Davenport Public Library Blog Feeds http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/allfeeds Combined RSS feeds for all Davenport Public Library blogs en-us Copyright 2011-2017 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Davenport City Cemetery: Preserving and celebrating the past http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/26/davenport-city-cemetery-preserving-and-celebrating-the-past/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/26/davenport-city-cemetery-preserving-and-celebrating-the-past/ Fri, 26 May 2017 14:18:35 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In honor of National Cemetery Month and Memorial Day, we are taking a moment to highlight the history of Davenport City Cemetery and this Saturday’s dedication of headstones for veterans of the Civil and Spanish-American Wars. Located on Rockingham Road between South … Continue reading

Davenport City Cemetery est. 1849

In honor of National Cemetery Month and Memorial Day, we are taking a moment to highlight the history of Davenport City Cemetery and this Saturday’s dedication of headstones for veterans of the Civil and Spanish-American Wars.

Located on Rockingham Road between South Sturdevant Street and South Division Street, City Cemetery is the oldest existing cemetery in Davenport.

The original five acres of land were purchased from Asa and Electa Green on May 10, 1843 by the City of Davenport. The sale of private burial lots began in September of that year. A section of the cemetery was also designated as Public Burial ground where families could choose to either bury a loved one themselves for a small fee or pay a slightly higher amount for the Sexton to dig the grave.*

Many of the individuals buried in the Public Ground may have only had small handmade markers that have vanished over time due to Midwestern weather, flooding, or vandalism. Today this section (on the east side of the cemetery) looks like an open green space, but is actually the burial ground for hundreds.

In 1849, the descendants of Asa and Electa Green sold an additional 6.48 acres of adjoining land to the City of Davenport to expand the cemetery. In January of 1863, he first lot was sold in the “New,”or west, section of the cemetery.

Over the years, City Cemetery became the final resting place for thousands of local citizens including:

  • Early German immigrants to the area
  • Members of successful families whose last names are still recognized in Davenport today (such as the Beiderbecke family)
  • Some infamous by association (Dr. Michael and Catherine Horony, the father and stepmother of western legend Mary Katherine “Big Nose Kate” Horony)
  • Victims of cholera and other epidemics
  • Veterans who fought for the United States at home or overseas

The last burial in City Cemetery is believed to have taken place around 1986. The cemetery is no longer managed by a Sexton; it is now under the care of the City of Davenport Parks and Recreation Department.

Though the burials have ended, caring and maintaining the cemetery for those who rest there and their families has not.

The Davenport Parks & Recreation Department and a group of dedicated volunteers continue to make improvements to the cemetery. From road and walkway improvements to the replacement of missing or damaged headstones, their work helps preserve the history of Davenport and Scott County.

The newest contribution to the preservation of the cemetery is the unveiling and dedication of 20 headstones for veterans of the Civil War and one headstone for a veteran of the Spanish-American War. The dedication ceremony will take place on Saturday, May 27, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. The public is invited to attend this event, which is being coordinated through the Veterans Recruitment and Services at St. Ambrose University.

The headstones were received for free through the Department of Veterans Affairs program. Volunteers Kory Darnall and Coky Powers spent hours going through burial information to identify veterans, searching for supporting documents, and working with the Davenport Parks & Recreation Department to submit all the requiried materials to the program.

In addition to the dedication at 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, there will be volunteers available Saturday through Monday, May 27, 28, and 29 from 12 to 4 p.m. to answer questions and discuss the history of the cemetery.

We hope to see you there!

*A City of Davenport Ordinance passed May 10, 1849 stated graves must be dug 5 feet in depth and length to allow a coffin or rough box to buried. The Sexton was paid by the City Council $2 for the burial of a person 11 years or older, $1.50 for ages 2 – 10, and $1.00 for ages 0 – 2.  An additional dollar was charged for digging a grave at night. Friends or relatives were allowed to dig a grave themselves as long as they stayed within the above-given dimensions. The Sexton received a $ .50 recording fee for those burials.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/radiant-child-the-story-of-young-artist-jean-michel-basquiat/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/radiant-child-the-story-of-young-artist-jean-michel-basquiat/ Fri, 26 May 2017 06:00:01 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe “You have the best kids books!”, exclaimed a library patron with her son in tow. Smiling, I thanked the patron and stole a quick glance of the title in her hand. Javaka Steptoe’s Caldecott award-winning Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat  is as beautiful as you might[Read more]

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat“You have the best kids books!”, exclaimed a library patron with her son in tow. Smiling, I thanked the patron and stole a quick glance of the title in her hand. Javaka Steptoe’s Caldecott award-winning Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat  is as beautiful as you might expect a book about Jean-Michel Basquiat to be. What is particularly unique about this book, in addition to the messages it conveys, is that Steptoe’s illustrations emulate the kind of street art you might find Basquiat himself producing in New York in the 1980s on various organic textures & surfaces. The book itself is a literal work of art.

The dominant message Javaka conveys in this book is simple: imperfection is beauty.  Is this not an important and timeless message that we can and should celebrate and teach? Adults and children alike stand to benefit simply by acknowledging this pure and simple wisdom. Determined to create a masterpiece, the narrator notes that young artist Jean-Michel’s pictures “are sloppy, ugly, and sometimes weird” but they are nonetheless “still beautiful”. I’ll definitely be reading this book to Pebbles, my 8 year-old Blue Heeler dog since I don’t have any human children. I’m a dog mom — does that count? Also, Pebbles embraces the “imperfection is beauty” credo because she likes to rip holes in comforters and knock the trash can over. She gets it.  But in total seriousness, spread the aforementioned important message! (Especially in today’s Black Mirror world in which the bizarre expectation and practice is that the images we project of ourselves on social media are disproportionately perfect, happy, and overflowing with rainbows and unicorns). Let us remember that what is flawed is real. Even more?: what is flawed is beautifully and uniquely human.

Other representations of Jean-Michel Basquiat are also available at Davenport Public Library if you’re interested in learning more about this fascinating and legendary artist! For example, check out the 2002 film entitled Basquiat  that features David Bowie, Gary Oldman, Benecio del Toro and others alongside Jeffrey Wright who plays the unforgettable part of Jean-Michel. (The late great David Bowie, playing the role of the quirky and iconic Andy Warhol easily makes Basquiat one of my absolutely favorite films.) One particular scene in this film perfectly summarizes the idea that imperfection is beauty when Jean-Michel takes a paintbrush to his girlfriend’s new dress because he thought “it needed something”. In short, this film does an excellent job of illustrating 1980s Brooklyn and how Basquiat went being homeless to a wildly successful artist overnight. Sadly, and as is the case with so many inimitable artists of our generation, however, Basquiat struggled with a drug addiction that would derail him and his career.  What Basquiat left behind–his legacy–is far greater and more memorable then any of the challenges he endured in his lifetime.

Also amazing? Check out Life Doesn’t Frighten Me, a book of poetry by the amazing Maya Angelou with illustrations by the one and only Jean-Michel Basquiat!

http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ Let’s hit the streets! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lets-hit-the-streets/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/lets-hit-the-streets/ Wed, 24 May 2017 06:00:04 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Are you ever curious what people are actually reading? If you’re like me, you see all the books that people are checking out from the library or are buying at bookstores and you wonder if they are really reading those books or not. I know that most of the books[Read more]

Are you ever curious what people are actually reading? If you’re like me, you see all the books that people are checking out from the library or are buying at bookstores and you wonder if they are really reading those books or not. I know that most of the books that I check out just sit on my shelf until I either return them to put another hold on them or I renew them for another 3 weeks of book shelf sitting. It’s a little frustrating.

While I was poking around on the internet one night before bed, I found CoverSpy. CoverSpy is a Tumblr put together by people roaming around New York looking for people reading. These ‘agents’, as they call themselves, wander into bars, parks, subways, and streets to take note of the cover of the books being read and what the person reading looks like. They also have groups in Vancouver, BC, Omaha, Portland, Seattle, Los Angeles, Milwaukee, Montreal, Barcelona, Boston, Chicago, and Washington, DC that do the same.

CoverSpy caught my interest because instead of posting pictures of the people reading, which vaguely creeps me out because it makes me super self-conscious when I read in public, CoverSpy just posts the cover and a little description of the person reading. And it’s not just books adults are reading! It’s coloring books, kid’s books, cookbooks, how-to manuals, etc. Anything that looks like a book or that could be counted as reading material (BESIDES e-readers and magazines) count!

