Mr. Kuschmann leave. As for Mr. Bastian, he never wavered from his original account.

The police soon learned that Henry was in financial trouble. They also began to suspect that he had forged his father and wife’s names to mortgage the farm. And then…

Early on the morning of March 13, 1896, the body of Henry Bastian was found in the granary of the farm. He had committed suicide.

He was buried on March 15th (his 27th birthday) in Chippianock Cemetery. Only a few days later, his wife would give birth to a little girl.

Mrs. Bastian never returned to the farm after her husband’s funeral. Instead, she chose to move in with her parents in nearby Rock Island. Carrie Bastian returned to live with her mother in Geneseo, IL (her father had passed away a few months before), and the old family farm was left empty.

The question had been raised in some community members’ minds: Could financial loss have so overwhelmed Henry Bastian that he killed Frederick Kuschmann instead of paying him the wages he was owed?

When authorities went to the farm after Henry’s death, they quickly discovered the truth. Area residents then learned just how wrong they had been about their well-respected neighbor.

Part II of this blog will be printed on October 31, 2016

(posted by Amy D.)

Sources:

Davenport Daily Republican, March 3, 1896. Pg. 6.

Davenport Daily Republican, March 6, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Daily Republican, March 7, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Daily Republican, March 13, 1896. Pg. 7.

Davenport Leader, March 13, 1896. Pg. 12.

Findagrave.com.

Ancestrylibrary.com.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Congratulations to the Hickory Garden Restaurant! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/26/congratulations-to-the-hickory-garden-restaurant/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/26/congratulations-to-the-hickory-garden-restaurant/ Wed, 26 Oct 2016 11:42:07 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections While we usually blog about restaurants of the past, we wanted to take a moment to celebrate a local eatery that is part of the recent past and still going strong in the present! Davenport’s Mayor and City Council Honor … Continue reading

While we usually blog about restaurants of the past, we wanted to take a moment to celebrate a local eatery that is part of the recent past and still going strong in the present!

Davenport’s Mayor and City Council Honor Hickory Garden Restaurant Tonight!

Congratulations to Davenport’s latest small business honoree Hickory Garden Family Restaurant. Owner Nick Fazliu established this gem in 1993 according to a Leader newspaper ad in August of 1997. Located at 3311 Hickory Grove Road in Davenport, the family eatery has often been featured in the Quad City Times as consistently having an extensive menu of terrific food, excellent customer service and great prices.

Davenport City Directories record the restaurant consistently employs 20-22 people. Adjectives used to describe the restaurant and banquet room in news clippings include fantastic, pleasant, choice, friendly and tops!

We salute the folks who make this small business one of the best in Davenport!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
100 Years Ago Today at the Davenport Public Library http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/20/100-years-ago-today-at-the-davenport-public-library/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/20/100-years-ago-today-at-the-davenport-public-library/ Thu, 20 Oct 2016 18:20:31 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Join us this evening to celebrate the vibrancy of Downtown Davenport at our special after-hours event Third Thursday@Davenport Public Library. We will be launching a new program in connection with the Downtown Davenport Partnership: DPL Perks! Show your library card to get … Continue reading

Join us this evening to celebrate the vibrancy of Downtown Davenport at our special after-hours event Third Thursday@Davenport Public Library. We will be launching a new program in connection with the Downtown Davenport Partnership: DPL Perks! Show your library card to get discounts at participating local businesses.

One hundred years ago today, on October 20th, 1916, the library took part in another type of celebration: Iowa Day, the seventieth anniversary of statehood. This was observed with “an exhibit of pictures of early Davenport, loaned by J. B. Hostetler…” said the Davenport Daily Times:

viewscan_0000

Hostetler is a well-known name to us here at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center. We are the fortunate caretakers of  a collection of portrait photography from his studio on 212 West 3rd Street in Davenport, containing images that date from 1895 to 1920.  A Downtown Davenport business, just like our current neighbors here on Main Street.

