Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2015 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ National Read Across America Day! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/national-read-across-america-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/national-read-across-america-day/ Sun, 01 Mar 2015 08:00:55 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe Happy National Read Across America Day! Read Across America is a program put together by the National Education Association that encourages children and teens to read by partnering with various community organizations, doing events across the country, and by providing reading resources. One of their more publicized events throughout the year is National Read Across America Day, […]

Read Across America: An NEA projectHappy National Read Across America Day! Read Across America is a program put together by the National Education Association that encourages children and teens to read by partnering with various community organizations, doing events across the country, and by providing reading resources. One of their more publicized events throughout the year is National Read Across America Day, which is March 2nd AND is also Dr. Seuss’ birthday. As a tribute to Dr. Seuss this year, the National Education Association has chosen Oh, The Places You’ll Go as the book to be read across the country.

If you’re looking for ways to set up your own Read Across America event, the NEA has you covered! Check out their Plan a Reading Event page to find materials, certificates, banners, and more! Still need more event ideas or are you curious if there are already any Read Across America Day events planned in your local community? Visit their events page to check out the events happening across the country(and the world!) and also take the Read Across America pledge.

Come to the library and check out what other wonderful Dr. Seuss materials are available! If Dr. Seuss isn’t your cup of tea, don’t worry! Our librarians can help you find other materials to help you enjoy Read Across America Day!

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Celebrate Notable African-American Women! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/celebrate-notable-african-american-women/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/celebrate-notable-african-american-women/ Sat, 28 Feb 2015 08:00:19 -0600 Katie at Davenport Library Info Cafe As African-American History Month draws to a close and Women’s History Month begins, celebrate both by discovering these turn-of-the-twentieth-century African-American women activists on your library’s shelves:   Journalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) first spoke out against the lynching of blacks in the South from the pages of her own Memphis, Tennessee newspaper. This act began her fierce campaign to […]

As African-American History Month draws to a close and Women’s History Month begins, celebrate both by discovering these turn-of-the-twentieth-century African-American women activists on your library’s shelves:

 

IdaBWellsJournalist Ida B. Wells-Barnett (1862-1931) first spoke out against the lynching of blacks in the South from the pages of her own Memphis, Tennessee newspaper. This act began her fierce campaign to end the injustice through her lectures and writings. On Lynchings collects three of her influential publications on the subject.

 

 

 

TerrellIn her 1940 autobiography, A Colored Woman in a White World, Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954) describes her career as a speaker dedicated to advancing the causes of civil rights and women’s suffrage.

 

 

 

 

 

Callie houseHistorian Mary Frances Berry rescues Callie House (1861–1928) from obscurity in My Face is Black is True: Callie House and the Struggle for Ex-Slave Reparations. Founder of the National Ex-Slave Mutual Relief, Bounty and Pension Association, House began a grass-roots movement calling for Congress to compensate former slaves for the labor they performed during centuries of captivity.

 

 

 

 

biog in context graphic

Explore the lives of other remarkable African-American women with Biography in Context. This online database conveniently gathers information from reference works, academic publications, newspapers, magazines, radio broadcasts, websites, and other sources to create”media-rich” profiles of historical figures, writers, artists, celebrities, and other prominent individuals.

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DPL’s 2015 Zinio Magazine Titles http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/dpls-2015-zinio-magazine-titles/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/dpls-2015-zinio-magazine-titles/ Fri, 27 Feb 2015 08:00:49 -0600 Valerie at Davenport Library Info Cafe Two dozen new titles have been added to our Zinio magazine offerings. That brings this year’s total to over 90 great periodicals that you can download with your Davenport Public Library account. Unfamiliar with Zinio? Now is a great time to take a look at downloading full issues of great titles.  Interested?  Then be certain to […]

Zinio - New Titles - ImageTwo dozen new titles have been added to our Zinio magazine offerings. That brings this year’s total to over 90 great periodicals that you can download with your Davenport Public Library account.

Unfamiliar with Zinio? Now is a great time to take a look at downloading full issues of great titles.  Interested?  Then be certain to create a new account and check out a magazine during your visit.

Heads up, even after creating an account, during your first checkout you’ll be asked to create an account for your downloads.  Tip:  Use the same username and passwords for both logins.

These issues are always available; no need for reserves. Once checked out, they stay on your account indefinitely, meaning you can go on a wild checkout spree, then read them at your convenience. Once finished, simply remove the issues from your account.

You’ll find both current and past issues are available. That is, back issue availability is based upon when our subscription began.   You’ll even find older issues for magazines to which we no longer subscribe still available to you.

 

Current titles:

100 Ideas Real Rooms,   Allrecipes,   American Cowboy,   American PHOTO,   AppleMagazine,   Autoweek,   Backpacker,   Backyard & Garden Design Ideas,   Better Homes and Gardens,   Bicycling,   BirdWatching,   Bloomberg Businessweek,   Bon Appetit,   Car and Driver,   Chicago Magazine,   Cosmopolitan,   Cottage Life,   Country Gardens,   Country Living,   Discover,   Do It Yourself,   Dogs Life,   Dwell – Best Homes in America,   EatingWell,   Elle,   ESPN The Magazine,   Esquire,   Every Day with Rachael Ray,   Family Circle,   Family Handyman,   FamilyFun,   Food Network Magazine,   Forbes,   Good Housekeeping ,   Harper’s Bazaar,   HGTV Magazine,   House Beautiful,   Interweave Knits,   iPad & iPhone User,   iPhone Life,   Kiplinger’s Personal Finance,   Knit Wear,   Macworld,   Marie Claire,   Martha Stewart Living,   Martha Stewart Weddings,   Maxim,   Men’s Fitness,   Men’s Health,   mental_floss,   Midwest Living,   MOTHER EARTH NEWS,   Motor Trend,   National Geographic Interactive,   National Geographic Traveler Interactive,   Newsweek,   O, The Oprah Magazine,   OK! Magazine,   Organic Gardening,   OUT,   PC Magazine,   PCWorld,   Popular Mechanics,   Popular Science,   Prevention,   Reader’s Digest,   Redbook,   Rolling Stone,   Runner’s World,   Running Times,   Shape,   Smithsonian Magazine,   Soap Opera Digest,   Spirituality & Health Magazine,   Star Magazine,   Storage,   Taste of Home,   The Atlantic,   The Economist,   The Writer,   Town & Country,   Traditional Home,   True West,   TV Guide Magazine,   Us Weekly,   Weight Watchers,   Woman’s Day,   Women’s Health,   WOOD Magazine,   Woodcraft Magazine,   Yoga Journal

 

 

 

 

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Cat Out of Hell by Lynne Truss http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/cat-out-of-hell-by-lynne-truss/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/cat-out-of-hell-by-lynne-truss/ Thu, 26 Feb 2015 08:00:36 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe For people who both love and hate cats comes the tale of Alec Charlesworth, a librarian who finds himself suddenly alone: he’s lost his job, his beloved wife has just died, and to top it all off, his sister has disappeared. Overcome by grief, he stands in his sister’s kitchen staring at the only witness […]

cat out of hellFor people who both love and hate cats comes the tale of Alec Charlesworth, a librarian who finds himself suddenly alone: he’s lost his job, his beloved wife has just died, and to top it all off, his sister has disappeared. Overcome by grief, he stands in his sister’s kitchen staring at the only witness to what’s happened to her – her cat, Roger. Who then speaks to him.