Each post is set up like the one above. I love scrolling through the list because the description of the person reading can get pretty funny.

This website veers away from traditional book recommendation sites that pull their source information from librarians or book reviewers. Instead CoverSpy pulls anonymously from people who are actually out reading in public. If you don’t find your next read on these site, no big deal. At least you were entertained and maybe laughed a bit.

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Let Food Be Your Medicine by Don Colbert http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/let-food-be-your-medicine-by-don-colbert/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/let-food-be-your-medicine-by-don-colbert/ Mon, 22 May 2017 06:00:52 -0500 Erin at Info Cafe Physician-turned-journalist Don Colbert, MD offers intriguing and practical advice for optimum nutrition and wellness in Let Food Be Your Medicine: Dietary Changes Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease. Early on, Colbert shares the deceptively simple insight that we catch colds but we develop chronic diseases like Type II Diabetes or[Read more]
Let Food Be Your Medicine: Dietary Changes Proven to Prevent or Reverse Disease

Physician-turned-journalist Don Colbert, MD offers intriguing and practical advice for optimum nutrition and wellness in Let Food Be Your Medicine: Dietary Changes Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease. Early on, Colbert shares the deceptively simple insight that we catch colds but we develop chronic diseases like Type II Diabetes or Cardiovascular disease. That is not a coincidence, either. In Latin, “Dis” refers to being “apart”, disjointed, or having a negative or “reversing force.” Ease refers “freedom from pain” or being in a tranquil or peaceful state. In essence, disease signifies a breaking away from a peaceful or tranquil state. The process of developing and solidifying disease, however,  is complex and involves lifestyle & environmental factors, as well as the interplay of all systems of mind, body, and spirit.

I tend to gobble up books about food, nutrition, and wellness and am naturally obsessed with how the gut or the “microbiome”, i.e. the ecosystem living in the core of your body, is more powerful and influential over our general health & well-being than we once imagined. A discussion about the microbiome is another conversation entirely and is far beyond my scope of knowledge; but Colbert does not overlook discussing current research about the delicate ecosystem living between our brain and bowel. How curious that we may even begin to view our food cravings as tiny demands from the bacteria in our guts who have lives of their own? In essence, we are feeding them. You better believe they don’t always have your best interests in mind, either. The little “voices in your head” (or, gut, in this case) take on a whole new meaning. Read this book to dig in a little deeper as to how and why our microbiome is so influential and critical to our overall health.

Colbert mixes testimonial with current medical evidence to present a compelling argument for being mindful and deliberative when it comes to what we put into our bodies. Learn about his struggle with autoimmune disorders and how his quest to heal himself resulted in weeding nightshade foods (peppers, eggplants, tomatoes) out of his diet. Not all food is equal in its ability to nourish, heal, or harm, either, as you may know. We often take for granted that we do not innately know what foods are harmful or helpful. Many of us grew up in homes in which our parent(s) worked and perhaps did not have the time to prepare and cook whole, nourishing meals all week long. In short, eating “healthy” is not common sense. Failure to meet your daily nutrient requirements or to altogether make harmful dietary choices is not therefore some testament to your lack of willpower. Quite simply, many of us have to learn how to make better food choices, and that starts with education. If you have any curiosity whatsoever in how you can better yourself simply by changing what you put into your body, read this book.

This book is not a fix-all for all that ails you, nor does it substitute for the relationship you have with your primary care physicians or doctors. Part of what is working about healthcare is that we acknowledge that wellness involves the alignment of mind, body, and spirit or the non-physical part of a human being. Grey’s Anatomy sums up the dilemma well in one episode in which Dr. Preston Burke, esteemed neurosurgeon, argues with Dr. Cristina Yang that nurturing a  patient’s spiritual state is equally as important as the medical intervention being performed, for the reason that human beings are not merely physical bodies. The non-physical parts of us require care and respect, too. Though Colbert’s book does not discuss the role of spirituality in health in great depth, he no-doubt weaves his own faith into the book (but it is not oft-putting for non-Christians). I can most certainly recall a time in my lifespan of thirty-six years when the words “soul”, “spirituality” and “Ayurveda” would have never made an appearance in a discussion about disease, illness, or health & wellbeing. But today? We are becoming more interdisciplinary & holistic in how we not only view but “treat” illness — and how we care for whole human beings (not just symptoms).

If you are even the slightest bit curious about how food can harm or heal, read this book. If you would be amazed by the prospect of eating a diet that custom made to fight diabetes, Alzheimer’s, heart disease, cancer, auto-immune disorders — read this book. Believe it or not, one of the most powerful statements that Colbert makes in this book is this: cancer, depending upon the type and staging, can and  very well does constitute a chronic disease that can actually be managed like other chronic diseases not unlike COPD, heart disease, and diabetes. I don’t know about you, but aside from a cure that’s the very best next thing!  Bear in mind, Colbert is not claiming to have a cure for cancer; but he lays out, in one case, a diet plan that is tailored not only to the cancer patient but to the specific stage of cancer in order to increase the chances of putting the cancer into remission…and we can do this with vegetables, micronutrients, plants–with the plentitude of healing, delicious foods that are available to us should we be inclined.

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Extra! Extra! Read All About It! Now Available: The Port Byron Globe Newspaper http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/19/extra-extra-read-all-about-it-now-available-the-port-byron-globe-newspaper/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/19/extra-extra-read-all-about-it-now-available-the-port-byron-globe-newspaper/ Fri, 19 May 2017 12:58:10 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is pleased to announce the acquisition of the weekly newspaper the Port Byron Globe (Port Byron, IL, 1884-1992) on microfilm! Delve into the lives of Port Byron, Illinois residents and their Scott County neighbors across the Mississippi in … Continue reading

The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center is pleased to announce the acquisition of the weekly newspaper the Port Byron Globe (Port Byron, IL, 1884-1992) on microfilm!

Delve into the lives of Port Byron, Illinois residents and their Scott County neighbors across the Mississippi in Le Claire and Princeton, Iowa as far back as 1884!

Print indexes to the Port Byron Globe are also available to researchers at the Center. The Rock Island County Historical Society compiled an obituary index to the March 8, 1884 through August 12, 1971 issues; and two volumes (12 and 16) of local genealogy enthusiast Janet Pease’s Genealogical Abstracts from Rock Island County, Illinois Newspapers contain indexes to “all items which I felt to be of genealogical value – vital records, visits from out-of-town relatives, probate abstracts, marriage licenses…” for 1890 through 1897.

Take home a little Port Byron area history free of charge using our digital microfilm reader-printers and your storage device!

We are grateful to Mr. and Mrs. M. Lawrence Shannon for donating this wonderful resource to our collection.

(posted by Karen)

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Author Name Pronunciation Guide http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/author-name-pronunciation-guide/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/author-name-pronunciation-guide/ Fri, 19 May 2017 06:00:17 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe Let me introduce you to my FAVORITE library resource: TeachingBooks.net, particularly the section entitled Author Name Pronunciation Guide. This section has saved me multiple times! Have you ever wondered how to say an author’s name? Maybe you’ve been saying it one way, you hear a friend say it another way,[Read more]

Let me introduce you to my FAVORITE library resource: TeachingBooks.net, particularly the section entitled Author Name Pronunciation Guide. This section has saved me multiple times! Have you ever wondered how to say an author’s name? Maybe you’ve been saying it one way, you hear a friend say it another way, and then you start second-guessing yourself? I do this all. the. time. So confusing. This problem is just like when you say a word out-loud that you have only ever read before just to have someone correct you and say that you’re pronouncing it wrong. Super annoying, right? Well, lucky for all of us the Author Name Pronunciation Guide at TeachingBooks.net exists. We’ll all become expert author name pronunciators and can spread our knowledge to others! Sounds perfect.

Now let’s find out where the Author Name Pronunciation Guide is! Go to TeachingBooks.net. On the home page in the banner bar at the top of the page, click Author & Book Resources.

That will bring you to a page that looks like the one below! Click on Audio Name Pronunciations.

Viola! Now you’re at the Author Name Pronunciation Guide which hopefully will start off with the following paragraph.