We are curious to find out which “works of Iowa authors” were also exhibited, though we know for certain what new books were purchased for the library in October, 2016 –they were announced in that very same issue of the Times:

viewscan_0002

viewscan_0003

It is unlikely that you’d find any of these titles in the RiverShare catalog today, but it’s fascinating to note the interest in the topics of war and democracy in the midst of the Great War. Explore the RSSC Center’s newspaper collections on microfilm or online to find out more about life in Davenport a century ago.

posted by Katie

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
A Snapshot of Cook’s Point http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/13/a-snapshot-of-cooks-point/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2016/10/13/a-snapshot-of-cooks-point/ Thu, 13 Oct 2016 10:43:17 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We recently received a donation of pictures purchased at Estate Sales. One of the photographs shows homes in Cook’s Point. Earlier this year, we were also fortunate to receive a donation of items used at former resident’s reunions, including a hand drawn map with … Continue reading

We recently received a donation of pictures purchased at Estate Sales. One of the photographs shows homes in Cook’s Point. Earlier this year, we were also fortunate to receive a donation of items used at former resident’s reunions, including a hand drawn map with key. Together, these items give us a glimpse into the lives of Mexican Immigrants in Davenport .

2016-cookspoint01

Cook’s Point 1950

cookspoint

Acc#2016-12 Cook’s Point Collection

We used the 1940 Federal Census and the Davenport City Directories between 1932 – 1945 to verify the names of identified residents.

1 Morales, Salud (620 S Howell St.)
2 Jiminez, Agapito / Hernandez, Bartolo / Martinez, Frank
3 Bishop, Robert  / Torres, Cesario / Almanza, Fred
4 Ruiz, Beatrice / Lopez, John
5 Ramirez, Ysidro / Almanza, Federico “Fred”
6 Holly Rollers / Arguello, Rafael / Chapman, William
7 Juarez, Ignacio “Nacho” / Gomez, Peter
8 Garcia, Albert
9 Reyes, Nick
10 Hidalgo, Lorenzo
11 Hayes, John “Jack”
12 Terronez / Moreno, Antonio
13 Garcia, Porfiro
14 Mares, Aurelio
15 Juarez, Carmen / Hernandez, Bartolo
16 Franco, Manuel
17 School House
18 Terronez, Philip
19 Nache, Socorro
20 Ybarra, Raphael
21 Martinez, Frank / Lopez, Archie
22 Vasques, Micaela / Gutierrez, Trinidad (602 S Howell St.)
23 Chandler, Ray
24 Herrera, Basacelia “Bacha”
25 Hadley, John / Delgado, Pedro
26 Vasquez, Maximo
27 Pruess, Max
28 Herrera, Mariano
29 Herrera, Rosario
30 Serrano, John / Hernandez, Jacinto
31 Peterson or Patterson, John / Reyes, Manuel
32 Vasquez
33 Reyes, Philip
34 Hicks / Ramirez, Pete
35 Reyes, Nick / Mendez, Jesse
36 Gutierrez, Jesse
37 Ramirez, Dionicio “Nicho”
38 Quijas, Mariana / Peña, Eladio “Lyle”
39 Aguilar, Alfonso
40 Norris, George
41 Vargas, Jose (640 S Howell St.)
42 Juarez, Jose (638 S Howell St.)
43 Rangel, Isaac / Bernal, Peter / Dent, Virgil (632 S Howell St.)
44 Juarez, Joe (610 S Howell St.)
45 Gutierrez, Trinidad
46 Herrera, Delfino
47 Vasquez, Bridget / Magana, Maria (637 S Howell St.)
48 Vasquez, Jose / Winfield, Bob (635 S Howell St.)
49 Reyes, Phillip / Solano, Pete
50 Lopez, Fred (631 S Howell St.)
51 Castel, David
52 Bohnhoff, Fred “Fritz”
53 Tutor, Harold
54 Hoffman, Otto
55 Button Factory
56 Aldape, Apolonio
57 Ogden, Frank
58 Solano, Pete
59 Gamble, Edward
60 Puentes, John “Ganzo”
61 Gomez, Peter
62 Garcia, Porfirio / Hubbe, Fred (702 S Howell St.)
63 Rhoades, Delbert / Reyna, Manuel
64 Garcia, Jose
65 Boatman, Charles
66 Quijas, Tirso / Vieth, Helen / Dunklau, Henry
67 Solis, Antonio “Tony”
68 Puentes, John “Ganzo”
69 Valdez, Jose
70 Elias, Selso
71 Ortega, Pedro
72 Johnson, Lucille
73 Wilharber, John / Empke, Fred
74 Peterson, John
75 Rodenberg, Oliver (226 S Howell St.)

For more information about Cook’s Point and other historic Latino neighborhoods in Iowa, visit the fantastic resource, Migration is Beautiful, from the Iowa Women’s Archives at the University of Iowa Libraries.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/
Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/