Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2015 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ The Burning Room http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-burning-room/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-burning-room/ Tue, 28 Jul 2015 08:00:22 -0500 Lynn at Davenport Library Info Cafe The audiobook of Michael Connelly’s latest (hopefully, not the last) Harry Bosch novel is brilliantly narrated by Titus Welliver. The Burning Room is enjoyable on multiple levels. First, there’s the evolving relationship between Harry and an assigned protegee, Detective Lucia Soto, as well as Harry’s internal monologues about the careerists in charge of the LAPD and the incredible talents of […]

Burning RoomThe audiobook of Michael Connelly’s latest (hopefully, not the last) Harry Bosch novel is brilliantly narrated by Titus Welliver. The Burning Room is enjoyable on multiple levels. First, there’s the evolving relationship between Harry and an assigned protegee, Detective Lucia Soto, as well as Harry’s internal monologues about the careerists in charge of the LAPD and the incredible talents of Welliver and, probably least of all, the actual plot.

Bosch grows into an ever more fascinating character; professional in that he cares first and foremost about solving cases, rather than the political implications of each and every action. He skewers the bureaucratic bluster in the guise of the bumptious Lieutenant Samuels, Bosch’s nemesis. As they investigate two entwined cold cases, Harry imparts his survival skills and hard-won knowledge to Lucy Soto, a smart and hard-working disciple. Will she carry the torch in future Connelly books?

There’s a fine balance in audiobooks when it comes to altering the reader’s voice between characters; they should be distinct enough that the listener can follow a conversation, but not so in-your-face that you’re brought out of the story. Welliver’s  gift is his ability to create, with consistent and subtle intonation, a conversation’s back and forth action. So much more efficient than “he said” and “Harry replied,” and “she shouted.”

His narrating work can be heard in several Robert B. Parker novels, while his acting can be seen in The Town, Gone Baby Gone, Twisted and Transformers. Age of Distinction. I’m sure acting is not easy, but reading aloud in such an intelligent and enjoyable manner must be even harder.

 

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New Spirituality and Religion in July http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-spirituality-and-religion-in-july/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-spirituality-and-religion-in-july/ Mon, 27 Jul 2015 08:00:46 -0500 Allison at Davenport Library Info Cafe Featured new additions to DPL’s Spirituality & Religion collections! Click on the book title to place a hold. For more new books, visit our Upcoming Releases page. As always, if you have a book that you would like to recommend, call or email the Reference Department. Anchor and Flares: A Memoir of Motherhood, Hope and Service by Kate Braestrup […]

Featured new additions to DPL’s Spirituality & Religion collections! Click on the book title to place a hold. For more new books, visit our Upcoming Releases page. As always, if you have a book that you would like to recommend, call or email the Reference Department.

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Anchor and Flares: A Memoir of Motherhood, Hope and Service by Kate Braestrup – Kate Braestrup’s life was transformed by the loss of her husband; now Kate faces the possibility that she may lose her son. As a young mother Kate Braestrup discovered the fierce protectiveness that accompanies parenthood. In the intervening years–through mourning her husband and the joy of remarriage and a blended family-Kate has absorbed the rewards and complications of that spirit. But when her eldest son joins the Marines, Kate is at a crossroads: Can she reconcile her desire to protect her children with her family’s legacy of service? Can parents balance the joy of a child’s independence with the fear of letting go?
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Destiny: Step Into Your Purpose by T. D. Jakes – Jakes, author of more than 25 books and “bishop” of the popular nondenominational syndicated TV show the Potter’s Touch, builds on his previous works in this conversational sermon, proposing a framework for readers to discover their purpose and achieve their full potential. According to Jakes, we are all placed on the Earth for a specific purpose that can only be discovered by listening to our instincts. In this book, he takes the next step: “Instinct must merge with purpose to find Destiny.”
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St Paul: The Apostle we Love to Hate by Karen Armstrong – St. Paul is known throughout the world as the first Christian writer, authoring fourteen of the twenty-seven books in the New Testament. But as Karen Armstrong demonstrates in “St. Paul: The Apostle We Love to Hate,” he also exerted a more significant influence on the spread of Christianity throughout the world than any other figure in history. While we know little about some aspects of the life of St. Paul–his upbringing, the details of his death–his dramatic vision of God on the road to Damascus is one of the most powerful stories in the history of Christianity, and the life that followed forever changed the course of history.
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Approaching the End of Life: A Practical and Spiritual Guide – From making a will and planning a memorial service to finding peace in the toughest circumstances, Donna Schaper offers practical and spiritual guidance to anyone wrestling with the end of a life. With sensitivity and humor she helps readers face ageing and mortality with freedom rather than fear, encourages readers to find a spiritual home of some kind, and offers helpful suggestions on memorials and funeral services that will be well suited to the departed while also serving the loved ones in their grief and celebration.
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One Thousand Wells: How an Audacious Goal Taught Me to Love the World Instead of Save It by Jena Lee Nardella –  Ten years ago, Jena Lee Nardella was a fresh-out-of-college, twenty-something with the lofty goal of truly changing the world. Armed with a diploma, a thousand dollars, and a dream to build one thousand wells in Africa, she joined forces with the band Jars of Clay to found Blood:Water and begin her mission. But along the way she faced many harsh realities that have tested her faith, encountered corruption and brokenness that nearly destroyed everything she’d fought for, and taught her that wishful thinking will not get you very far. Jena discovered that true change comes only when you stop trying to save the world and allow yourself to love it, even when it breaks your heart.
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Relax, It’s Just God: How and Why to Talk to Your Kids about Religion When You’re Not Religious by Wendy T. Russell – A rapidly growing demographic cohort in America, non-religious parents are at the forefront of a major and unprecedented cultural shift. Unable to fall back on what they were taught as children, many of these parents are struggling–or simply failing–to address complicated religious questions and issues with their children in ways that promote curiosity, kindness, and independence. Author Wendy Thomas Russell sifts through hard data–including the results of her own survey of 1,000 nonreligious parents–and delivers gentle but straightforward advice to this often-overlooked segment of the American population.
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Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims by Scott Kugle and Siraj Al-Haqq – Living Out Islam documents the rarely-heard voices of Muslims who live in secular democratic countries and who are gay, lesbian, and transgender. It weaves original interviews with Muslim activists into a compelling composite picture which showcases the importance of the solidarity of support groups in the effort to change social relationships and achieve justice. This nascent movement is not about being out as opposed to being in the closet. Rather, as the voices of these activists demonstrate, it is about finding ways to live out Islam with dignity and integrity, reconciling their sexuality and gender with their faith and reclaiming Islam as their own.
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Great Iowa Traditions: Bix 7 Race and RAGBRAI http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/24/6298/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/24/6298/ Fri, 24 Jul 2015 11:43:13 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Two great Iowa traditions, one local and one statewide, meet in Davenport this Saturday, July 25th and we are all very excited. The local based event is the Quad City Times Bix 7 Road Race which will start at 8:00 … Continue reading

Two great Iowa traditions, one local and one statewide, meet in Davenport this Saturday, July 25th and we are all very excited.