As you’re scrolling through that page, you’ll notice thousands of author names. My favorite one to have people play around with is Jon Scieszka because 1) I NEVER say his name right, even though I know about this guide and 2) kids ask for his books all the time and therefore are already familiar with this author. Anyway, scroll through the list and find his name (it’s alphabetical by last name). Once you click on it, a page with all his info will pop up! (Sorry for the tiny print.)

If you click on the orange play button, you’ll hear Jon Scieszka pronounce his name and talk some more. It’s awesome. It also connects you to author’s personal websites and their own page on TeachingBooks.net. Now play around and find out how to pronounce some author names! It’s definitely one of my favorite not-well-known librarian resources.

I also encourage you to click around the regular TeachingBooks.net site because there are a ton of other really good resources there. Who knows, maybe I’ll blog about them in the future!

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Astronomy Photographer of the Year: Prize-Winning Images by Top Astrophotographers http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year-prize-winning-images-by-top-astrophotographers/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/astronomy-photographer-of-the-year-prize-winning-images-by-top-astrophotographers/ Wed, 17 May 2017 06:00:33 -0500 Brenda at Info Cafe Take a deep breath – then, open this book. Astronomy Photographer of the Year : Prize-winning Images by Top Astrophotographers will transport you. Every year since 2009, the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London, England hosts an Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition. Entries are collected in the spring. Winning exhibitions are displayed[Read more]

Take a deep breath – then, open this book. Astronomy Photographer of the Year : Prize-winning Images by Top Astrophotographers will transport you.

Every year since 2009, the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London, England hosts an Astronomy Photographer of the Year Competition. Entries are collected in the spring. Winning exhibitions are displayed at the Royal Observatory September to June. This book is a compilation of the best from the first six years of that contest.

It is hard to believe these images were not captured by the Hubble telescope, but rather by amateur astrophotographers on earth. Flip through the pages of this heavy book and find eyeball-shaped nebula staring back at you from a background of innumerable stars. Feel a shiver as you take in an image of a snowy night with Aurora Borealis coloring the sky in purple and green. Ponder how tiny you are compared to all the galaxies out there. It always fills me with wonder to see images of galaxies and nebulae that resemble eyes or other body parts. I think the one displayed on the cover of this book looks rather like a heart, don’t you?

Some photos, such as the ones tracing the sun’s position in the sky over nearly a year made me wonder aloud, “How did they capture that?!?” The collection is even more remarkable when you consider that some contest entries were submitted by people who have only been practicing astronomy photography less than a year. There are special categories for those who have not entered the competition before, as well as a youth category for ages 15 and younger. You can learn more about the contest at the Royal Museums website.

 

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Online Reading Challenge – Halfway Through May http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-halfway-through-may/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/online-reading-challenge-halfway-through-may/ Mon, 15 May 2017 06:00:01 -0500 Ann at Info Cafe Hello Fellow Traveling Readers! How is Kenya treating you this month? Because the selection of books about or set in Kenya is pretty slim, probably the hardest part of this challenge is finding a book that interests you. Don’t give up – there are some excellent ones that are well[Read more]

Hello Fellow Traveling Readers!

How is Kenya treating you this month? Because the selection of books about or set in Kenya is pretty slim, probably the hardest part of this challenge is finding a book that interests you. Don’t give up – there are some excellent ones that are well worth the search! (see this post for some suggestions)

Of course, because of the lack of Library Police, there is no rule that says you can’t read a book set in a different African country. Or different country from anywhere for that matter. However, if you’d like to stick with the African continent, there are some amazing books.

Travel to Botswana with any of the titles in the delightful No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency series by Alexander McCall Smith. These fun and charming books follow Mma Precious Ramotswe as she untangles the various problems of her clients with wisdom and humor. Her love of Botswana and its people shines throughout. There’s also a beautifully done television series which originally ran on HBO.

The Congo, with it’s dark history, has inspired some outstanding books including The Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, a journey into the African wilderness and the human heart. I would also recommend The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver about a fire-and-brimstone preacher who brings his family to the Congo to be a missionary. The book is elegant and thoughtful and absolutely devastating.

If you want to explore South Africa, there is no better place to start than with Nelson Mandela. Look in the Biography section alphabetical under Mandela for books about this man’s remarkable life. For a classic, try Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton about a black man’s country under white man’s law, written with dignity, courage and love. Or check out the Tannie Maria mysteries by Sally Andrews, set in rural South Africa. The first in the series, Recipes for Love and Murder, is filled with humor, romance and recipes (and a murder!)

What about you? What have you read this month?

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A Forgotten Oasis: The Pavilion at Central Park http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/12/a-forgotten-oasis-the-pavilion-at-central-park/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/12/a-forgotten-oasis-the-pavilion-at-central-park/ Fri, 12 May 2017 13:02:54 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections In May 1899, plans were unveiled for a new addition to Central Park (renamed Vander Veer Park in 1912). Architect E. S. Hammatt had been hired by the Davenport Park Commissioners to design an open-air structure to serve as a … Continue reading

In May 1899, plans were unveiled for a new addition to Central Park (renamed Vander Veer Park in 1912). Architect E. S. Hammatt had been hired by the Davenport Park Commissioners to design an open-air structure to serve as a bandstand and gathering area in the park.

The location for the new building was the northern edge of the park, just south of the greenhouse near the large pond. It was described in the newspapers as being 50 x 70 feet with enough space for large groups to gather. It was a story-and-a-half in height with bathrooms and storage areas in the lower section. The upper open-air section was accessible by large stairways on all four sides. (1)

The Pavilion at Central Park before a portion of the upper level was enclosed. Postcard #Parks VV PC 004.

Soon after the structure was built, the Park Commissioners decided to enclose the central part of the upper section and add a restaurant. (2)

 Large pond in the front and greenhouse to the right of the Pavilion. Postcard #Parks VV PC 036.

Closer postcard view of the Pavilion after changes to the upper level.  Postcard #Parks VV PC 029.

What a delight it must have been to sip a lemonade under the shade of the Pavilion and gaze out over the picturesque pond and greenhouse! 

In the annual report for 1919-1920the Park Commissioners informed the Davenport City Council that the “…decision to take down the pavilion in order to save coal, repairs and painting was carried out; the heating pipes and radiators were stored; the toilet fixtures moved to the basement in the Utility Building; the steel ceiling to the Comfort Station in Fejervary Park; the lumber, frames, doors and windows to Credit Island; the foundation stones to Fejervary Park and will be used for filling in the deer and elk yard.” (3)

We were amazed to find such a complete description of what happened to the building and its materials!

This final look at the Central Park Pavilion comes courtesy of our collection of images from the Hostetler Studio in Davenport:

Central Park Pavilion by Hostetler Studio, Davenport, Iowa. 1902 – 1918. Image hostetler-vanderveer1. DPL Volume 31.

Enjoy a relaxing summer at Vander Veer and other City of Davenport parks!

(posted by Amy D.)

____________________________________________________________

  • (1) Davenport Weekly Leader, May 16, 1899, p. 6.
  • (2) Davenport Daily Leader, July 2, 1899, p. 8.
  • (3) Annual Reports of The City Officers of the City of Davenport 1919 – 1920, p. 96.
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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-hate-u-give-by-angie-thomas/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/the-hate-u-give-by-angie-thomas/ Fri, 12 May 2017 06:00:11 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe I spend a lot of time reading review journals, magazines, and online blogs about books. This helps me to order the most current books for my sections and keeps me aware of other books that are coming out across the whole library. The Hate U Give came across my radar as a book to recommend to teens about gun violence. Based on[Read more]

I spend a lot of time reading review journals, magazines, and online blogs about books. This helps me to order the most current books for my sections and keeps me aware of other books that are coming out across the whole library. The Hate U Give came across my radar as a book to recommend to teens about gun violence. Based on all of the talk going around about this book and its relevance to the Black Lives Matter movement, I knew I needed to read The Hate U Give if just to try to understand the power this book has.

The Hate U Give is a MASSIVE New York Times and Amazon bestseller. If the title drives you grammar nerds a little crazy, Thomas has reasons for it. The Hate U Give comes from the acronym THUG LIFE that Tupac Shakar had tattooed across his abdomen. It stands for “The hate u give little infants f**** everybody”. (If you’re offended by that word, I strongly suggest you don’t read this book. It doesn’t shy away from violence and language.) That acronym runs rampant throughout The Hate U Give and the main characters keep returning to it. It’s important. Now let’s get down to what this book is about.