It takes a while for Alec to realize he’s not gone mad from grief, that the cat is actually speaking . . . and that much of what we fear about cats is true. They do think they’re smarter than humans, for one thing. And, well, it seems they are! What’s more, they do have nine lives. Or at least this one does – Roger’s older than Methuselah, and his unblinking stare comes from the fact that he’s seen it all.

And in Cat Out of Hell he’s got a tale to tell, a tale of shocking local history and dark forces that may link not only the death of Alec’s wife, but also several other local deaths. But will the cat help Alec, or is he one of the dark forces? (description from publisher)

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Join Our Family Album! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/25/join-our-family-album/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/25/join-our-family-album/ Wed, 25 Feb 2015 15:26:33 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections It’s no secret that family photographs forge connections to the past. We may never have met Aunt Betsy or Great-Grandpa Milton, but we can see ourselves in their faces and learn something of our family circumstances through their clothes and … Continue reading
Tuskegee Institute Singers

The Tuskegee Institute Singers were not related to each other, but after so much time on the road, making music, they were family.

It’s no secret that family photographs forge connections to the past. We may never have met Aunt Betsy or Great-Grandpa Milton, but we can see ourselves in their faces and learn something of our family circumstances through their clothes and smiles and settings.

Our Special Collections Center has hundreds of faces and family groups in our photograph collections. Our patrons have not only found their ancestors among these images, but they’ve also made connections to our shared history.

We’re proud to say that our image collections are something of a Community Family Album.

But we’re afraid some of our community has been  left out.

Most of our portrait photographs were taken by only one or two studios—the Hostetler Studio and the Free Studio, in particular—for only a few decades.  These studios were not necessarily affordable to everyone and weren’t necessarily the first choice for many ethnic groups in Davenport.

Some of our patrons have been generous enough to add their families’ images to our collections, either by donating their originals or allowing us to scan them for our digital archives.  But not everyone knows that our Center equipped to archive and preserve donations of local photographs.

We are!  And we need your help to fill in the gaps in our “Album”!

If you have portrait photographs of family members (or people you consider family) and can provide information about them—even if you only know their names and relationship to you—we would love to add them to our Archive to preserve and provide access to them for future generations.

Contact Jessica Mirasol, the Special Collections/Archives Supervising  Librarian: jmirasol[at]davenportlibrary[dot]com

Your family is part of our history—please help us put faces to them!

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And the Oscar Goes To…. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/and-the-oscar-goes-to-3/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/and-the-oscar-goes-to-3/ Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:00:07 -0600 Bianca Sierra at Davenport Library Info Cafe   The 87th Academy Award Ceremony was held on Sunday, February 22 in Hollywood California. Many of 2014’s best shows were given honors, and most of the winners will be making their way to the shelves during the next few months. Several have already arrived! For a complete list of nominees and winners visit http://oscar.go.com/nominees The […]

The 85th Academy Awards® will air live on Oscar® Sunday, February 24, 2013.

 

The 87th Academy Award Ceremony was held on Sunday, February 22 in Hollywood California. Many of 2014’s best shows were given honors, and most of the winners will be making their way to the shelves during the next few months. Several have already arrived!

For a complete list of nominees and winners visit http://oscar.go.com/nominees

The Grand Budapest Hotel – Tells the tale of two friends working at a famous hotel between WWI and WWII. Winner for Best Costume Design, Makeup and Hair Style, Original Score, and Production Design.

Ida – A young woman in 1960’s Poland is about to take her holy vows to become a nun when she discovers a family secret. Winner Best Foreign Language Film.

Boyhood The story of a boy growing up from ages six to eighteen. It was filmed over the course of twelve years. Winner Patricia Arquette for Best Supporting Actress.

Birdman – A dark comedy starring Michael Keaton as a washed up actor getting ready for opening night of the Broadway play he is in. Winner for Best Directing, Cinematography, Original Screenplay, and Motion Picture of the  Year.

Big Hero Six – A group of friends form a band of high tech super heroes. Winner Best Animated Feature Film.

Whiplash – A young drummer is pushed to the limits when he enrolls at a music conservatory. Winner for Best Film Editing, Best Sound Mixing, and Best Male Supporting Actor J.K. Simmons.

The Theory of Everything – The story of Stephen Hawking and his wife. Winner Eddie Redmayne for Best Actor. Coming in March.

 Imitation Game – Mathematicians try to crack the enigma code during WWII. Winner Best Adapted Screenplay. Coming in April.

Interstellar – With the world soon coming to an end, a group of explorers travel through a wormhole across the galaxy to find a new place for mankind. Winner for Best Visual Effects. Coming in April.

Crisis Hotline – A documentary about Veterans that have turned to the Veteran Crisis Hotline to help with trauma at home. Winner Best Documentary. Coming Soon. 

Still Alice – A woman struggling with Early Onset Alzheimer’s. Winner Julianne Moore for Best Actress. Coming Soon.

American Sniper – A Navy Seal Sniper returns home after four tours of duty in a war he can’t leave behind. Winner Best Sound Editing. Coming Soon.