The local based event is the Quad City Times Bix 7 Road Race which will start at 8:00 a.m. Saturday morning. Started in 1975 with a total of 84 runners this race now involves 12,000 plus participants.

If you are not interested in running or walking 7 miles that morning there are other options as well. You may volunteer, join the crowds along the route to cheer on participants, or visit the street fair in downtown Davenport. This amazing tradition is 41 years strong in 2015.

A few years ago we published a bit of information on another foot race up the steep hills of Davenport. It seems our 1858 citizens viewed the hills as a challenge too.

The second event in Davenport this Saturday is the end of the Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa which is more commonly known as RAGBRAI.

Started in 1973 by the Des Moines Register newspaper, this event starts somewhere in western Iowa along the Missouri or Big Sioux Rivers. This seven day non-competitive bicycle ride takes participants across Iowa via a planned route that ends somewhere along the Mississippi River.

Traditionally participants dip their rear bike wheels in the Missouri River or Big Sioux River before starting out and their front wheels in the Mississippi River upon completion. The dipping spot this year for participants will be Credit Island as Davenport is once again pleased to be the ending spot for this great ride.

One of the RAGBRAI participants has chosen a special recognition for Davenport. A police officer with the Iowa State University Police Department is riding in honor of Davenport Police Officer Michael Farnsworth who died in the line of duty on December 5, 1971. We wish this officer and all RAGBRAI participants a safe journey as they travel to Davenport.

The wonderful part of Saturday is you will be able to join the Bix 7 race (either as a participant, volunteer, or sidelines cheering section) in the morning, stop by Credit Island to welcome RAGBRAI riders in the afternoon (and see the wheel dipping celebration), and still have time for street festivities in downtown Davenport in the evening.

And don’t forget to add to your calendars the Bix Porch Party next Thursday, July 30th from 11:00 – 1:00 outside the Davenport Public Library – Main Street Branch. This event helps kick off the 44th Annual Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival which will run from July 30th – August 2nd in downtown Davenport at the Davenport River Center and other downtown venues.

So come join us in Davenport and be a part of the festivities!

 

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The Sunday New York Times Book Review http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-sunday-new-york-times-book-review/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-sunday-new-york-times-book-review/ Fri, 24 Jul 2015 08:00:17 -0500 Lynn at Davenport Library Info Cafe More often than not, the Sunday New York Times Book Review contains a passage that you wish you’d written, or that you’d like to save somewhere to inspire yourself about the importance of books, reading and libraries. For example, this was part of a July 5th interview with Anthony Doerr. By the Book is a recurring feature […]

NYTimesBookReviewMore often than not, the Sunday New York Times Book Review contains a passage that you wish you’d written, or that you’d like to save somewhere to inspire yourself about the importance of books, reading and libraries.

For example, this was part of a July 5th interview with Anthony Doerr. By the Book is a recurring feature in which writers are quizzed about their reading life. Here’s an excerpt:

“Have you ever gotten in trouble for reading a book?

Gosh, I’m not sure. Last year I bought an Eliot Weinberger essay collection to my son’s lacrosse practice and took a wayward ball to the shin because I was sitting too close to the field. I did read “The Sheltering Sky” when I was 11 or 12 years old. (“Mom, what’s hashish?) But I don’t think I got in trouble for it.  On the contrary, I was incredibly blessed because neither my mother nor the local librarians ever said ‘This is outside your age range, Tony.  You can’t handle this.’  They trusted us to make our own paths through books  and that’s very, very empowering.”

From Anthony Doerr: By the Book, New York Times, p. 8, July 5, 2015.

Or sometimes, it hits a little close to home. To quote Judd Apatow:

“My buying-to-actually reading ratio is 387 to 1. …I have actually convinced myself that buying books is the same as reading…”

This is in answer to the question: “Whom do you consider the best writers – novelists, essayists, critics, journalists, poets – working today?,” he says, “I am the last person you should ask because I don’t read that much.”

From Judd Apatow: By the Book, New York Times, p. 7, June 14, 2015

I intend to browse through back issues at the Main library, and look for Carl Hiaasen, Neil Gaiman, Anne Lamott, Alain de Botton, Marilynne Robinson, and Michael Connelly, among others (you can also browse the archives online to see a list of featured authors).  These are folks that I’m guessing are going to be both witty and not so very full of themselves.

So, how would you answer the By the Book questionnaire?

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New Science Fiction and Fantasy in July http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-science-fiction-and-fantasy-in-july/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-science-fiction-and-fantasy-in-july/ Thu, 23 Jul 2015 08:00:02 -0500 Allison at Davenport Library Info Cafe Featured new additions to DPL’s Science Fiction and Fantasy collections! Click on the title to place a hold. For more new books, visit our Upcoming Releases page. Armada by Ernest Cline – Struggling to complete his final month of high school only to glimpse a UFO that exactly resembles an enemy ship from his favorite […]

Featured new additions to DPL’s Science Fiction and Fantasy collections! Click on the title to place a hold. For more new books, visit our Upcoming Releases page.