The Hate U Give tells the story of Starr.  By the time she is sixteen, Starr has seen both of her best friends die as a result of gun violence: one by a gang drive-by and the other just recently fatally shot by a cop. Starr was out at a party, something she never does, when shots rang out. She and her friend Khalil took off running to his car. On their way home, they are stopped by the police, pulled over, and Khalil is shot and killed. (Obviously there’s more to the story, but I don’t want to give too many spoilers!) Starr is the only witness to Khalil’s fatal shooting by that police officer. This fact causes her a great deal of agony. Does she speak up? Obviously her parents and the cops know that she witnessed his death, but does she tell her friends? How will she react when the story is plastered all over the news? What will she do if the district attorney contacts her or if the cops want to interview her? Starr wants to stand up for Khalil, but she is afraid. How will she react if people start telling lies about Khalil? She just doesn’t know what to do.

Starr has grown up in the rough area of Garden Heights, but with a solid family backing her up. Her mother works as a nurse in a clinic and desperately wants to move away to protect the family. Her father, known as Big Mav, is a former gang-member who took the fall for King, a notorious gang lord in the community, and spent three years in prison when Starr was younger. Now Big Mav owns the local grocery store and is working to make the community better. Starr doesn’t go to the local high school; instead she goes to Williamson, a private school in a more affluent neighborhood where instead of being a black majority, she’s one of only two black kids in her school. Starr constantly talks about her Williamson self and her Garden Heights self. They’re kept separate and each Starr acts different. Her Williamson friends and her Garden Heights friends hardly ever mix. This is a life that Starr has kind of adjusted to, but the slightest bump to her normal life could cause her world to come crashing down. Khalil’s death rocks her world and Starr soon finds herself and her family the target of the police and King, the local drug lord, as everyone puts pressure on her and intimidates her in order to figure out what really happened the night that Khalil died.

The author, Angie Thomas, began writing in response to the fatal shooting in Oakland, California in 2009 of 22-year-old Oscar Grant. She quickly found the subject too painful, so Thomas set the book aside. After the stories of Trayvon Martin and Tamir Rice broke the news, Thomas knew she had to start writing this book again. Thomas had to voice her opinions, had to acknowledge the neighborhood where she grew up, and needed to shine a light on Black Lives Matter. The themes of social justice, opinion, responsibility, existing in two worlds, and violence are so prevalent and deeply explored in this book because Thomas knows what she is talking about. She lived it.

This book has been optioned for a film and is in development. I can only hope that the movie is just as moving as the book was. The movie has the opportunity to further change the world.

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Black Irish by Stephan Talty http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/black-irish-by-stephan-talty/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/black-irish-by-stephan-talty/ Tue, 09 May 2017 06:00:05 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe I have a fascination with serial murderers, the grislier the better. I snatch up books about them as quick as I can, but veer away from television shows because they seem too formulaic and predictable. The books that I have read/listened to recently have all been reliably gritty and suspenseful.[Read more]

I have a fascination with serial murderers, the grislier the better. I snatch up books about them as quick as I can, but veer away from television shows because they seem too formulaic and predictable. The books that I have read/listened to recently have all been reliably gritty and suspenseful. I stumbled upon Black Irish by Stephan Talty a week ago and loved it.

Black Irish is delightfully gruesome and mysterious. Absalom ‘Abbie’ Kearney is a detective in South Buffalo. Even though her adoptive father is a revered cop, Abbie is considered to be an outsider in this working-class Irish American area because of her dark hair, druggie mother, mysterious father, Harvard degree, and a myriad of other reasons. Her troubled past makes her current life in South Buffalo difficult as she works to earn the trust and respect of everyone in ‘the County’. The County is full of fiercely secretive citizens who look out for their own and shun outsiders. Digging for the truth or trying to find out about her past is nearly impossible for Abbie without the help from accepted local Irish good-ol’-boy cops and detectives. Because of this, Abbie works even harder to prove herself to be more than capable and worthy of her badge, much to the chagrin of the locals.

When a mangled corpse is found in a local church’s basement, the very church that Abbie herself attended, the County finds itself unnerved. A message seems to sweep through the area. While Abbie is the lead detective on the case and is running the investigation, she finds that other detectives, and more importantly the locals, are taking it upon themselves to solve the case. The code of silence and secrecy that began in Ireland still exists in the County, making Abbie’s search for the killer even more difficult. This secrecy stonewalls her everywhere she goes, even at the Gaelic Club which her father frequents. Shaking down leads is difficult and Abbie soon finds herself receiving vicious threats and warnings.

The killer has a clear signature and with each passing day, Abbie thinks she is getting closer. With more people murdered, Abbie finds this case consuming her. While working to solve these crimes, the killer is slowly circling closer and closer to Abbie, until finally dropping into her life. Abbie is left to dig into her own past, her family’s past, how everything is related to the County, and also how the County’s secrets just may end up destroying everything in which the whole community believes.

This book hooked me from the start. The narrator uses different accents for each character which made them all easy to follow. Stephan Talty has woven a masterful examination into the cone of silence in closed off neighborhoods, even when that code hides dangerous, murderous pasts and people. I greatly enjoyed this book and can’t wait for more.


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We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/we-were-the-lucky-ones-by-georgia-hunter/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/we-were-the-lucky-ones-by-georgia-hunter/ Mon, 08 May 2017 06:00:49 -0500 Lynn at Info Cafe We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter is the story of the Kurc family and their experiences  during World War II. This novel is actually the story of her family, and she uses the real names of her grandparents, mother, aunts, uncles and cousins. I was struck by the[Read more]

We Were the Lucky Ones by Georgia Hunter is the story of the Kurc family and their experiences  during World War II. This novel is actually the story of her family, and she uses the real names of her grandparents, mother, aunts, uncles and cousins.

I was struck by the similarity of phrase, when reading an account in the April 24th issue of The Dispatch  and The Rock Island Argus  of a speech by Doris Fogel.  During Holocaust Remembrance week,  Ms. Fogel, a Chicago resident who spent years in a Shanghai ghetto during World War II, said: “No one could have foretold the horror and hardship the coming years would bring to millions of Jews and others,” … “Every day, I realized I was one of the lucky ones.”

The Kurcs are from a small town in Poland, and as the war goes on they see their lives and homes disintegrate. Some are forced to live in ghettos and  concentration camps, some are sent to a Siberian gulag. The “luckiest”  is Addy who is living in Paris when the war starts, and he cannot get back home to Poland, and he can’t let them know where he is. Finally, he gets a visa to Brazil. After the war, the Red Cross is able to connect those who survive and the extended family emigrates to Brazil, where Addy can help them rebuild. They’ve lost their homes, identities, friends, belongings, savings, and occupations, but in the end they still have their family and faith.

Survivors were left in limbo after the war. Hunter describes in realistic detail the rules, regulations and laws involved in getting visas, and the rigors and dangers of travel – both during and after the war. I was unfamiliar with the level of atrocity in Poland and how, even after the war, Jews were still  persecuted in Germany.

Hunter personalizes the horror of what so many suffered. It’s hard to comprehend the scope of what happened and how many millions of stories there are that have been lost. The reader gets a small sense of this by following the members of the Kurc family as they, incrementally, have everything taken from them. Another tragedy is losing so many stories – as the last several generations pass away, along with their first-person accounts.

 

 

 

 

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Woman of God by James Patterson http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/woman-of-god-by-james-patterson/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/reference/woman-of-god-by-james-patterson/ Fri, 05 May 2017 06:00:01 -0500 Stephanie at Info Cafe As I mentioned in one of my earlier blog posts, I’m slowly making my way through big name authors in adult fiction. There are so many books available to read that I know I will never have time to read them all, so I have been utilizing my driving time by listening to audio books.[Read more]

As I mentioned in one of my earlier blog posts, I’m slowly making my way through big name authors in adult fiction. There are so many books available to read that I know I will never have time to read them all, so I have been utilizing my driving time by listening to audio books. By doing so, I can listen to one book while I’m driving and read another one when I’m not! Two books at once!