Selma – Martin Luther King Jr.’s march from Selma to Montgomery Alabama for equal voting rights. Coming Soon

 

 

 

 

 

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The Pocket Wife by Susan Crawford http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-pocket-wife-by-susan-crawford/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-pocket-wife-by-susan-crawford/ Tue, 24 Feb 2015 08:00:22 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe Dana Catrell’s life is in chaos. She’s married to a lawyer who makes her feel trivial, as if stuck inside his pocket like loose change. She’s also sliding toward the brink of insanity. Devastated by mania, part of her bipolar disorder, Dana finds that there are troubling holes in her memory, including what happened on […]

pocket wifeDana Catrell’s life is in chaos. She’s married to a lawyer who makes her feel trivial, as if stuck inside his pocket like loose change. She’s also sliding toward the brink of insanity. Devastated by mania, part of her bipolar disorder, Dana finds that there are troubling holes in her memory, including what happened on the afternoon of her friend Celia’s death. She’s horrified to learn she’s the only other person with a key to Celia’s house – and the last person to see her alive. She and Celia had shared recipes and gossip. But not secrets – until that final afternoon. Closing her eyes, Dana can see images, loose pieces of a hazy puzzle. Sangria in a glass, a tiny rip in Celia’s screen door, Celia lying in a pool of blood, the broken vase beside her head, the kitchen knife just so above her hand. But there are infuriating, terrifying gaps. Is murder on her mind–or is it all in her head?

 

As evidence starts to point in her direction, Dana will use the clarity her mania brings her to fill in the blanks and clear her name before her demons win out. But her husband’s odd behavior and the persistent probing of Detective Jack Moss complicate Dana’s search for answers. The closer she comes to piecing together shards of her broken memory, the closer Dana comes to falling apart. Is there a killer lurking inside her . . . or is there one out there in the shadows of reality, waiting to strike again?

 

A story of marriage, murder, and madness, The Pocket Wife is a sophisticated, gripping tale of psychological suspense that explores the world through the foggy lens of a woman on the edge. (description from publisher)

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French Bistro by Maria Zihammou http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/french-bistro-by-maria-zihammou/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/french-bistro-by-maria-zihammou/ Mon, 23 Feb 2015 08:00:45 -0600 Ann at Davenport Library Info Cafe The corner bistro offers all the highlights of French cuisine: crepes, bouillabaisse, ratatouille, and beef bourguignonne – all with rustic flair, simple ingredients, and impeccable flavors. Now, with Maria Zihammou’s French Bistro, you can cook up the authentic tastes of France in your own kitchen. Each recipe shows how intricate meals steeped in culinary tradition […]

french bistroThe corner bistro offers all the highlights of French cuisine: crepes, bouillabaisse, ratatouille, and beef bourguignonne – all with rustic flair, simple ingredients, and impeccable flavors. Now, with Maria Zihammou’s French Bistro, you can cook up the authentic tastes of France in your own kitchen.

Each recipe shows how intricate meals steeped in culinary tradition can be re-created with simple techniques using modern ingredients and equipment. This is a tribute to proper French cuisine, featuring bistro takes on such classics as: Marinated olives, Croque-monsieur and croque-madame: open sandwich with ham and cheese, Pan-bagnat: picnic sandwich with tuna and veggies, Quiche Lorraine, Soupe à l’oignon: French onion soup, Entrecôte with béarnaise and many more mouthwatering dishes. In addition, a chapter on cheese shows the proper making of a cheese course, a French tradition.

French Bistro takes you into the world of cozy French neighborhoods and cuisine with a charming design and gorgeous, photographs. Discover the joys of French cooking and be inspired by passionate food! (description from publisher)

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American Sniper by Chris Kyle http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/american-sniper-by-chris-kyle/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/american-sniper-by-chris-kyle/ Fri, 20 Feb 2015 08:00:14 -0600 Bill at Davenport Library Info Cafe As the movie American Sniper sets its sights on box office records and Oscar wins, did you know the story of Navy Seal marksman Chris Kyle was a book first?   Clearly a master of his craft, Kyle was also the author of a book about the most important U.S. firearms.  Get them at the Davenport […]

american sniperAs the movie American Sniper sets its sights on box office records and Oscar wins, did you know the story of Navy Seal marksman Chris Kyle was a book first?   Clearly a master of his craft, Kyle was also the author of a book about the most important U.S. firearms.  Get them at the Davenport Public Library.

American Gun: A History of the U.S. in Ten Firearms

Drawing on his unmatched firearms knowledge and combat experience, Kyle carefully chose ten guns to help tell his story. Through them, he revisits thrilling turning points in American history, including the single sniper shot that turned the tide of the Revolutionary War, the firearms designs that proved decisive at Gettysburg, the “gun that won the West,” and the weapons that gave U.S. soldiers an edge in the world wars and beyond. This is also the story of how firearms innovation, creativity, and industrial genius has constantly pushed American history–and power–forward. Filled with an unforgettable cast of characters, Chris Kyle’s American Gun is a sweeping epic of bravery, adventure, invention, and sacrifice. (description from publisher)

 

American Sniper: the Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in US Military History

He is the deadliest American sniper ever, called “the devil” by the enemies he hunted and “the legend” by his Navy SEAL brothers . . . From 1999 to 2009, U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle recorded the most career sniper kills in United States military history. The Pentagon has officially confirmed more than 150 of Kyle’s kills (the previous American record was 109), but it has declined to verify the astonishing total number for this book. Iraqi insurgents feared him so much they placed a bounty on his head. Kyle earned legendary status among his fellow U.S. warriors, whom he protected with deadly accuracy from rooftops and stealth positions. Gripping and unforgettable, Kyle’s masterful account of his extraordinary battlefield experiences ranks as one of the great war memoirs of all time. (description from publisher)

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The Great February Escape http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/19/the-great-february-escape/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/19/the-great-february-escape/ Thu, 19 Feb 2015 13:24:44 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections While most of us want to stay inside on cold, snowy February days, there are those who don’t mind the weather as long as they are able to get out in the fresh air. That is apparently how six prisoners … Continue reading

While most of us want to stay inside on cold, snowy February days, there are those who don’t mind the weather as long as they are able to get out in the fresh air.

That is apparently how six prisoners felt on February 18, 1869, when they broke out of the Scott County Jail in the middle of a blustery winter day.

Turns out, it was not that hard to do.

The six men included Benjamin F. Newell, who was awaiting trial for counterfeiting;  Michael Clancy, who was awaiting trial for murder; Michael McCoy who had pled guilty to assault with intent to rob; John Harvey, who had pled guilty to larceny and burglary; Elisha Buckner, a horse thief; and Pat McCann, who was waiting to be tried for larceny.

The men had watched the jailer and staff and had learned their daily routines. They knew on this particular Thursday, the staff would be especially busy next door at the courthouse, where several trials were going on at once.

Despite the snow and cold, the six men made their move.

A description of the jail can be found in a March 28, 1855, advertisement in the Davenport Daily Gazette for construction bids. The jail was to be built of stone with a size of forty-two by fifty-two feet containing twenty rooms.

Fifteen of those rooms were for the prisoners; the remaining five were for the jailer—generally the Sheriff—who would live at the jail with his family.  The jailer’s wife was expected to cook for the prisoners along with doing their laundry.