armada Armada by Ernest Cline – Struggling to complete his final month of high school only to glimpse a UFO that exactly resembles an enemy ship from his favorite video game, Zack questions his sanity before becoming one of millions of gamers tasked with protecting the Earth during an alien invasion.
scalzi The End of All Things by John Scalzi – The sequel to The Human Division finds Colonial Defense Forces lieutenant Harry Wilson investigating a series of alien attacks that are threatening Earth’s survivors and an increasingly under-sourced Colonial Union.
ghost Ghost Fleet by P.W. Singer and August Cole – The United States, China, and Russia eye each other across a twenty-first century version of the Cold War, which suddenly heats up at sea, on land, in the air, in outer space, and in cyberspace. The fighting involves everything from stealthy robotic–drone strikes to old warships from the navy’s “ghost fleet.” Ultimately, victory will depend on blending the lessons of the past with the weapons of the future.
mirror The Mirror Empire by Kameron Hurley – Forced into a mirror universe as soldiers overran her village, Lilia, the orphan of a blood witch, begins making unsettling discoveries about her past and the nature of the dark star Oma, which has not been seen for two thousand years.
22381326 Half a War by Joe Abercrombie – Princess Skara has seen all she loved made blood and ashes. She is left with only words. But the right words can be as deadly as any blade. The deep-cunning Father Yarvi has walked a long road from crippled slave to king’s minister. He has made allies of old foes and stitched together an uneasy peace. But now the ruthless Grandmother Wexen has raised the greatest army since the elves made war on God, and put Bright Yilling at its head – a man who worships no god but Death. But when Mother War spreads her iron wings, she may cast the whole Shattered Sea into darkness.
moments Three Moments of an Explosion: Stories by China Mieville – London awakes one morning to find itself besieged by a sky full of floating icebergs. Destroyed oil rigs, mysteriously reborn, clamber from the sea and onto the land, driven by an obscure but violent purpose. An anatomy student cuts open a cadaver to discover impossibly intricate designs carved into a corpse’s bones designs clearly present from birth, bearing mute testimony to . . . what? Of such concepts and unforgettable images are made the twenty-eight stories in this collection many published here for the first time.
smug The Good, the Bad and the Smug by Tom Holt – Mordak isn’t bad, as far as goblin kings go, but when someone, or something, starts pumping gold into the human kingdoms it puts his rule into serious jeopardy. Suddenly he’s locked in an arms race with a species whose arms he once considered merely part of a calorie-controlled diet. Helped by an elf with a background in journalism and a masters degree in being really pleased with herself, Mordak sets out to discover what on earth (if indeed, that’s where he is) is going on. He knows that the truth is out there. If only he could remember where he put it.
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New CDs for July http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-cds-for-july/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/new-cds-for-july/ Wed, 22 Jul 2015 08:00:36 -0500 Bill at Davenport Library Info Cafe Chemical Brothers — Born in the Echoes The Grammy Winning Chemical Brothers return with their first album in five years and quickly remind fans of their influence and importance.     Finger Eleven — Five Crooked Lines Finger Eleven prepares to release their seventh studio album, which is also their first new full-length in five […]

Chemical Brothers — Born in the Echoes

The Grammy Winning Chemical Brothers return with their first album in five years and quickly remind fans of their influence and importance.

 

 

Finger Eleven — Five Crooked Lines

Finger Eleven prepares to release their seventh studio album, which is also their first new full-length in five years. Immediate, urgent, and unfiltered, it expresses the exultant spirit of rock n’ roll.
Buddy Guy — Born to Play Guitar

Legendary blues icon Buddy Guy returns with the follow-up to his 2013 album, Rhythm and Blues. Joining him here are such guests as Van Morrison, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, Joss Stone, and Kim Wilson.

 

 


Jason Isbell — Something More Than Free

Jason Isbell returns with the follow-up to his acclaimed 2013 album Southeastern. In an interview with Rolling Stone, he stated that this release will be less dark. It also includes the track 24 Frames.
Alan Jackson — Angels and Alcohol

Country superstar Alan Jackson returns with his first new studio album in three years. It also marks 25 years since he released his debut album. Jackson had a hand in writing seven of the album’s ten tracks.
Owl City — Mobile Orchestra

Owl City, the artist behind hits like Fireflies, is back with his fifth album. The first single, Verge, features vocals from Aloe Blacc. There are also appearances from Hanson and country star Jake Owen.

 

 

Joss Stone — Water For Your Soul

Soulful singer Joss Stone returns with her first new album since 2012’s The Soul Sessions, Vol. 2. Includes the tracks The Answer; Stuck On You; and Let Me Breathe.

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The Dreaded Summer Slide http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-dreaded-summer-slide/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-dreaded-summer-slide/ Tue, 21 Jul 2015 08:00:51 -0500 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe Since we’re deep in the midst of summer vacation and hopefully none of the kids that you know are stuck in summer school, everyone is free to explore and run and, most importantly, not have to worry about getting up early and going to school. This break brings a conundrum to light as both parents and […]

Since we’re deep in the midst of summer vacation and hopefully none of the kids that you know are stuck in summer school, everyone is free to explore and run and, most importantly, not have to worry about getting up early and going to school. This break brings a conundrum to light as both parents and teachers begin to worry about the summer slide, also known as the time when kids start forgetting the important things they learned in the school year while they are on summer vacation.

How do we, as educators, parents, librarians, babysitters, etc, combat this? By making learning fun. Sure, we could bring home big tomes from the library and tell our kids that they have to read a certain set of pages before they can go outside and play, but the resulting struggle will instead leave everyone frustrated and angry and wishing they had something to bash their heads against. Let me help you avoid the agony and present you with some exciting and less injurious options. Let’s focus today’s blog post on history and alternative methods of learning, shall we? Read on!


hip-hop us historyI don’t know about you, but my difficulties in remembering things in school, and especially over summer vacation, always revolved around history. Blurgh. Textbooks made me fall asleep, I was always mixing dates around in my head, and THEN I discovered Hip-Hop U.S. History: The New and Innovative Approach to Learning American History. (I had found other similar works, not by the same authors, ranging from mixing poetry and music to math and music, but this, by far, was my favorite.) Blake Harrison and Alex Rappaport created Flocabulary, a website for teachers and school districts to find ways to teach anything ranging from social studies to languages arts to math and science to kids of all ages, but I particularly enjoyed this book. Number 1 reason: It has a CD of all the songs inside of it AND has an actual list of the lyrics! Each song has its own dedicated chapter with the lyrics broken down and explained in better detail. Be still your heart if you think this book is still boring. It’s not! Pictures are also added with quotations from that time period, perspectives pieces, and little biographies of the important people. You learn without actually realizing you’re learning! (And you’ll also have a few catchy songs stuck in your head to help you remember those pesky dates and important historical details!)


crashcourse

Let me share with you my most delightful learning find. This is the Crash Course YouTube channel, put together by none other that John Green, his lovely brother Hank, and two of their friends, Phil Plait and Craig Benzine. If these names sound familiar, yay! If not, let me introduce you to John Green, a writer of young adult books with works such as The Fault in Our Stars, An Abundance of Katherines, Paper Towns, Looking for Alaska, and Will Grayson, Will Grayson. He and his brother, Hank Green, also have another YouTube channel called Vlogbrothers, where they send videos to each other, but these are far less about learning, so let’s focus on Crash Course. Here you will find videos on literature, ecology, biology, world history, US history, chemistry, and psychology, and many more. I got hooked on the literature ones, where John discusses anything from authors to books to poetry and adds his own unique spin. Each video is animated and punch filled with learning and facts and humor and keeps you on the edge of your seat wanting to learn more. I highly recommend you check them out for yourself and let me know what you think in the comments below.