Woman of God by James Patterson was my latest listen. I checked this book out based primarily on the description that I read in OverDrive. The summary listed details the selection of a new Pope in Rome, an occurrence that would normally garner major attention on a normal day, but this time there are rumors that the new Pope could be a woman. This news rocks the world as the woman candidate is not like any other priest in the Catholic Church’s history. Sounds interesting, right? I thought so and then promptly checked it out.

This book made me cry and I’m not talking about little tears escaping from the corner of my eyes. I’m talking about crocodile tears and heartbreak. Woman of God begins with a prologue. Brigid Fitzgerald is rumored to be the new pope, a fact that has led dozens of reporters and thousands of people to descend on her doorstep and her church. She is worried about the safety of her daughter and given her tragic past, Brigid knows that people are capable of anything. Weaving her way through the massive crowds and to her church to do Easter mass, Brigid mentally prepares herself to speak to everyone. Once before her congregation and after her initial talk, a man shouts at her from the crowd. Brigid feels sharp pain across her body and her world goes dark.

The book then flashes back to the beginning of Brigid Fitzgerald’s remarkable adult life. She graduated young from college and headed to the front lines of Sudan to work as a doctor in refugee camps. Working there earned her the adoration of her coworkers and the refugees, but also targeted her as the enemy of many powerful people. The Sudan was the first in a traumatic series of trials that prove to test her faith in humanity and in God at every single turn. Just when her life seems to be going well and God has decided to bless her, Brigid is tested again and again in a number of ways that had me wondering where she even found the strength to get out of bed every day.

Brigid began life as the daughter of drug-addled parents and her childhood was rife with drama. Going to the Sudan and then traveling around the world helping others gives meaning to her life. Brigid’s own convictions and callings differ from those of the mainstream Catholic Church, a fact that puts her at odds with and makes her a target of those who believe adherence to tradition is of utmost importance. Despite the threats and the immense loss she goes through, Brigid is forced to rise above and find a way to rally people behind her, so she doesn’t lose her faith or her life.

I greatly enjoyed this book, even though it made me a bucket of emotions at times. There are so many intricate pieces that fit into making Brigid the woman that she is.  10/10: would recommend.


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May the Fourth: International Firefighters Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/04/may-the-fourth-international-firefighters-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/05/04/may-the-fourth-international-firefighters-day/ Thu, 04 May 2017 14:59:52 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Geeks everywhere know what day it is. That’s right, it’s International Firefighters Day! Did you know that Davenport, Iowa is home to the International Fire Museum? The Museum is located in the old Hose Company No. 4 at 2301 E … Continue reading

Geeks everywhere know what day it is. That’s right, it’s International Firefighters Day!

Did you know that Davenport, Iowa is home to the International Fire Museum?

The Museum is located in the old Hose Company No. 4 at 2301 E 11th Street in the Village of East Davenport. 

 Hose Station No. 4 was built in 1931, replacing the previous Hose Company No. 4 headquarters at 15101 E 12th Street. The Italianate style building was designed by Howard S. Muesses, architect and former Davenport city building commissioner. 

The Davenport Fire Antique & Restoration Society, founded in 1984 by members if the Davenport Fire Department, worked with the city to open the Museum in 1986.

The museum is home to artifacts, photographs, and fire-fighting memorabilia from around the world, including a 1951 Mack pumper purchased from the city of Riverdale, Iowa. 

And what’s a Firefighter’s Day without photos of firefighters posed proudly with their engines?

Subjects identified as Erwin “Red” Freese, Charles Garvey- chauffeur, Lt. Charles Hintze, Walter “Tang” Beckmann- chauffeur, Captain Don Johnston, John Ward. Identified by Cliff Beckman, a retired firefighter in 1993.

Be sure to check out the museum this weekend while you are at the 5th annual Village in Bloom Arts Festival!

 

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Jazz Appreciation Month: Freegal Music Service http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/29/jazz-appreciation-month-freegal-music-service/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/29/jazz-appreciation-month-freegal-music-service/ Sat, 29 Apr 2017 12:51:28 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Ever wish you had more Bix in your music collection?  Use Freegal Music Service to download 3 free songs per week!  Click on the link under Online Resources on our website and log in with your Davenport Public Library card to start downloading … Continue reading

Ever wish you had more Bix in your music collection? 

Use Freegal Music Service to download 3 free songs per week! 

Click on the link under Online Resources on our website and log in with your Davenport Public Library card to start downloading all that Jazz!

 

(posted by Cristina)

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Look Alike Day: The Putnam & Parker Buildings http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/21/look-alike-day-the-putnam-parker-buildings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/21/look-alike-day-the-putnam-parker-buildings/ Fri, 21 Apr 2017 16:20:25 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections April 20th is National Look Alike Day, and we’ve decided to share Davenport twins! Downtown Davenport has two buildings with similar facades: the Putnam building at 215 Main and the M.L. Parker building at 104 W 2nd. Here are some facts about … Continue reading

April 20th is National Look Alike Day, and we’ve decided to share Davenport twins!

Downtown Davenport has two buildings with similar facades: the Putnam building at 215 Main and the M.L. Parker building at 104 W 2nd. Here are some facts about each building: 

 

Putnam building

  • Year built: 1910
  • Address: 215 Main (2nd & Main)
  • Size: 8 stories high, 60 ft X 140 ft.
  • Use: Retail on 1st floor, the rest was an office building
  • Architect: D.H. Burnham & Company, Chicago
  • Developer: W.C. Putnam Estate
  • Davenport’s first skyscraper
  • Toilets: There were toilets for men on each floor. On the 8th floor there was a “special women’s toilet with a rest room”, which was a “new” feature in office buildings  

 

 

The M.L. Parker building

  • Year built: 1922
  • Address: 104 W 2nd (NW corner of 2nd & Brady St.)
  • Size: 7 stories, 108 ft X 142 ft
  • Use: M.L. Parker department store on 1st floor, the rest was an office building
  • Architect: Modified version of Burnham’s design
  • Developer: W.C. Putnam Estate
  • Built on the site of the LeClaire House Hotel

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not exactly alike, but definitely in the same family!

 

Works Cited

About the Putnam Block. (2007, September 25). Quad-City Times, p. A2.

Brown, M. (1981, January 21). Parker Building bounces back. Quad-City Times.

(1983). Profile of the Parker Building. Davenport, Iowa: W.C. Putnam Estate.

Putnam Building. (1910). Davenport, Iowa: W.C. Putnam Estate.

Willard, J. (2003, January 10). Putnam Building has storied history. Quad-City Times, p. A2.

Work of Wreckers Proves Attaction: Many Watch Men Tearing Down Old Putnam Building. (1910, March 08). The Daily Times, p. 4.

 

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In Memoriam: Patricia L. Scott http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/13/in-memoriam-patricia-l-scott/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/13/in-memoriam-patricia-l-scott/ Thu, 13 Apr 2017 16:17:51 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Staff at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center are saddened by the loss of our friend. Pat Scott passed away on Sunday, April 9th, 2017 at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf, Scott Co. Iowa.  Patricia Louise (Bracker) Scott was born … Continue reading

Staff at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center are saddened by the loss of our friend. Pat Scott passed away on Sunday, April 9th, 2017 at the Clarissa C. Cook Hospice House in Bettendorf, Scott Co. Iowa. 

Patricia Louise (Bracker) Scott was born December 27, 1932 in Davenport, Scott Co., Iowa. Her parents were Harold H. and Charlotte Louise (Lorrain) Bracker. She married Harold Wayne Scott on June 6th, 1953 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Davenport.

Bracker family portrait by Free, Oct 1951 (standing in back row on the left)

She attended Immaculate Conception Academy and Marycrest College, graduating in 1964 with a Bachelor of Elementary Education. Pat taught 3rd grade at Lourdes Memorial School (1960 – 1968) and Grant Elementary School (1968 – 1988).

Mrs. Scott’s 3rd grade class at Grant Elementary School, 1976-77

Pat was a long time volunteer at the Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center: working the desk, helping patrons with their genealogy questions; compiling indexes for social events published in the Quad-City Times; working with St. Anthony’s Catholic Church Records and Cemetery Records for Pine Hill Cemetery. A retired teacher, she taught beginning genealogy classes at the library for many years. Pat was one of the original charter members and past president of the Scott County Iowa Genealogical Society, founded on October 30th, 1973, and was named SCIGS Volunteer of the Year in 1998.