Davenport Daily Gazette March 28, 1855

This bid does not mention how many floors the jail had, but we are able to glean that information from Mr. William Ott, who reported the escape. Mr. Ott’s commented in the Davenport Daily Gazette on February 19, 1869, that he thought the men originally were talking to the female prisoners on the second floor of the jail.

The jail was located near the corner of Ripley and Fifth Streets next to the courthouse. The front of the building housed the parlor, or waiting room, for the jail on one side and the jailer’s parlor on the other side. A long hall ran down the middle to the jail area.

A thick stone wall made of rubble stone about twenty-one inches thick separated the jail from the front section. Behind the thick wall was a large room with an indoor privy at one end and jail cells along the back wall.

Sometime in the morning of February 18th the prisoners began to dig into the wall dividing the jail from the jailer’s parlor. Using pieces of metal found in the area, they dug until the afternoon. They took the rubble from the wall and dropped it down the privy at the opposite end of the room.

They finally broke through about 4:00 p.m.

The escape almost failed in the first few minutes when Michael McCoy got stuck trying to get through the hole. It took a great deal of shoving and pulling by his friends to get him through.

The men crawled into the jailer’s parlor and spotted a jug of alcohol. They apparently refreshed themselves and handed the jug through the hole for the eight male prisoners who had decided not to risk daring escape; most had been arrested for petty offenses and did not wish to get in more trouble.

The intrepid criminals crawled out a parlor window and then hopped the back fence to the sidewalk, which is where Mr. Ott spotted them. Once he realized it was an escape he ran to the courthouse to alert the Sheriff.

According to the Davenport Daily Gazette and the Daily Democrat,  the courthouse erupted upon the news and men ran to saddle their horses to find the escapees.

Mr. McCann and Mr. Buckner were caught soon after their escape. They had both headed out to the prairie (now the Locust Street area) in separate directions, but were easy to track in the snow.

Mr. Clancy and Mr. McCoy stuck together and headed to Buffalo, Iowa. They spent the night in a barn there before being caught the next day.

As for Mr. Newell and Mr. Harvey, it was rumored they headed toward the Mississippi River—but as far as our resources tell us,  no trace of them was ever found.

The Daily Democrat  reported on February 19th that “The place where they got out was a very weak spot…”   This seems to be an understatement. Though no further condition reports were made, we can only guess that the wall was strengthened after this incident—or possibly the prisoners were given more supervision, even on busy days!

(posted by Amy D.)

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Wipeout: The Game http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/wipeout-the-game/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/wipeout-the-game/ Thu, 19 Feb 2015 08:00:58 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe Have you ever watched a television show and wished you could be on it? I have many times! Whether it’s a game show or talent competition or agility race, I have always wanted to at least try. But alas, I know I’m not coordinated enough and that I do not have a dancing bone anywhere in my body. Lucky for […]

wipeoutHave you ever watched a television show and wished you could be on it? I have many times! Whether it’s a game show or talent competition or agility race, I have always wanted to at least try. But alas, I know I’m not coordinated enough and that I do not have a dancing bone anywhere in my body. Lucky for me, videogames let me try my hand at reality television without the possibility of failure on a national public level. It’s a win!

Wipeout: The Game is one such game that I recently discovered. Wipeout is a game show on ABC that features contestants competing against each other in what the show calls “the world’s biggest obstacle course”. I believe it. Contestants flip through the air, flop into puddles of mud and water, and generally get beat-up as they compete to win the game. Wipeout: The Game lets you experience all the elements of the television show with no danger of injuring yourself. Don’t worry, the competition is still there as you try to hit the button at the end of the course as quick as you can. Play with up to four of your friends as you battle over 50 crazy obstacles, including the most famous and recognizable ones from the television show: The Sweeper, Sucker Punch, Big Balls, and even more. As you’re racing, listen to the commentators give you advice and generally cringe for your well-being as you bounce from obstacle to obstacle. This game has slow motion replays just like the television show that highlight all the bone-jarring wipeouts that happen. If you still manage to be losing to your friends, don’t worry! You can throw objects at the other competitors when it’s not your turn.

Pick up this game and live out your dream to compete in a game show with no worries of actually injuring yourself!

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How to Be a Heroine, or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/how-to-be-a-heroine-or-what-ive-learned-from-reading-too-much/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/how-to-be-a-heroine-or-what-ive-learned-from-reading-too-much/ Wed, 18 Feb 2015 08:00:17 -0600 Stephanie at Davenport Library Info Cafe How to Be a Heroine, or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much is a mix between memoir and literary criticism as author Samantha Ellis realizes that maybe the heroines she modeled herself after when she was younger were not the best choices. As a young child raised in an Iraqi-Jewish family in London, Ellis describes herself […]

how to be a heroineHow to Be a Heroine, or, What I’ve Learned from Reading Too Much is a mix between memoir and literary criticism as author Samantha Ellis realizes that maybe the heroines she modeled herself after when she was younger were not the best choices.

As a young child raised in an Iraqi-Jewish family in London, Ellis describes herself as someone who devoured books as a way to judge the characters in them for characteristics and actions she wanted to emulate. Reading this book, I found myself identifying with Ellis as I, too, looked to books as a way to test out new identities without having to fully behave the same way. Ellis realized that she had perhaps chosen the wrong heroine to try to become, so she decided to look at the female characters and writers that she had loved since childhood. What followed became this book.

As she examines these characters, who range from books such as The Little Mermaid, Anne of Green Gables, The Valley of the Dolls, as well as characters Franny Glass, Scarlett O’Hara, Lizzie Bennett, and the authors Austen, Woolf, Forster, Plath, and the Bronte sisters, Ellis realizes just how they all influenced her life and how some still do. Many other characters, authors, and books are also examined. Throughout this journey, Ellis dissects each heroine in an intriguing format that that pulls readers into both her life as a child and her life now. As she reevaluates these heroines, Ellis interjects stories from her childhood and eventually figures out just who she feels she should have looked up to back then and who she looks up to know.

Heroines, Ellis realizes, have shaped all of our lives, whether positively or negatively, and it is important to remember that growing and finding new heroines to model ourselves after is perfectly okay.

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Lovely Couples of Davenport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/12/lovely-couples-of-davenport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/12/lovely-couples-of-davenport/ Thu, 12 Feb 2015 12:13:11 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Valentine’s Day is for couples, so what better way to celebrate than by sharing some of the lovely photographs of Davenport couples taken by the Hostetler Studios? Dr. William A. & Sadie Benadom, [ca. 1905]  Dr. Benadom owned and managed … Continue reading

Shuey AngelsValentine’s Day is for couples, so what better way to celebrate than by sharing some of the lovely photographs of Davenport couples taken by the Hostetler Studios?