This blog post gives you a glimmer of some of the things I’ve found that have helped with my own learning. I’ve got more ideas rolling around in my head, so keep checking back. If you’re looking for different ways to engage the kids you know or are maybe curious for yourself about new ways to learn old things, contact us at the library and we’d be glad to help you!

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July 20th is Moon Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/july-20th-is-moon-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/july-20th-is-moon-day/ Mon, 20 Jul 2015 08:00:21 -0500 Rachel at Davenport Library Info Cafe On July 20, 1969, man landed on the Moon for the first time.  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first two human beings to step onto the Moon and they spent two and a half hours on the surface of the Moon. During that time, Armstrong and Aldrin took pictures, did experiments and collected 46 […]

full_apollo11On July 20, 1969, man landed on the Moon for the first time.  Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin were the first two human beings to step onto the Moon and they spent two and a half hours on the surface of the Moon. During that time, Armstrong and Aldrin took pictures, did experiments and collected 46 pounds of Moon rocks.  They left behind an American Flag, a patch honoring the crew of Apollo 1 and a plaque.  The plaque reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon. July 1969. We came in peace for all mankind”.

NASA had been challenged by President Kennedy to put a man on the Moon before the decade was out and NASA met that challenge. The Moon landing was a great technological achievement, perhaps the greatest achievement in human history.

 

New MoonIf you are interested in learning more about the Moon, check out The New Moon: Water, Exploration and Future Habitation by Arlin Crotts.  Crotts is a professor of astronomy at Columbia University. This book explores the history of exploration on the Moon and discusses discoveries that are being uncovered.  It is the complete story of mankind and the lunar experience.  Crotts presents little-known, but significant events in lunar science for the first time.  He also explains the environment on the Moon and the possibility of making the Moon habitable for humans.

The Davenport Public Library owns many more books about the Moon!  To learn more, visit any one of our locations.  Most books about the Moon are located at 523.3 in the non-fiction section of the library.

Did you know that you can read newspaper articles about the moon landing from 1969?  Go to http://access.newspaperarchive.com/ and search for “moon landing”.

 

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Myths vs. Facts: The Life and Death of Schuyler Peck http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/18/myths-vs-facts-the-life-and-death-of-schuyler-peck/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/18/myths-vs-facts-the-life-and-death-of-schuyler-peck/ Sat, 18 Jul 2015 17:01:42 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections An obituary for Schuyler Peck was published in the Davenport Democrat and Leader on July 14, 1925. Mr. Peck was a well known character in Davenport, but he died alone at the Scott County Poor Farm, with no immediate family to … Continue reading

An obituary for Schuyler Peck was published in the Davenport Democrat and Leader on July 14, 1925. Mr. Peck was a well known character in Davenport, but he died alone at the Scott County Poor Farm, with no immediate family to mourn him or provide information about his life.

An article published the next day gives a more complete obituary, with stories told by Fred Kendell, an old friend of Mr. Peck. And on July 20th a “W.H.H.” wrote a letter to the editor, giving some background of Mr. Peck’s family life and his relationship with his mother.

The stories piqued our interest so we did some investigating, using our available sources to try to separate fact from fiction.

The newspaper writers were not sure if that was his real name or just a nickname. We found several sources that list his name as “Schuyler C. Peck”, son of Thomas F. and Elizabeth (Gates) Peck. The 1880 Census lists him as “Charles”, which may have been his middle name.

His friend Fred Kendell said that Schuyler had been born “on Front Street, between Perry and Rock Island Streets”. The Census for 1860, 1870, 1880 and 1885 and an 1890 marriage record all list his birthplace as “Indiana”, same as his mother’s. But the 1915 Census lists his birthplace as “Iowa”. Both parents were living in Davenport at the time of the 1856 Census but the family had moved to Jo Daviess Co. Illinois by the 1860 Census. It is possible that his parents went back to Indiana in the late 1850’s and then moved to Illinois shortly after he was born.

Mr. Kendell then says that Schuyler’s parents moved to Perry Street, above Fourth Street, almost directly across from Burtis Opera House. The Census for 1880 and 1885, and the Davenport City Directory for 1888 all list their address as 420 Perry Street.

The letter to the editor from July 20th talks a lot about Schuyler’s mother, who ran “Peck’s Eating House” on Perry Street. The 1888 Davenport City Directory lists Thomas F. Peck as the proprietor of the R.R. Eating House, located at 418-422 Perry Street.

Mr. Kendell claims that Schuyler lost both parents at age 15. According to Scott County Probate Records, his mother Elizabeth died on April 25, 1891 and his father Thomas died on May 10, 1892, when Schuyler was an adult over 31 years of age.

They claimed that a “distant relative” had died and left him a large inheritance, which he spent on fancy clothes. A check of the Scott County Probate Records shows that his father Thomas died in May of 1892 and Schuyler, his only heir, received $1,333.80 on September 18, 1893.

The newspaper writers list his occupation as “expressman” and hack driver”, and his friend Fred Kendell says Schuyler took a job as a brakeman on the Rock Island Lines. A check of Davenport City Directories and Federal & State Census give his occupation as clerk at W. A. Philips Feed Store (1880), brakeman for the C R I & P (1881), a R. R. employee (1885), baggageman for C R I & P (1888) and laborer for H E Winters Specialty Co. (1920) and Peterson Oil Co. (1921).

His obituary says that he joined Ringling Bros circus as a Hayseed Clown before moving back to Davenport. Schuyler does not appear in the Davenport City Directories in the 1890’s. At the time of his father’s death in 1892 his whereabouts were unknown and it was thought he was residing in Cedar Rapids. There is a marriage record in Council Bluffs between Schuyler C. Peck, son of Thomas & Elizabeth, and Elizabeth A. Axtell, daughter of Alfred and Louisa. He does not appear in the Davenport City Directories again until 1906. We haven’t been able to verify the circus clown story, but if he did join the circus, it was likely sometime in the 1890’s.

Schuyler Peck was known to frequent an area of Davenport known as “Buck Town”, where he spent his leisure and working hours delivering to dance halls, saloons and gambling halls. We found a newspaper article in the Rock Island Argus about an arrest in a barn at the rear of the “old Friendly House on East Second Street”, where he and 12 other had been picked up by police for drinking and charged with being inmates of a disorderly house. The Davenport Police Blotter for August 3, 1913 lists him as being 5’8 with dark complexion and his occupation as a laborer.