 

National Volunteer Week, April 1996

Pat donated many items from her personal collection to the library. When her health kept her away from the library, she was a frequent caller to the Center. Staff looked forward to her calls and hearing about what she was working on. She will be missed.

(posted by Cristina)

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It’s Opening Day at Modern Woodmen Park Stadium, thanks to the Depression-era Dreams of the Davenport Levee Commission http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/06/its-opening-day-at-modern-woodmen-park-stadium-thanks-to-the-depression-era-dreams-of-the-davenport-levee-commission/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/04/06/its-opening-day-at-modern-woodmen-park-stadium-thanks-to-the-depression-era-dreams-of-the-davenport-levee-commission/ Thu, 06 Apr 2017 14:47:27 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Opening Day for local baseball is here! Yes, the Quad Cities River Bandits* will battle the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers tonight at the historic Modern Woodmen Park stadium as our minor league baseball season officially begins. In honor of the 2017 … Continue reading

Opening Day for local baseball is here! Yes, the Quad Cities River Bandits* will battle the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers tonight at the historic Modern Woodmen Park stadium as our minor league baseball season officially begins.

In honor of the 2017 season, we thought we would look back at the early history of Modern Woodmen Park.

Baseball has been a popular sport in Davenport since the mid-1800s. Over time, baseball associations developed to help organize baseball games between local cities. In 1901 a new organization formed when the Davenport River Rats became a charter member in the Illinois-Indiana-Iowa League (also known as the Three-I League).

Davenport played in the Three-I League through the 1916 season. Over the years the team was known as the Davenport River Rats, Davenport Riversides, Davenport Knickerbockers, Davenport Prodigals, and Davenport Blue Sox.

Changes within the Three-I League led the Blue Sox to leave the franchise after the 1916 season. It wasn’t until 1929 that the Davenport Blue Sox reorganized and joined the Mississippi Valley League. With few large baseball fields in Davenport, the Blue Sox used a field at the Mississippi Valley Fairgrounds for home games.

Fans soon discovered the fairgrounds baseball field was lacking in modern amenities compared to Douglas Park in Rock Island and Browning Field in Moline. Its distance from downtown Davenport was another mark against it, as fans had to spend money on public transportation or extra gas for their vehicles to attend games.

By early 1930, the Davenport Blue Sox’s managers, the Davenport Baseball Club, began to worry that the outdated field would threaten the team’s place in Mississippi Valley League.

With an interest in keeping baseball in the city, the Davenport Levee Commission stepped in to help fill the need for a new modern stadium.

On September 17, 1930 the Davenport Levee Commission authorized the construction of a municipal stadium with a preliminary cost estimate of $60,000. The initial plan was for a baseball park, a football field, practice softball/baseball fields, tennis courts, and playgrounds to be built. The complex would occupy the property between Gaines Street and LeClaire Park, and from the railroad tracks to the riverfront.

Close proximity to downtown Davenport, easy access from Rock Island and Moline, and the potential to create a large parking area were among the benefits touted by the Levee Commission.

With lights for night games, the stadium would allow the Blue Sox to compete with other teams in their franchise whose stadiums had been similarly updated.

In the announcement for what they then called the Municipal Stadium, the Davenport Levee Commission made it clear the stadium was not being built for baseball only. It was intended as a recreation center for the citizens of Davenport to enjoy year-round.

The Levee Commission pushed to start building the facility before plans were even finalized. Mr. Walter Priester, secretary, stated, “One of the paramount reasons for immediate work on the stadium is to give employment to many in Davenport.” With the beginning of the Great Depression, employment opportunities were scarce, and the Levee Commission wanted to put as many local men to work as possible.

Ground was broken on the project in early November of 1930. The Levee Commission quickly decided to increase the budget by $100,000 to provide for a more permanent grandstand and work along the riverfront.**

The dedication of the Davenport Municipal Stadium was held on May 26, 1931, at the start of the first afternoon baseball game. With the increase in cost to build a more substantial grandstand, all other planned recreational areas were put on hold. Also on hold was the idea to build a park area running from the baseball stadium west to Credit Island.

Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 27, 1931. Pg. 22

That afternoon, the Davenport Blue Sox beat the Dubuque Tigers in a score of 7 to 1.

The first night game was held on June 4, 1931. Over 3,000 spectators came to watch Davenport play against Rock Island under the glare of lights mounted on six 100-foot steel towers. One can imagine that even the Blue Sox’s loss that night did not diminish the excitement of watching an illuminated night game. It was reported that the glow of the lights could be seen from miles around.

Since 1931, the stadium has hosted numerous events including baseball games, football games, boxing matches, local junior Olympics, concerts, circuses, and more.

Municipal Stadium c. 1934 during WPA Project #11 – 02-05-1934.

 

Seawall and Levee. March 30, 1934. Vol. #13 dpl2003-14b1f8d

Expansions over the years added more seating to the stadium and modernized existing features. The name of the structure was also changed over time. In 1971, it became known as the John O’Donnell Stadium, and in 2007, the Modern Woodmen Park.

What may you expect to find at the ballpark in 2017? Grandstand, bleacher, or berm seating, a children’s area, an enormous Ferris wheel, fabulous ballpark food, an amazing river view, and, of course, outstanding baseball.

87 years ago, the Levee Commission dreamed big on baseball and Davenport. We hope you stop by this summer to see the amazing results!

(posted by Amy D.)

*The Quad Cities River Bandits are a Class A minor league baseball team affiliated with the Houston Astros.

**The official cost from the April 1, 1930 – March 31, 1931 Levee Commission report to the Davenport City Council was $136,385.97.

Resources

  • Burlington Gazette (IA), March 23, 1929. Pg. 12.
  • Davenport Daily Democrat and Leader, September 17, 1930. Front Page.
  • Davenport Daily Times, November 13, 1930. Pg. 12.
  • Davenport Democrat and Leader, May 27, 1931. Pg. 22.
  • Davenport Daily Times, May 26, 1931. Pg. 13.
  • Davenport Daily Times, June 5, 1931. Pg. 24.
  • Annual Reports of the City Officers of the City of Davenport 1930 – 1931 by the City of Davenport, Iowa. Published 1931. SC352.0777 DAV
  • Baseball at Davenport’s John O’Donnell Stadium by Tim Rask. Published 2004. SC796.357 RAS
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Walking Matches: A nineteenth century competitive sport http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/24/walking-matches-a-nineteenth-century-competitive-sport/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/24/walking-matches-a-nineteenth-century-competitive-sport/ Fri, 24 Mar 2017 11:15:01 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections We have written about the competitive spirit of early residents of Scott County, Iowa in the past. From an early running bet to bike races, the residents of Scott County were always game to try new things. So it’s no … Continue reading

We have written about the competitive spirit of early residents of Scott County, Iowa in the past. From an early running bet to bike races, the residents of Scott County were always game to try new things. So it’s no surprise a new competitive sport of the past caught our attention this week.

Walking Matches, also known as Pedestrian Matches, became a fad during the 1860s (starting about 1861, but interest only picked up in the United States after the Civil War) through the mid-1880s. Competitive walking was an international obsession with large competitions being held in major cities across Europe. Thousands of onlookers in larger cities paid to watch walkers compete in one of two ways:  a set number of miles in the shortest time or the longest distance in a set amount of time.

Davenport, and Scott County, quickly took up the Walking Match fad. A notice in the Davenport Daily Gazette, from May 5, 1868 proclaimed a Walking Match would be held on May 9th at the Scott County Fairgrounds with the distance set at 10 miles. (Pg. 4) Who won, you ask? As the match was postponed due to rain, we aren’t sure who the winner turned out to be- or if the match was held at all.

Davenport Daily Gazette, May 5, 1868. Pg. 4

By 1876, the Davenport Daily Gazette advertised on the front page on November 4, 1876 that the German Theatre in Davenport would be the site of a great walking match between John J. Geraghty of St. Louis and John Oddy of Philadelphia. The men were competing in a 14-mile walking race. 

Davenport Daily Gazette, November 4, 1876. Pg. 1

Mr. Geraghty and Mr. Oddy were most likely professionals on the Walking Match circuit and traveled from city to city competing. Most professional winners took home money put up by the sponsors and also received part of the gate receipts.