Flourish

Benadom - William and SadieDr. William A. & Sadie Benadom, [ca. 1905]

 Dr. Benadom owned and managed the Benadom Sanitarium in Davenport.
He’s clearly crazy about his wife!

Flourish

Moeller -- Hugo and Emelia

Hugo & Emilia (Wulf) Moeller, [ca. 1910]

 Hugo Moeller and Emilia Wulf were married in 1905.
Five years later, their daughter Janetta was born
and they apparently had no spare time for photography studios.

Flourish

Peterson -- Lavinius and Anetta

Lavinius W. & Anetta (Hoepfner) Petersen, [ca. 1905]

 Lavinius and Anetta Peterson
celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary in July of 1908.
The Hostetler Studio also photographed them separately, but they look happier together.

Flourish

Best -- Louis and Clara

Louis P. & Clara (Krause) Best, [ca. 1910]

Louis Philip Best married Clara Louisa Krause on January 12, 1899.
He might look grumpy, but as President of the Woodruff-Kroy Company and Vice-President of the Robert Krause Company, he was probably just busy.
Mrs. Best, as the wife of a busy man and the mother of two children, was probably extremely patient.

 Flourish

Masters 2

Masters 1Mr. & Mrs. F. A. Masters, [ca. 1910]

 We don’t know much about this stylish couple, except that they had excellent taste in fashion.

Flourish

Decker-- Charles and Isabel

Charles W. & Isabel (Morgan) Decker, [ca. 1910]

Charles Decker and Isabel Morgan were married in 1872.
They had three sons, and a country house for them to run around in.
Mr. Decker died the year before they would have celebrated their 40th anniversary.

Flourish

Hayward -- Eugene and Ellen

Major Eugene B. & Ellen (Phelps) Hayward, [ca. 1910]

Eugene Hayward and Ellen Phelps were married in New York in 1864 and came to Davenport in about 1869.
They celebrated their Golden Wedding Anniversary by having their photograph taken.
They may be sitting in separate chairs at the moment, but don’t let that fool you;
by all accounts, they doted on each other.

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Introducing LibGuides! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/06/introducing-libguides/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/02/06/introducing-libguides/ Fri, 06 Feb 2015 14:47:34 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections One of the biggest challenges of doing genealogy and local history research is that there are so many different places to look for records and information. We have indexes and databases to help, of course, but we have to remember … Continue reading

One of the biggest challenges of doing genealogy and local history research is that there are so many different places to look for records and information.

We have indexes and databases to help, of course, but we have to remember to check each one separately so we don’t miss anything!

Luckily, we have LibGuides to help!

Compiled by your friendly neighborhood librarians (that’s would be us), LibGuides are useful resources that can make our collections more accessible to researchers near and far.

Our first LibGuide is for Genealogy and Local History Links. You can find it on our website under “Tips, Tricks & How-To’s”

LibGuideLinks

 

So far, the topics include cemetery research, church records, immigration/naturalization, land records, Rock Island Co. IL resources, Iowa resources, and vital records.

We’re also adding LibGuides all over our website!

Do you need to write a paper about a local historical figure or event? Want to know everything we have on a particular subject? You can find our list of Suggested Research Topics  on our website under “Tips, Tricks & How-To’s”.

SuggestedTopics

 

For each topic, you will find links to free online resources, books from our catalog, links to articles on our blog, photos from our collection, finding aids from our Archive & Manuscript collections, citations for items in our Ephemera files, brochures and lists compiled by Staff.

If you’re a student with a local history research assignment—or you’re helping one—these Topics can save you a lot of time:

LibGuide

 

Our intention is to have links and citations of all of our available resources for each topic in one place, so we can better assist our patrons with their research needs. These will be helpful for students working on National History Day projects as well as researchers everywhere interested in finding items in our collection.

Check back often, as we will continue to add LibGuides for more topics in the near future!

 

 

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Rhomberg’s: A Look Back at 80 Years of Fashion Forward http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/28/rhombergs-a-look-back-at-80-years-of-fashion-forward/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/28/rhombergs-a-look-back-at-80-years-of-fashion-forward/ Wed, 28 Jan 2015 16:13:37 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Rhomberg’s Fur and Leather Gallery, the last of the Quad-City furriers, recently announced that it will be going out of business, after nearly eighty years in Davenport. The family-owned retailer, which was established in Dubuque in 1907, was first listed … Continue reading
Davenport Democrat, 11Sept1949

Davenport Democrat, 11Sept1949

Rhomberg’s Fur and Leather Gallery, the last of the Quad-City furriers, recently announced that it will be going out of business, after nearly eighty years in Davenport.

Davenport Democrat, 25Sept1949

Davenport Democrat, 25Sept1949

The family-owned retailer, which was established in Dubuque in 1907, was first listed in the Davenport City directory in 1936, opening in a corner of the Kahl Building (336 W. 3rd Street).

The store remained there until 1953, when it boughtout another local furrier, Richter. The business, which took the name Richter-Rhomberg, moved to a roomier location at 219-221 West 2nd street.

In 1978, the store relocated to 213 West 2nd Street and went back to its original name. Rhomberg’s stayed downtown until 2001, when the business moved north to 4642 Brady Street.

Although its inventory expanded over the years to include leather goods and other types of high-quality clothing, the business was best known for selling, cleaning, and storing fur coats and accessories.

Many a Quad-City resident remembers that their mother or grandmother—or in one case, an uncle—depended on Rhomberg’s to take care of their best winter wear.

Rhomberg’s has been part of our community for the better part of a century and will continue to be a part of our fond memories.

Its closing is truly the end of an era.

Davenport Democrat, 5Oct1955

Davenport Democrat, 5Oct1955

 

(posted by Pat R.)

__________________

“Davenport furrier hits the century mark.” Quad City Times, 16February2008

 

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The St. Elizabeth’s Tragedy: Part II of II http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/21/the-st-elizabeths-tragedy-part-ii-of-ii/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/21/the-st-elizabeths-tragedy-part-ii-of-ii/ Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:44:06 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Please click here to read Part I. During the cold dark morning hours of January 7, 1950, St. Elizabeth’s, part of the Mercy Hospital Complex, had caught fire, placing 63 patients and 2 staff members in danger.* Before fire fighters and … Continue reading

Please click here to read Part I.