Another interesting newspaper notice was published in the Davenport Daily Leader on December 13, 1891. It says that “Mrs. Schuyler Peck” who ran the “den” on Front Street, was arrested shortly before midnight. A check of the Davenport Police Matron Reports for December 1891 lists “Mrs. May Peck”, age 35, charged with “keeping a house of ill fame”. We’re not if May was really married to Schuyler or not. She had a few more run ins with the law, so look for a future blog post from us about Mrs. Peck’s adventures.

We hope this serves as a reminder to not believe everything you read in the newspapers. And that we have primary sources available to help verify or debunk these fantastic tales.

 

(posted by Cristina)

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Here by Richard McGuire http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/here-by-richard-mcguire/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/here-by-richard-mcguire/ Fri, 17 Jul 2015 08:00:05 -0500 Allison at Davenport Library Info Cafe Here by Richard McGuire is a deceptively simple book. It follows one particular room of one particular home and show us what happens there, from the distant past and into the far future. The occupants (if there were occupants) or whatever is there at that particular moment are captured in a single frame, each frame layered […]

978-0-375-40650-8Here by Richard McGuire is a deceptively simple book. It follows one particular room of one particular home and show us what happens there, from the distant past and into the far future. The occupants (if there were occupants) or whatever is there at that particular moment are captured in a single frame, each frame layered on top of another in seemingly random order. The space we watch was not always a house, nor will it be always be. The house itself has a limited lifespan, as do whatever and whoever was and will be there.

The pages themselves are not immediately recognizable as a narrative story. But, after a while, a story does emerge. Flipping back and forth, following the years in or out of order, there is a sense of both impermanence and of the enduring. It’s not a heavy-handed lesson, nor is this book one to page through quickly.

McGuire first used this concept in 1989 in a 36-panel comic also titled “Here.” Some of the panels are available to the public temporarily via The Way Back Machine, and the full comic was published in the 2006 “An Anthology of Graphic Fiction, Cartoons, and True Stories,” edited by Ivan Brunetti.

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Click to enlarge

 

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Trinity Test and the Manhattan Project http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/trinity-test-and-the-manhattan-project/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/trinity-test-and-the-manhattan-project/ Thu, 16 Jul 2015 08:00:44 -0500 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe July 16, 2015 marks the 70th Anniversary of the Trinity Test. What’s the Trinity Test? This was the first successful test of the atom bomb at the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range in New Mexico. This site was flat and located relatively close to Los Alamos where the bombs were designed and produced. This section of […]

bomb2July 16, 2015 marks the 70th Anniversary of the Trinity Test. What’s the Trinity Test? This was the first successful test of the atom bomb at the Alamogordo Bombing and Gunnery Range in New Mexico. This site was flat and located relatively close to Los Alamos where the bombs were designed and produced. This section of land was given the code-name “Trinity” and thus July 16, 1945 was known as the Trinity Test. (Interesting fact: The Trinity Test Site is open twice a year for visitors, once in April and once in October. This is the article discussing this year’s visits. )

The Manhattan Project was a top-secret research and development project during World War II that produced the first nuclear weapons. President Roosevelt signed the order for the initial research committee in 1942 which eventually went through many iterations to become the core Manhattan Project group. Major General Leslie Groves was put in charge of the project from 1942 to 1946 and was the person who brought on Robert Oppenheimer, a physicist who was the director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, the site that designed the actual bombs.

Secret facilities were popping up all over the country with the express purpose of manufacturing different parts of the bombs, for researching different aspects, and for trying out different methods. Everything was top-secret. Oppenheimer recruited the top scientists in their fields without being able to tell them what exactly they would be working on, except that it had a possibility of helping them end the war.

With so little information to go off of, many scientists packed up their families to move to Los Alamos, where they lived and worked in isolation, not even able to discuss their work within their own families. Everything was kept secret and compartmentalized.


This blog is just an introduction to the Trinity Test and the Manhattan Project. If the description above interested you, check out the resources below.

trinityTrinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb by Jonathan Fetter-Vorm gives a detailed history, not just on the Manhattan Project and the Trinity Test, but the very beginning of atom research, in laboratories of nineteenth-century Europe all the way to the Trinity Test.

This graphic novel goes into incredible detail about all the people involved in the history of the atom and its discovery. While most histories of the atomic bomb tend to focus on and use more scientific terms, Fetter-Vorm is able to include pictures and drawings through the graphic novel format that allow for a better conceptual understanding of a nuclear reaction and how atoms split. Readers are transported into the labs and lives of Major General Leslie Groves, Enrico Fermi, J. Robert Oppenheimer, and the other brilliant scientists who brought to life atomic bombs and ushered in a new era of warfare.

After the successful test of the atomic bomb, Fetter-Vorm then goes on to illustrate the decisions behind the dropping of the bombs on Nagasaki and Hiroshima. This graphic novel is an excellent depiction of what life was like for those directly and indirectly involved in the making of the first atomic bomb.


manhattan season1What initially reminded me of the Trinity Test’s anniversary was when I started watching season one of Manhattan. This television series follows the many scientists as they work to build the world’s first atomic bomb in Los Alamos, New Mexico and the struggles that their families go through moving to the middle of nowhere, being cut off from everyone outside the community, and being kept in the dark about what their family members are doing.

This show really hooked me because in addition to all the science and descriptions of the different models they were building, it also deals with the bureaucracy of this governmental entity, how they have to finagle getting supplies since where they are is only a P.O. Box and not an actual address, and how secrets and gossip run rampant through the entire community, fueling the suspicions that multiple people are spies and that others are committing treason. Tensions run high, both between the individual families and the two different science camps, each competing against the other to have the first successful atomic bomb design and then test.

Check out this television show to gain a better understanding of the complex secrecy of the Manhattan Project and how the segmentation of their lives, in addition to bringing immense tension, in the end allowed work to secretly flourish and bring together an explosive ending.

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Enchanted August http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/enchanted-august/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/enchanted-august/ Wed, 15 Jul 2015 08:00:00 -0500 Lynn at Davenport Library Info Cafe I was well into Enchanted August  before the (admittedly obvious) similarities to Enchanted April impinged upon my consciousness. In both,  several people who’d not be friends in normal circumstances find themselves sharing a vacation home in an idyllic vacation spot. They become better versions of themselves, more generous, open-hearted and kind. Marriages are improved, and friendships fostered. […]

Enchanted AugustI was well into Enchanted August  before the (admittedly obvious) similarities to Enchanted April impinged upon my consciousness. In both,  several people who’d not be friends in normal circumstances find themselves sharing a vacation home in an idyllic vacation spot. They become better versions of themselves, more generous, open-hearted and kind. Marriages are improved, and friendships fostered.