Amateur competitions also abounded in Davenport and other local cities. The Davenport Daily Gazette posted on March 25, 1879 that an amateur walking match was to be held at the German Theatre, starting at midnight the following night, with John Bowlsby, of Tipton, Iowa, and William B. Logan and C. E. Muhl, both of Davenport. (Pg. 4)

According to the follow up story on March 27, 1879, a professional walker, Prof. E. E. Miller, walked with the three amateurs:  Mr. Bowlsby, Mr. Logan, and Mr. Muhl. The three amateur competitors vied for a silver hunting watch, while Prof. Miller earned a portion of the ticket sales if he completed his agreed upon 100 miles in 22 hours. At midnight on March 27th  300 hundred spectators watched the start of the race. (Pg. 4)

Great detail in the news article described Prof. Miller: he was 23 years old, about 5’10” tall, and 150 pounds. He wore a stripped woolen shirt, blue knee breeches, stockings, and light shoes. It was noted he wore no hat.

The length of the sawdust covered indoor track was 176 feet, and one mile equaled 30 times around. The competition continued until 10:00 p.m. the following night. The Davenport Daily Gazette on March 28, 1879 reported that, during the event, lively music was played as attendance grew smaller in the afternoon but picked up again at night.

Prof. Miller walked from midnight until 4:14 a.m. when he rested for one hour, and by 3:43 p.m. he was on his 72nd mile. He finished his 100 miles in 21 hours, 57 minutes, and 30 seconds after resting for only 2 hours and 59 minutes during the entire event. He accomplished the task with 2 minutes and 30 seconds to spare!

As for the amateurs, Mr. Bowlsby walked from midnight until 6:30 p.m, when he left the race. He walked the entire time with only one 15-minute rest and completed 76 miles and two laps. Mr. Muhl retired about 6:15 p.m. having achieved 74 miles. Mr. Logan completed his 50th mile – and the competition- at about 1:30 p.m.. He retired from the event and did not return. Consequently, Mr. Bowlsby received the silver hunting watch in the amateur division. 

After the conclusion of the race, Prof. Miller challenged Madame DuPree, a professional Pedestrienne as the women were called, to a race. She later accepted and the two took part in a four day event held in Rock Island, Illinois in late April 1879. (Pg. 4)

Walking Matches continued into the early 1880s in Davenport and surrounding areas. Slowly, as the international crowd drifted away from the sport, local interest followed suit. But once upon a time, individuals could gain local fame simply by walking – and walking some more.

(posted by Amy D.)

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Irish Resources for your St. Patrick’s Day Perusing Pleasure http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/sc/2017/03/17/irish-resources-for-your-st-patricks-day-perusing-pleasure/ Fri, 17 Mar 2017 10:41:16 -0500 SCblogger at Primary Selections from Special Collections Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources. Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:     AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!) Irish Genealogy Tool … Continue reading

Today being St. Patrick’s Day, we thought we would share some Irish resources.

Special limited time offers for FREE access to genealogy websites pertaining to Irish Research:

 

 

AmericanAncestors.org     (all Irish resources FREE March 15-22!)

Irish Genealogy Tool Kit

IrishCentral

Irish Genealogy.ie

 

 

Have you ever wanted to take a closer look at the Book of Kells? Check out the digitized book from Trinity College Dublin. 

 

 

In our Collections: 

Local Ancient Order of Hibernians


 

 

Can you believe the Grand Parade has been going on for 32 years?! The Richardson-Sloane Special Collections Center has a number of early posters for the parade in our Ephemera collection.

Image courtesy of Our Quad Cities

 

Interested in local Irish-American stories? The 2007-2008 Iowa Stories 2000 topic brought out local individuals with great stories to tell. Their oral histories are archived here as well.

 

 

The Celtic Heritage Trail of the Quad-Cities was an active local organization in the early 2000’s. Their records contain a good deal of Irish history and lore. Available from our Archive & Manuscript Collection. 

 

Come visit us for all of your Irish genealogy and history research needs!

 

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Be my valentine….. http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/kids/2014/02/12/be-my-valentine/ Wed, 12 Feb 2014 14:38:43 -0600 Angie at DPL Kids Blog Love, Splat by Rob Scotton How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  … Continue reading

Love, Splat

by Rob Scotton

How do you tell someone that you like them when everytime you get close to them your heart drums and your tummy rumbles?   Poor Splat has to figure it out quick – it’s Valentines Day!  Luckily Kitten takes matters into her own paws and the day is saved!!  Share this cute, cuddly tale with your favorite little shy valentine.

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We have moved! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/30/we-have-moved/ Thu, 30 Jan 2014 10:48:15 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

tumblr

Exciting news!  You can now find DPL Teens on your favorite social networking site, Tumblr!  From now on, that’s where you’ll find all of our YA book reviews, program updates, book/movie trailers, and more.

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2014 Michael L. Printz Award http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/2014-michael-l-printz-award/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 13:47:39 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens             This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are! Printz Honors: Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here) […]

eleanorkingdommaggotnavigating

 

 

 

 

 

 

This morning the recipients of biggest award in YA fiction, the Michael L. Printz Award, were announced.  This year there were 4 Printz Honor books and 1 winner of the Printz Award.  And here they are!

Printz Honors:

Eleanor & Park by Rainbow Rowell (YAYYYYY!  Read my review here)

Kingdom of Little Wounds by Susann Cokal

Maggot Moon by Sally Gardner

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

midwinterbloodAnd the big winner of the Printz Award for 2014 is….

Midwinterblood by Marcus Sedgwick

To place holds on any of the books, click the title or the cover.  So what do you think of the winners?  Are you happy or did your favorite get snubbed?  Sound off in the comments!

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Divergent by Veronica Roth http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/27/divergent-by-veronica-roth/ Mon, 27 Jan 2014 08:00:21 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens And now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany! In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and […]

divergentAnd now for a review from our newest guest blogger, Bethany!

In Veronica Roth’s dystopian book Divergent there are five different factions that a person can be a part of. During the year a person would turn 16, they decided which faction they are going to join. Most choose the one they were born and raised in. Here are my interpretation of the five factions:  the AP student- as in “going to Harvard for free” people, the super kind people (sometimes you wonder if they’re being legit because they’re too kind), the “really rude because they’re extremely honest” people (don’t we all know the phrase: ‘No offense, but’), the BA people (as in jumping off moving trains and being stupid YOLO) and last and the least- stereotypical 60’s hippies.  In this make believe world everybody’s genes are wired towards one of these five personalities. (This is when I started to doubt the book.  Get me on a day with little or no sleep and count the different personalities I have). If you do not have one of these five personalities you are an enemy to the state!  Ok, well not right away, but you are Divergent. And if you’re Divergent, don’t you dare tell anybody because it’s bad.

My first issue with Divergent was the whole idea of these five factions. It’s silliness! Go to work, go to school, heck, go to mall and you will see many more than five different personalities. The book presents five different core beliefs, and you can only have one. Right, because there are only five different religious beliefs in the real world which make this seem plausible….but that wasn’t my only issue with this book. The main character goes from going to school, to choosing your life. One day you’re in school, you get this test and then the next day you choose your faction. For the next month or so you’re in training and BAM you’re an adult with a job associated with your special faction. Huh? Does this happen in real life? I can answer that for you, no. Also, the lack of adults really drove me bananas. There were kids teaching kids stuff, that wouldn’t really happen. I would not be qualified to teach a class after a year, maybe two, of study. How do you become a teacher, oh, just four years of school, at least! So that didn’t make any sense. But at this point I shouldn’t really be expecting the book to make any sense.

As much as I wasn’t a fan of this book, there were things I liked.  Beatrice, the main character, I liked. Though her world was far from every being okay, she could exist. Her character was real, and I could imagine seeing her walking down the street. In fact, most of the characters I liked. Wonderful character development all around; but you can only get too attached to a character that is in a world that would never happen. And, when the fighting happens, people die. Though that might sound odd, I personally cannot stand when a huge epic battle happens and none of the characters you’ve come to love die because that doesn’t happen in real life. Even though this society would never come to be, Roth does try to have the things that happen in it buyable.  Let’s see…what else did I like….yeah, I think that’s about it.

So maybe I’m being a little harsh on Divergent; after all, I had to put it on hold because of its popularity in order to read it. There is obviously something there or it wouldn’t be as popular as it is.