During the cold dark morning hours of January 7, 1950, St. Elizabeth’s, part of the Mercy Hospital Complex, had caught fire, placing 63 patients and 2 staff members in danger.*

Before fire fighters and police arrived, several people from the complex attempted to rescue patients from the burning building. They’d been stopped by the interior locked doors on the main floor as they tried to enter through the lobby.

Patients were seen in the windows trying to escape, but they, and their rescuers, were hampered by security bars. Several witnesses ran to Mercy Hospital’s maintenance room in hopes of getting a blow torch or saws to use on the bars. That room was locked and they were unable to gain entrance to the tools.

As firemen and police arrived they used their keys to attempt to open the window bars from the outside. Others went into the building through the basement doors and tried to go up that stairwell as the main lobby area was filled with smoke and fire.

In the middle of the building, a dumb waiter ran from the basement to the third floor. Rescuers who attempted to enter the basement reported to the Corner’s Jury Inquest that flames had been coming out of the dumb waiter, quickly preventing them from reaching the far side of the room to access the stairs to the upper floors in a rescue attempt.

The wind also hampered firefighting efforts that night. A strong wind blew smoke around the building making it hard to see patients in the windows. It also caused the fire to spread more quickly.

St. Elizabeth's on Fire with trucks

St. Elizabeth’s Fire. Photo courtesy of The Quad City Times.

Within twenty minutes of the arrival of the first fire truck, the blaze was out of control. Forty minutes after the first alarm, the entire structure was on fire. It took about two and a half hours for the fire to be put out. No other building on the property was lost.

The heavy loss of life came as no surprise: Forty patients and the night supervisor, Mrs. Anna Neal, died.  Mrs. Neal was found by firemen in a patient’s room on an upper floor. It appeared to the firemen that she had gone to help the other patients, but lost her own life in the process.

Only twenty-three patients and Nurse’s Aide Josephine O’Toole survived.

Davenport Police and Fire Departments and Iowa state investigators immediately began to search out the source of the fire and the reasons it had spread so quickly.

Hospital rumors began circulating that a female patient at St. Elizabeth’s claimed she had started the fire. The woman, who had been diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, had voluntarily entered St. Elizabeth’s as a patient on December 12, 1949 and was set to be released January 7th of 1950.

Later, her comments were reported at the Coroner’s Inquest.

In the early morning hours of January 7, 1950, the twenty-two year old female patient was in her room on the main floor of the building. In her possession was her husband’s silver lighter, inscribed with his initials; it had been missed during the routine bedtime search for cigarettes and matches.

On most nights her room had remained unlocked. Things changed that evening with the latching of her door: the evening nurse reported she had to secure the room during the bedtime check, as the woman kept leaving her room to go into other patients’ rooms.  The nurse was alone on duty and worried about the patient’s safety if she roamed while the nurse was caring for the patients on the upper floors. The evening nurse went off duty at 11:30 p.m. and was not involved in the fire.

The patient stated that she had looked out of her window and had seen her husband being held against his will in the building across the way. She tried to get his attention, but could not. She also could not leave her room as the door had been latched, which added to her fears.

At about 2:00 a.m., the patient used the lighter to light a newspaper on fire. She waved it in front of the window to attract help for her husband’s imagined plight. As she did so, her curtains caught fire.  She opened the window, inadvertently fanning the flames, and then went to her door and began to pound and call for help.

When Mrs. Neal opened the door, the patient first ran to another patient’s room to tell her to get out, then ran to the parlors near the lobby. The parlor door leading to the lobby was locked. The patient stated that she dropped the lighter and broke a glass door pane. She reached through the broken glass and opened the door from the other side, cutting her hand in the process.

She exited the building and was found walking outside. The patient was taken to the ER for stitches and began telling the staff that she had started the fire.

As the investigators continued to search for answers, they found evidence to support her story: a silver lighter with initials engraved on the bottom that matched the patient’s husband’s initials was located in the parlor area, not far from a door with a broken pane of glass and blood on a piece of glass and door jam.

Several witnesses stated the fire was first spotted coming from a window on the main floor just north of the fire escape on the east side of the building. The room belonged to the patient in question.

The Corner’s Jury Inquest led to the calling of a Grand Jury to determined whether the patient would be criminally charged with the deaths of forty-one persons.

The Grand Jury convened in the beginning of February 1950. Their findings matched those of the Corner’s Jury Inquest. The patient, who had been transferred to Mt. Pleasant State Hospital, had been declared insane by doctors.  Due to the declaration of insanity, a trial was not pursued.

The tragedy of the St. Elizabeth’s fire brought into focus the dangers of older public structures. The interior of the building was wood lathe and plaster construction with wood wainscoting in the rooms—all extremely flammable. The space between the plaster and exterior wall allowed the flames to travel quickly up to the attic area. It is believed that the open window allowed wind and air into the room that fed the fire. The door to the patient’s room was also likely left open which accounted for the flames traveling so quickly into the hallway.

By chance, the room in which the fire started also had an opening for the dumb waiter. The fire traveled quickly through the shaft, spreading in both directions to the upper floors and the basement.

Other factors that allowed for the spread of the fire included the uncapped chimney flues, which allowed flames easy access to the upper floors, while the fire fed off fresh paint and varnish which had been applied only a few months before.

The converted attic only had one stairway, narrowing the path of escape. The locked bars on the windows prevented those on the lower levels from leaving as well.

In addition, the decision had been made to delay the installation of a sprinkler system, for financial reasons.

St. Elizabeth Day After Fire

After the fire. January 7, 1950. Photo courtesy of The Quad City Times.

St. Elizabeth’s was never rebuilt. By 1955, Mercy Hospital decided that it would no longer provide long-term psychiatric care; St. Joseph’s, St. Elizabeth’s counterpart for male patients was torn down.

As for the deceased, sixteen bodies remained unclaimed after the fire. Some were too badly burned to identify and others had no family. These women were buried in Sacred Heart Cemetery on the Mercy Hospital grounds, alongside the Sisters of Mercy who had passed before them.

St. Elizabeth’s fire remains one of the greatest tragedies in Iowa history.

(Posted by Amy D.)

_______________________________

*The information in this post was obtained through the interviews conducted for the St. Elizabeth Hospital Fire Inquest – Microfilm 977.769 Cor.