Brenda Bowen’s novel is modeled on The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnin. Published in 1922, it was made into a film in 1992, starring Miranda Richardson and Michael Kitchen.

In Bowen’s novel, Lottie and Rose happen upon an advertisement for a  cottage (in fact, a huge, Victorian house) on Little Lost Island in Maine. They are both at low points in their lives, stressed out about their children, husbands and life in New York City. Like Enchanted April, the desire and the plan take root during a pouring rain. All the better to contrast with the buoyantly sunny skies of Maine and Italy. Caroline Dester (a movie star in Enchanted August and Lady Caroline in Enchanted April) are struggling with the demands of fame and privilege.

The four occupants (the joyously optimistic Lottie, the quieter poet Rose,  beautiful Caroline and eccentric, grieving Beverly) meld into a family of sorts, even as it expands and embraces extended family members.  Maine itself is a character – ever-changing but always exhilarating, working its magic on all who spend time there. The very remoteness of the island (no cell phone service) changes how they go about their days and how they interact with each other and those off the island. There is a charmingly retro vibe to the story and the setting.

If you can’t physically get away this summer, dip into this virtual vacation between two covers, and you’ll feel as refreshed and restored as if you’d actually left your house.

 

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SO CUTE!! Vintage Fejervary Petting Zoo Photos http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/09/so-cute-vintage-fejervary-petting-zoo-photos/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/09/so-cute-vintage-fejervary-petting-zoo-photos/ Thu, 09 Jul 2015 12:55:22 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Mother Goose is once again welcoming children at Fejervary Park. The City of Davenport Parks & Recreation Department will be hosting Family Fun Days at Fejervary Learning Center on the third Saturday of the month. Upcoming dates are July 18, August 15, September 19 and … Continue reading

Mother Goose is once again welcoming children at Fejervary Park.

The City of Davenport Parks & Recreation Department will be hosting Family Fun Days at Fejervary Learning Center on the third Saturday of the month. Upcoming dates are July 18, August 15, September 19 and October 17. They feature family activities including a petting zoo, bounce houses and games.

Mother Goose Land at Fejervary Zoo opened in 1953 and closed in 1979.

These adorable photos came from the City of Davenport Leisure Services & Facilities (now called Parks & Recreation) and are part of our Archive & Manuscript Collections.

Even though the Old West town, Monkey Island, and fairy tale exhibits are no longer; Mother Goose still stands in the beautiful park waiting to greet today’s young visitors.

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Entrance to children’s zoo at Fejervary Park [ca.1950’s]

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Three children and fawn, calico [May 1956]

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Four girls and ducks by castle in Fejervary Park [ca.1950’s]

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Boy holding raccoon [ca. 1950’s]

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People watching ducks by castle in Fejervary Park [ca. 1950’s]

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Children petting donkey at Fejervary Park [May 1958]

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A Fine Fourth of July Celebration: 1890 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/02/a-fine-fourth-of-july-celebration-1890/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/07/02/a-fine-fourth-of-july-celebration-1890/ Thu, 02 Jul 2015 12:59:14 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections As our thoughts turn to Fourth of July we are sharing an advertisement for a celebration that provided entertainment for the whole family. Taken from the July 2, 1890 Davenport Daily Times included in the day were a Reunion of Old Soldiers, … Continue reading

As our thoughts turn to Fourth of July we are sharing an advertisement for a celebration that provided entertainment for the whole family.

Taken from the July 2, 1890 Davenport Daily Times included in the day were a Reunion of Old Soldiers, Sham Battle, Balloon Ascension, and evening Fireworks.

A truly fine event.

4th of July

A Happy Fourth of July to everyone!

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Five Score and Ten Years Ago: Laying the cornerstone for Davenport (Central) High School http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/25/five-score-and-ten-years-ago-laying-the-cornerstone-for-davenport-central-high-school/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/25/five-score-and-ten-years-ago-laying-the-cornerstone-for-davenport-central-high-school/ Thu, 25 Jun 2015 10:09:56 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections 110 years ago on June 19, 1905 the cornerstone for the “new” Davenport High School building was laid. A parade of 4,000 children walked from Washington Square to the Main Street site where the basement walls had been raised. There … Continue reading

110 years ago on June 19, 1905 the cornerstone for the “new” Davenport High School building was laid. A parade of 4,000 children walked from Washington Square to the Main Street site where the basement walls had been raised. There were orations by honored guests and a 40-piece band directed by Prof. Ernst Otto played to an enthusiastic reception. Superintendent J.B. Young placed a metallic box in the cornerstone that included a handwritten list of high school faculty members, the names of all the graduates of the school and photographs of Kemper Hall, Sheldon Hall and Griswold College among many other items.

The architectural firm of Claussen and Burrows designed the $250,000 building described as a superior facility. The site chosen was “ideal” – located on the top of Main Street hill on grounds originally occupied by Iowa College (which moved to Grinnell) and later by Griswold College. The site commanded “a magnificent view of the city and the Father of Waters.”

Fine Auditorium

On the first story will be the main entrances from the east and west with an additional entrance on the north side for the auditorium. The auditorium, including the gallery, will have a seating capacity of 1,200. This place of assembly will outrank room 10, the place of convocation in the present High school, in every way.

110 years later, it is refreshing to see the commitment to this school as ground is broken for a new auditorium and pool on this ideal site! Although there was no parade or band, there were news crews and tweets and tumbles to spread the good news. We congratulate Davenport Central High School and copy the sentiments of one of those gracious speakers in 1905 who said, “Let it rise, gentlemen, in the sunlight of modern progress; let its banners wave in the air of intellectual freedom and let the spirit of tolerance abide within its halls forever and forever.”

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Sources:

History of Scott County, Iowa [Downer, 1910]

Davenport Democrat and Leader, Tuesday, June 20, 1905, “Cornerstone of New $250,000 High School Laid Yesterday”

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Daddy Doodles http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/18/daddy-doodles/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/18/daddy-doodles/ Thu, 18 Jun 2015 09:27:34 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One of our favorite books in our collection is A portfolio of cartoons as published by the Davenport Times 1912-13. As the title suggests, it contains a series of caricatures of prominent Davenport citizens that were published in the local newspaper … Continue reading

One of our favorite books in our collection is A portfolio of cartoons as published by the Davenport Times 1912-13. As the title suggests, it contains a series of caricatures of prominent Davenport citizens that were published in the local newspaper just over 100 years ago. The cartoons were accompanied by short descriptive poems written by Irving C. Norwood.