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Coming to theaters near you: TFiOS! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/23/coming-to-theaters-near-you-tfios/ Thu, 23 Jan 2014 08:00:12 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see […]

fault-our-stars-movie-poster

There’s recently been a bit of an uproar about photos and the poster that have been released for the upcoming movie version of John Green’s hit novel The Fault in Our Stars.  Some of the controversy surrounds the movie poster’s tagline: “One sick love story.”  Additionally, in many of the stills from the movie (see below), Hazel isn’t wearing her cannula, including during the big moment in the Anne Frank House.

tfiostfios3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

tfios4tfios2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

So what do you think?  Is the tagline insensitive, or is it just the type of humor Hazel would find funny?  Is it troubling that Hazel isn’t always wearing her cannula like she has to in the book?  Sound off in the comments!

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Tonight: TVC and Anime Club! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/21/tonight-tvc-and-anime-club/ Tue, 21 Jan 2014 08:00:53 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night! Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library. Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our […]

animeclub

That’s right, DPL’s Teen Volunteer Council and Anime Club are now meeting on the same night!

Join TVC at 5:00 to discuss your ideas for upcoming programs and find out about future volunteering opportunities within the library.

Then stick around for Anime Club at 5:30, where we’ll be eating noodles as always and continuing our viewing of a beloved anime series!

See you then!

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Closed for Martin Luther King, Jr. Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2014/01/20/mlk/ Mon, 20 Jan 2014 09:00:14 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a great day, and peace!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, January 20th, in observance of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, January 21st. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a great day, and peace!

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Book Trailer Thursday: Cress http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/16/book-trailer-thursday-cress/ Thu, 16 Jan 2014 08:00:43 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens   Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, […]

 

Did you tear through Marissa Meyer’s sci-fi fairy tales Cinder and Scarlet, and now you’ve been waiting and waiting and waiting for the next book in the series?  The wait is almost over!!  Book three in The Lunar Chronicles, Cress, will be released on February 4th!  Check out the brand new book trailer above, and then click here to place a hold on a copy!

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New books at DPL! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/teens/2014/01/14/9440/ Tue, 14 Jan 2014 08:00:08 -0600 Lexie at DPL TeensDPL Teens TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

TONS of new YA books are on their way to our New Books shelves at all 3 DPL locations!  A small sampling are pictured above, click any of them to place a hold!  For even more new and upcoming YA books, visit our Check It Out page!

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Closed for New Year’s Eve and Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/30/closed-for-new-year/ Mon, 30 Dec 2013 09:30:48 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a fantastic year!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 31st and January 1st for the holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, January 2nd. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a fantastic year!

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Closed for the holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/23/closed-for-the-holiday/ Mon, 23 Dec 2013 09:30:10 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Tuesday and Wednesday, December 24th and 25th so our staff may spend time with their families. We will reopen our normal hours on Thursday, December 26th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/16/special-showing-of-harry-potter-and-the-sorcerers-stone/ Mon, 16 Dec 2013 10:27:40 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library   Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer! Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St) When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm Age: […]

Harry Potter movie

 

Winter at Hogwarts left you craving more Harry Potter? Luckily for you, we have a special showing of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, where you can hang out with other muggles and drink butterbeer!

Where: Fairmount Branch Library (3000 N Fairmount St)
When: Thursday, December 26th @2:00pm
Age: All ages
Cost: Free!
For more information: Call 563-326-7832

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Winter at Hogwarts is almost full! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/12/04/winter-at-hogwarts-is-almost-full/ Wed, 04 Dec 2013 10:03:09 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event! What: Winter at Hogwarts When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue) Register: 563-326-7832

It’s so close, and we’re almost at maximum capacity. Make sure you hurry and register for this exciting event!

What: Winter at Hogwarts
When: Saturday, December 7 @7:00pm
Where: Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch Library (6000 Eastern Avenue)
Register: 563-326-7832

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Closed for the Thanksgiving holiday http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/27/closed-for-thanksgiving-2/ Wed, 27 Nov 2013 09:00:00 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful holiday!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Thursday and Friday, November 28th and 29th in observance of the Thanksgiving holiday. We will reopen our normal hours on Saturday, November 30th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful holiday!

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Harry Potter window mural http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/26/harry-potter-window-mural/ Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:30:32 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair! Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends […]

Check out our new window mural out at the Davenport Eastern Avenue Branch, with bonus snow for flair!

Harry Potter and Hedwig • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054097096/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Sorting Hat • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054125904/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Snitch and Broom • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054180133/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Hogwarts and House Crests • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054183873/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>
Harry Potter's Glasses • <a style="font-size:0.8em;" href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/100983591@N04/11054022045/" target="_blank">View on Flickr</a>

Don’t forget to RSVP for Winter at Hogwarts on Saturday, December 7th, 2013 at 7:00pm at the Eastern Avenue Branch: 563-326-7832. We will be celebrating the world of Harry Potter and friends with costumes, food, and games. This free event is for all ages!

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Closed for Veterans Day http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/11/10/closed-for-veterans-day/ Sun, 10 Nov 2013 22:24:58 -0600 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day. Have a wonderful day!

All three Davenport Public Library locations will be closed Monday, November 11th in observance of Veterans Day. We will reopen our normal hours on Tuesday, November 12th. As always, our website is available 24 hours a day.

Have a wonderful day!

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Saturday’s Cemetery Tour Still Has Openings! http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/25/cemetery-tour/ Fri, 25 Oct 2013 09:50:13 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet […]

Our evening Cemetery Tour is all filled up. However, the daytime tour this Saturday, October 26 at 1pm is still available! Just make sure you call in advance to reserve your spot (563-326-7832). The Fairmount Cemetery is located at 3902 Rockingham Road in Davenport, IA. Bring your sturdy shoes and meet us at the mausoleum!

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Last October Offerings Demonstration http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/pr/2013/10/24/october-offerings/ Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:36:08 -0500 Sharon at News & Events from the Davenport Public Library Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

Today is the last day for Special Collections’ genealogy databases demonstration, October Offerings! They will be at the Fairmount Branch tonight from 6:00-7:00pm. No registration is required, just bring yourself!

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Adult Election Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/adult-election-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:59:33 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand. In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and [...]

While teens are certainly the demographic filling out the most ballots, adults have been submitting ballots at each location to voice their opinions on the topics at hand.

In the race for favorite type of movie, adults have comedy in the lead followed closely by drama.  Westerns and musicals are getting very low numbers, and sports movies are getting no love at all.

General fiction is (oddly enough) winning the favorite genre race, but crime and mysteries are a close second with only 6 votes separating the two leaders.

E-books are massively more popular with adult readers than teens, but hardcover and paperback books are still the most popular of all.

While religious music was most popular with teen voters, several other types of music beat it out in the adult race.  Country and western music is most popular, followed by rock, rap, and classical.

The race for favorite library is much closer among adults, with Fairmount in the lead with 80 votes, Eastern coming in second with 68, and Main following in third place with 44.

The write-in responses have been very interesting, with the fireplace at Fairmount serving as a tipping point in some people’s votes for favorite library.  And, while Main may have the fewest votes for favorite library, the fans of the downtown location are fierce in their loyalty.  Some like it because it is the oldest and largest library in Davenport, while other people continue to use it because it was the library they used as children.

If you would like to sound off on your favorites, you can pick up a ballot at any of the three Davenport Library locations, and we will accept votes through March 3.

 

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Teen Ballot Update http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ http://blogs.davenportlibrary.com/wrp/2012/02/teen-ballot-update/ Thu, 16 Feb 2012 08:44:19 -0600 lgilbert at RED, WHITE, & READ 2012 The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions. Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category. Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic [...]

The Davenport area teens have been voting like crazy, and the elections for favorite things are swinging wildly in new directions.

Anime has taken the lead for favorite type of movie, garnering three times as many votes as any other category.

Fantasy and science fiction are holding steady for favorite type of book, with graphic novels coming in second.

Hardcover books are dominating in the format race, beating out e-books at an astonishing 148 votes to 6.  Looks like paper books won’t be going away any time soon.

Religious music is blowing the competition out of the water, earning more than twice the votes of the second-place winner, pop.

The Eastern Avenue Branch is dominating as favorite library with the teen voters with an astonishing 137 votes to Fairmount’s 49 votes and Main’s 9 votes.

If you don’t like any of the results in this post, it’s not too late to vote and be heard.  Ballots will be accepted at all three locations through March 3.

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