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The St. Elizabeth’s Tragedy: Part I of II http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/14/the-st-elizabeths-tragedy-part-i-of-ii/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/14/the-st-elizabeths-tragedy-part-i-of-ii/ Wed, 14 Jan 2015 13:25:23 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In the early morning hours of January 7, 1950, as frigid winter temperatures were made harsher by a strong wind, Mercy Hospital night orderly Murray Francis noted an eerie light glowing outside. Shortly after 2:00 a.m., he activated an alarm. … Continue reading

In the early morning hours of January 7, 1950, as frigid winter temperatures were made harsher by a strong wind, Mercy Hospital night orderly Murray Francis noted an eerie light glowing outside. Shortly after 2:00 a.m., he activated an alarm.

St. Elizabeth’s was on fire.

St. Elizabeth's Summer 1949 Close Up

St. Elizabeth’s during the summer of 1949. The chimneys in the rear of the photo were part of the separate laundry building.
Photo courtesy of The Quad City Times.

St. Elizabeth’s was part of the Mercy Hospital complex in Davenport. Built around 1874, it housed psychiatric patients along with a few surgical patients when space was needed. St. Elizabeth’s was primarily used for female patients, while male patients resided in St. Joseph’s, which served a similar function.

Both buildings were four story structures. The basement was at ground level with an elevated main floor that was reached by walking up a flight of outdoor stairs to a lobby. Once inside the lobby there were interior doors that were kept locked at all times for patient security.

By 1950, the main floor housed parlors along with rooms for “acute” patients. These patients were staying in the hospital on a voluntarily bases for psychiatric needs or were post-surgical cases. The second and third floors (which when looking at the building from the outside would appear to be the third and fourth floors) housed long-term committed patients. The top floor was actually a converted attic with only one stairway to access it.

The interior of the 75 year old building had recently been freshened up during the summer of 1949 with new paint, new electrical wiring, and other updates. However, installation of a fire sprinkler system had been delayed due to finances.

The outside of the building looked similar to its earlier days. One physical change over the years had been the removal of two large chimneys that were taken down when a new heating system was installed. While the chimneys were removed from the exterior of the building, the interior chimney flues remained uncapped in the converted attic, which would prove to be a dangerous mistake, later.

For patient safety, bars had been installed on the windows of the upper three stories. The bars could only be unlocked from the outside. The nuns, nurses, and local fireman carried keys to unlock the bars in case of emergency.

St. Elizabeth’s was a self-contained unit that allowed patients to move about freely between their in-house therapy appointments.  For the most part, doors to the patient rooms were not locked at night except when needed for patient safety.

Patients were even allowed to smoke in their rooms or the parlors. The night nurse gathered the cigarettes and matches during final rounds and locked them away until the next day.

According to the book, From Simplicity to Elegance: The Story of Mercy Hospital, Davenport 1869-1994 by Sister Mary Brigid Condon (SC 362.11 Con) on the night of January 6, 1950, there were 63 patients in St. Elizabeth’s under the care of RN night supervisor Anna Neal. No other staff was on duty, though Miss Josephine O’Toole, an off-duty live-in nursing aide, was sleeping in her room on the second floor of the building. If there were any problems Mrs. Neal was to awaken Miss O’Toole for help.

But later, during the Scott County Coroner’s Jury Inquest,* Miss O’Toole testified that she was not awakened by Mrs. Neal on the morning of January 7th , but by the sounds of screams coming from elsewhere in the building,  shortly after 2:00 am.  As she left her third floor room, she reported, the hallway was already filling with smoke.

St. Elizabeth Entrance on Fire

Front entrance to St. Elizabeth’s. Note firemen from different departments fighting fire.
Photo courtesy of The Quad City Times.

Second Assistant Fire Chief Harry Lange reported to the Corner’s Jury Inquest that the first alarm call came into Central Fire Station at 2:06 a.m. Fireman Philip Axelrod stated to the Inquest he was part of Fire Engine Company 6, the first truck to arrive on scene a few minutes after the call came in.

Fireman Axelrod noted flames were shooting out of a window on the main floor just north of the fire escape on the east side of the building when his truck arrived. The flames were already reaching up to the roof from the outside. Two more fire engines arrived along with a ladder truck to the first alarm.

It was immediately apparent that extra resources were needed and a second alarm was called for additional trucks. That brought three more engines and another ladder truck to the scene. Soon a third and fourth alarm were called as the fire quickly spread throughout the building. Not only were fire fighters trying to rescue patients inside and put out the St. Elizabeth fire, but the surrounding buildings also needed protection from the flames. The two buildings in closest proximity to the fire were the hospital laundry and the convent.

Soon over one hundred fire fighters from all over the area were battling to not only put out the fire, but save the 63 patients trapped behind the iron bars and locked doors that prevented their escape as flames swept through the building.

_________________

*St. Elizabeth Hospital Fire Inquest – Microfilm 977.769 Cor . The Inquest took place on February 2 and 3, 1950.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Reviewing the Year in Review: a helpful short(ish)cut http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/05/reviewing-the-year-in-review-a-helpful-shortishcut/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2015/01/05/reviewing-the-year-in-review-a-helpful-shortishcut/ Mon, 05 Jan 2015 19:30:12 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Any historian or genealogist knows how useful newspapers can be.  These primary resources are a treasure trove of information, from announcements of births, marriages, deaths, and scandals, to reports of elections, entertainments, and probated wills. Newspapers can provide information on … Continue reading

Review of the Year 1922

Any historian or genealogist knows how useful newspapers can be.  These primary resources are a treasure trove of information, from announcements of births, marriages, deaths, and scandals, to reports of elections, entertainments, and probated wills.

Newspapers can provide information on almost anything—the tricky part is finding it, especially when no specific dates or subject indexes are available.

Our Special Collections Center has a variety of name and obituary indexes that provide good coverage for the Gazette and Davenport Democrat newspapers, but our  subject index for the Quad-City Times only runs from 1993 to the present.  We  subscribe to a historical newspaper database that allows keyword searching for earlier papers . . .  but there are still a lot of years that simply aren’t indexed or digitized, yet.

Lucky for us, Davenport newspapers usually published special Year-in-Review sections in either the last issue of the year or the first of the new one.

These sections act as sort of summary and index for the events of the year, big or small, and can be invaluable for researchers who are trying to find something in a year for which no separate subject index has been compiled.

They can help pinpoint the year—and even the month—that  a building was constructed . . . even if it wasn’t a “major”building:

Headlines Manufacturing  1Jan1922

 

They can provide financial information for the city (and on specific banks):

Headlines Financial  1Jan1922

 

They announce industrial advances, proposed developments, and business relocations:

Headlines Industrial  1Jan1922

They examine taxpayer’s money at work—and provide charts and photos:

Headlines Misc  1Jan1922

And can provide the number of births, marriages, and deaths in one convenient place:

Headlines Realty  1Jan1922

 

You can even get a look at the crimes, catastrophes and scandals for that particular year:

Headlines 1Jan1922
Going through these pages may not be as convenient as an index, but it still beats going through every page of an entire year of the newspaper—especially on microfilm!