While browsing through the cartoons, we noticed not only several successful men, but their successful sons as well. In honor of Father’s Day, we would like to share with your some of those pages (and another sketch from our photograph collection). We’ve added full names, birth and death years, and career paths below the sketch.

– Congressman Joe R. Lane of Lane & Waterman was also VP of First National Bank.

Joe R. Lane (1858-1931), lawyer; father of J. Reed Lane.

Joe R. Lane (1858-1931), lawyer; father of James Reed Lane.

J. Reed Lane, like his father, was also a lawyer and associated with many companies.

James Reed Lane (1889-1955), lawyer, son of Joe R. Lane.

James Reed Lane (1889-1955), lawyer, son of Joe R. Lane.

– G.W. French was president of French & Hecht and lived at Iowana Farms.

George Watson French (1858-1934), manufacturer, father of G. Decker French

George Watson French (1858-1934), manufacturer, father of George Decker French

– G. Decker French was president of Central Engineering Company.

G. Decker French (1887-1959), contractor, son of George Watson French

George Decker French (1887-1959), contractor, son of George Watson French

C.A. Ficke was kind of a big deal. See our LibGuide for more information.

Charles August Ficke (1850-1931), lawyer, father of Arthur Davison Ficke

Charles August Ficke (1850-1931), lawyer, father of Arthur Davison Ficke

– Author A. D. Ficke was not included in the book like father C. A. Ficke. This etching of A. D. Ficke was made by Josef Pierre Nuyttens in 1914.

Arthur Davison Ficke (1883-1945), writer, son of Charles August Ficke

Arthur Davison Ficke (1883-1945), writer, son of Charles August Ficke

 

posted by Cristina

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The Day a Public Enemy Came to Davenport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/11/the-day-a-public-enemy-came-to-davenport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/11/the-day-a-public-enemy-came-to-davenport/ Thu, 11 Jun 2015 09:44:18 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections It probably started as a routine patrol for Officer Elmer Schlueter on June 14, 1934. It was a warm summer morning at about 10:30 a.m. Officer Schlueter, a twelve year veteran of the Davenport Police Department, was patrolling the levee … Continue reading

It probably started as a routine patrol for Officer Elmer Schlueter on June 14, 1934. It was a warm summer morning at about 10:30 a.m. Officer Schlueter, a twelve year veteran of the Davenport Police Department, was patrolling the levee area near LeClaire Park when something out of the ordinary caught his eye.

It was a well-dressed man in a gray checkered suit carrying a large briefcase. He seemed out of place when Officer Schlueter approached him. Schlueter asked to look in the briefcase. The man handed it over and Officer Schlueter began to look through its contents.

Suddenly the man drew a gun and managed to disarm the officer. He forced Schlueter down the path leading to the Municipal Baseball Stadium. At that moment former Alderman and current secretary-treasurer of the Davenport Baseball Club, Al Schultze, was driving towards the men from the stadium. The armed man stopped Schultze’s car, forced Schlueter and himself into the back seat and ordered Schultze to drive. They headed along Rockingham Road west towards Buffalo.

Officer Elmer Schlueter and Al Schultze would soon learn they had been kidnapped by Joe Palmer, murderer and part-time member of the Barrow Gang. The gang had made headlines starting in 1932 for not only bank robberies, but murder as well. Barrow members Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker had been shot and killed on May 23, 1934 in Louisiana. The remaining free gang members were doing their best to avoid arrest. They were wanted in several states for their numerous crimes.

Witnesses immediately alerted the Davenport Police Department to the kidnapping. The police department was faced with two scenarios. The first being this was “just” a kidnapping that had taken place. The second scenario was the possibility this was part of a larger heist. With all officers on alert searching for the kidnap victims would other criminals be waiting to stage bank robberies in an unprotected city?

The police department split its resources sending some officers to cover local city banks while all others went out in force to find the missing men. The Scott County Sheriff called on their Vigilantes to go to county banks to cover them in case of attempted robberies.

Soon Mr. Schultze’s car was located on the side of the road near Blue Grass. It was then reported that Walcott veterinarian, Dr. W. H. Fitch, had never returned from a call he made to the Bernick farm in Blue Grass. He was last seen driving a Ford coupe about 10:45 a.m.

By 2:00 p.m. a report was made of a car matching Dr. Fitch’s driving rapidly west on Route 6 near Walcott. Officers immediately started in pursuit and cities along the way were notified to be on the lookout.

Davenport Police Chief Sam Kelly ordered all officers not on duty to head to Blue Grass and Walcott. They searched all wooded areas along the roadside to see if they could find the victims. All they found were veterinarian supplies and a briefcase. Even a local airplane was put into service to fly over the county to try to spot either the car or the men. No trace could be found.

Finally, at 3:45 a.m. on June 15th a call came into the Davenport Police Department. It was Officer Schlueter. He, Al Schultze, and Dr. Fitch had been released by their kidnapper in St. Joseph, Missouri. Both The Daily Times and The Davenport Democrat covered the story of their ordeal.

Al Schultze reported that Palmer was not happy with the condition of his car and soon after they got into Blue Grass Dr. Fitch was waved over while driving towards Davenport. Palmer soon had Officer Schlueter, who stood about 6 feet tall, placed in the small trunk of Fitch’s coupe. He locked the trunk and then ordered Fitch and Schultze into the car. Palmer made one of the men drive the car while he sat in the back with the remaining man. He kept a gun pointed at the man sitting next to him and told the driver if he made any wrong moves the other man was dead.

The route Palmer made the men drive headed west to Iowa City and then on to Washington, Kansas. They then back tracked into Iowa and headed towards St. Joseph, Missouri.

During the trip, Palmer made sure his kidnap victims saw the two .45 caliber automatic pistols he carried. He told the men they were gifts from Clyde Barrow who he spoke of in glowing terms. Palmer had no love for Officer Schlueter, or any other police officers. He mentioned several times during the kidnapping he should “do something” to Schlueter, but never followed through on the threat.

Of the three kidnapped men, Schlueter suffered the most physically during the ordeal. He was forced to lay on his side in the cramped trunk with the lid pressing into him. Breathing was difficult in that position and the heat from the sun hitting the car’s metal frame caused the small area to become a sweltering prison.

Suddenly, just after 3:00 a.m. Joe Palmer had the driver stop the car. He said he would let them have the car if they would return directly to Davenport. The men readily agreed. Palmer robbed the men of their money ($135 from Dr. Fitch, $93 from Al Schultze, and $1 from Officer Schlueter), but returned $15 to help them make the trip back to Davenport. Then Joe Palmer simply walked away.

Officer Schlueter, Mr. Schultze, and Dr. Fitch located police officers within 15 minutes of being released. Palmer was soon caught and taken into custody.