Why not come in and try it out?

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Our “Special” visitors for 2014 http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/12/30/our-special-visitors-for-2014/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/12/30/our-special-visitors-for-2014/ Tue, 30 Dec 2014 08:00:59 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In 2014, genealogists and history researchers came from all over the country to the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center, to use our wonderful resources. We also had email and hone requests come in from all over the world! They came from … Continue reading

In 2014, genealogists and history researchers came from all over the country to the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center, to use our wonderful resources. We also had email and hone requests come in from all over the world!

They came from far away to fill in the blank branches of their Family Trees. They found copies of birth, marriage and death records of their Scott County, Iowa ancestors. They came to do research on the Iowa Soldiers’ Orphans’ Home, Colonel George Davenport and Bix Beiderbecke. They looked at newspaper articles on microfilm, online databases we subscribe to and our photograph collection. Their searches were made easier by the many indices that have been prepared by our volunteers from the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society.

Last year we had visitors and research requests from 38 states, Canada, Germany, France, Italy and Australia!

Our superlatives were: Avon Park, Florida, in the southeast and Edmonds, Washington, in the northwest. Or e-mail patrons were from as far away as Treviglio, Italy, in the northeast; and Darlington, South Australia, which is almost as southwest as one can go!

Check out this map with all of our visitors for the year 2014, as recorded in our Guest Book. Pretty cool, huh?

We thank our patrons for visiting us this past year. We hope to see you again soon!

And if you came in to visit but did not sign our guest book, let us know in the comments, so we can add you to our map!

Are you planning to visit us this year? We look forward to helping you!

(posted by Cristina)

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Holiday Hotel Menus – 1895 Dining http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/12/23/holiday-hotel-menus-1895-dining/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2014/12/23/holiday-hotel-menus-1895-dining/ Tue, 23 Dec 2014 12:23:33 -0600 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections This past Thanksgiving we explored new and interesting recipes to prepare for a holiday meal. We still wonder if anyone created some of the dishes we suggested. If not, there is still time to shop for ingredients to surprise your … Continue reading

This past Thanksgiving we explored new and interesting recipes to prepare for a holiday meal. We still wonder if anyone created some of the dishes we suggested. If not, there is still time to shop for ingredients to surprise your guests come Christmas.

If you are too tired to make some of those delicacies there is always the option for dining out. Even in the past, some individuals chose to eat out for their holiday meal. Hotels were well-known for their elaborate feasts. The menus printed in the newspapers along with the names of guests and local residents who partook of the feast.

The Davenport Daily Leader from December 27, 1895 covered the holiday festivities on the front page that year. It listed gatherings for children and dances for older adults among the ongoing amusements that holiday season.

Local hotel holiday menus were also reviewed in the article. Following are the menus for three local hotels with original spelling in the transcription.

____ 

The Hotel Downs

Boston Clam Chowder.

Olives.              Lettuce.

Boiled Columbia Salmon, Oyster Sauce.

Celery.             Sliced Tomatoes.

Westphalia Ham and Spinach.

Sirloin of Prime Rib, au Jus – Horse Radish.

Young Turkey, Oyster Dressing.

Domestic Goose with Apple Sauce.

Braised Sweet Breads with French Peaches.

Asparagus on Toast.

Cream Puffs.

Baked Sweet Potatoes.       Mashed Potatoes.

Boiled Onions.

Green Peas.           Sugar Corn.

Lobster Salad, au Mayonnaise.

Plum Pudding, Hard or Brandy Sauce.

Mince Pie.             Custard Pie.

Vanilla Ice Cream.              Assorted Cake.

Mixed Nuts.          Layer Raisins.

Cream Cheese.     Bents Crackers.

Green Tea.            Ceylon Tea.          Oolong Tea.

____

The Kimball House

Blue Points.

Crème de Volaide.               Green Turtle, Clear.

Almonds.               Olives Farcies.      Celery.   Radishes.

Croustades of Fresh Mushrooms.

Broiled Pompano, Maitre D’Hotel.

Cucumbers.

Roast Sirloin of Beef.

Mashed Potatoes.                                Stringless Beans.

Turkey, Stuffed with Chestnuts, Cranberry Sauce.

Browned Sweet Potatoes.                  Asparagus.

Loin of Venison, Current Jelly.

New Peas.

Breast of Teal Duck, Ponchartrain.

Lobster, Newburg.

Punch Matasbuino.

Partridge, Truffled, Bread Sauce.

Chicory and Tomato.

Plum Pudding.          Mince Pie.             Pumpkin Pie.

Neapolitaine Ice Cream.      Assorted Cake.

Fruit.       Confectionary.     Charlotte Russe.

Roquefort Cheese.

Coffee.

____

The St. James

New York Counts.

Consommé of Chicken.     Green Turtle.

Baked Columbia River Salmon, Wine Sauce.

Pommes de Tefre au Larded.

Olives.    Celery.   Lettuce.

Young Radishes.            Young Onions.

Boiled Capon, Egg Sauce.

Haunch of Venison with Jelly.

Saimi of Blue Wing Teal aux Petit Pois.

Broiled Young Fox Squirrel on Toast.

Wild Goose, a la Tip Toe.

Steamed Apple Dumplings, Hard Sauce.

Prime Ribs of Beef, au Jus.                Yorkshire Pudding.

Turkey Stuffed, Cranberry Sauce.

Roast Lamb, with Mint Sauce.

Suckling Pig, Apple Sauce.

Christmas Punch.

Mashed Potatoes.                      Spinnach.

Sweet Potatoes.                    Hubbard Squash.

Asparagus Toast.

Chicken Salad.

English Plum Pudding, Brandy or Hard Sauce.

Home Made Mince Pie.     Lemon Pie.

Vanilla Ice Cream.

Wine Jelly.             Edam and Cream Cheese, Brand Jelly.

Angel Food.               Fruit Cake.            Assorted Cake.

French Kisses.        Gruit.

Tea.        Coffee.       Milk.       Buttermilk.

____

We assume that no one left these meals hungary. We think the Wild Goose, a la Tip Toe will require some further research by staff to find out how it was prepared.

Hopefully your holiday meal, whether prepared at home or in a restaurant, will be as wonderful and filling as the items mentioned above.

And as always, we encourage you to try a few of these ideas and let us know how they turn out if you do!

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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