While being questioned in St. Joseph, Joe Palmer stated he kidnapped Officer Schlueter fearing he had seen a gun that was inside the briefcase. If Palmer was taken into custody he feared his identity would be discovered and he would be returned to Texas where he faced not only an escape charge from a jailbreak in early 1934, but the killing of a guard in the process.

Palmer asked to be taken to Davenport to face kidnapping charges. The sentence for that would be less than what he faced in Texas. Instead, he was returned to Texas where he was put on trial before being sent to the electric chair on May 10, 1935 along with fellow Barrow gang member Raymond Hamilton.

The families of Elmer Schlueter, Al Schultze, and Dr. Fitch were relieved when the men drove into town the evening of June 15th. The newspapers carried banner headlines of their return. Soon, life seemed to quiet down and the headlines were about other local stories.

The Barrow Gang’s crime spree ended in 1934 with the death of Clyde and Bonnie along with the arrest of many of its members. Officer Schlueter would return to work and eventually retire from the Davenport Police Department on July 16, 1946 after 24 years of service.

The early 1930’s were filled with gangs crisscrossing the United States stopping in small towns to rob banks or hide out. We feel certain that the people of Davenport were glad that no event like the day Joe Palmer came to town happened again.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Awash in the Electric Glow: Vander Veer Fountain’s 80th Year http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/04/awash-in-the-electric-glow-vander-veer-fountains-80th-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/06/04/awash-in-the-electric-glow-vander-veer-fountains-80th-year/ Thu, 04 Jun 2015 14:32:08 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One of Davenport’s local attractions is celebrating its 80th birthday this year. The electric fountain at Vander Veer Botanical Park opened on May 29, 1935 to the fascinated gazes of children and adults alike. The new fountain took the place … Continue reading

One of Davenport’s local attractions is celebrating its 80th birthday this year. The electric fountain at Vander Veer Botanical Park opened on May 29, 1935 to the fascinated gazes of children and adults alike.

The new fountain took the place of an older Victorian fountain made of iron that had become structurally unsafe and was removed shortly before the new fountain’s construction began.

The Daily Times gave a full report on the construction of the fountain in its May 30, 1935 edition. The four basic colors used in the light display were amber, red, blue, and green. Seven projectors and three different types of sprays helped create the magical evening show that fascinated thousands of visitors that summer.

According to The City of Davenport, Iowa Annual Report 1934 – 1935 the fountain cost $3,091.73 to building during Fiscal Year 1935.  An additional $597.45 was spent during Fiscal Year 1936 to finish the fountain project according to the 1935 – 1936 report.

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Construction work on the stone fountain at Vander Veer Park. [ca. 1933]

Since its first day of operation 80 years ago the fountain has had its ups and downs in operation. There were long periods of closure as worn out parts and finances stopped the beautiful night shows.

The fountain was once again restored and came alight in the summer of 2004. It remains a popular spot on hot summer days and (hopefully) cool evenings to visit.

If you haven’t been by recently, maybe stop by this summer to take a break, enjoy the beauty, and be part of a special 80-year-old tradition.

PCVVF

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Brown Bag Lunch Presentation: Eugene Ely, Daredevil Aviator http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/05/28/brown-bag-lunch-presentation-eugene-ely-daredevil-aviator/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/05/28/brown-bag-lunch-presentation-eugene-ely-daredevil-aviator/ Thu, 28 May 2015 14:29:45 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Author William M. Miller will be at the Davenport Main Library on Thursday, June 4th at noon for a presentation on local pioneer aviator Eugene Ely. Bring your own lunch from home or pick up a boxed lunch from any of the … Continue reading

Author William M. Miller will be at the Davenport Main Library on Thursday, June 4th at noon for a presentation on local pioneer aviator Eugene Ely.

Bring your own lunch from home or pick up a boxed lunch from any of the nearby Downtown Davenport restaurants.

Check out this blog post about Eugene Ely published in November 2010 in honor of National Aviation Month.

For fans of local history, aviation history, biographies, daredevils and stunts!

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(posted by Cristina)

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OMG! NARA AAD DCAS FYI! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/05/21/omg-nara-aad-dcas-fyi/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/05/21/omg-nara-aad-dcas-fyi/ Thu, 21 May 2015 09:11:13 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections With Memorial Day approaching, the staff at Richardson-Sloane Special Collections thought to share an online government resource to aid in searching for veterans who have served in United States military forces. These resources are free and may be accessed from any … Continue reading

With Memorial Day approaching, the staff at Richardson-Sloane Special Collections thought to share an online government resource to aid in searching for veterans who have served in United States military forces.

These resources are free and may be accessed from any computer. As always, our staff would be pleased to assist anyone visiting our department with research help on our public computers.

Following is a brief tutorial created by a RSSC staff member on one way to search part of the U.S. National Archives Records Administration Access to Archival Databases.

And yes, we found a lot of acronyms involved!

The Defense Casualty Analysis System (DCAS) is part of  the U. S. National Archives & Records Administration (NARA) Access to Archival Databases (AAD).

This series was created for the Department of Defense (DoD) and contains records of U.S. military officers and soldiers who died as a result of either a hostile or non-hostile occurrence in the Korean War, Vietnam War, Gulf War, or War on Terrorism. It includes persons who were missing in action and prisoners of war, deaths occurring during peacetime (beginning in 1975), and deaths resulting from accident or illness. Dates of death range from June 28, 1950 to May 28, 2006.

There are several other databases available on this site and they are organized by category. We were looking for casualties.

NARA - AAD - Main Page

 

Click the search button next to Defense Casualty Analysis System (DCAS). You can also search only Korean War or Vietnam Conflict casualties by selecting their “Extract Data File”

NARA - AAD - Casualties

 

You can search by name, birth date, hometown, casualty location or death date. You may also add other fields to search. We searched for people from Davenport, Iowa and got 59 results.

NARA - AAD - Fielded Search

 

The search results only show up to 10 fields (name, service, birth date, hometown, place of death, death date, war or conflict name, casualty/incident category). You can sort by any of these fields, for this example we sorted by birth date. Select the person you want and click on View Record to get more information.

NARA - AAD - Display

 

Each record may include: the service member’s name, service name, rank or rate, occupation, date of birth,  hometown (city, county, state or province, country), casualty city, state or province and country, death date, war or conflict, operation incident, location, hostile or non-hostile death indicator, casualty type and category, incident casualty reason, body (recovered or not).

This is a wonderful site with many options. We hope it opens many research doors for those searching this Memorial Day.

(posted by Cristina)

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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